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Found 201 results

  1. Hey guys! I usually hunt in Florida but I'm heading home for a week in Pennsylvania and was wonder if any hunters wanted to get together and fossil hunt. I never hunted in my home state of PA and would like to change that! Also I'm fairly close to Delaware (C and D canal) so if anyone wants to hit that up let me know! Hope to hear from you guys soon, -Terry
  2. Good Spots in West Central PA?

    I'm going to take a trip from Miami to Pennsylvania to see some family. I was also considering to fossil hunt myself for something to do. I've only hunted in the Peace River, however, and I don't have much experience of actual digging. I'm trying to find some good spots that I can almost definitely find something interesting like a well preserved trilobite or something. I'm also interested in places like Red Hill to find some teeth and bone, or places with diverse ferns and lycopods. I only have a day to do it, so I probably wouldn't be too intrusive. I'd probably be staying in Indiana or Dubois (which me and my mother could significantly raise the population) but I don't want to be too far east from there. I just want to know some good spots and some tips to find the best fossils. thank you!
  3. Hello, all! Making a trip toward the end of this month down to Philadelphia from Buffalo. Planning on taking NY 390 -> NY 86 -> PA 81 -> PA 476. Looking for any road cuts or spots on that route, or nearby that route to hit on the trip. Any ideas? (I'm primarily interested in trilobite locations, but will entertain anything likely to be productive. It's a short trip, so quantity over quality is the objective here.) Thank you in advance! -Jay
  4. dino footprints need help identifying

    I found these three prints in the same creek. I have showed them to a lot of "experts" who have given many different possible identifications. Do any of these look familiar? The first two are 12 inches long and the third one is 5 inches. Thanks!
  5. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photo 1 & 2 show obverse; photo 3 shows reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  6. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photo 1 & 2 show obverse; photo 3 shows reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  7. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photo 1 & 2 show obverse; photo 3 shows reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  8. Dinosaur bone?

    I found this in my backyard in raubsville PA it was down about a foot in the ground.
  9. Hello my name is Sbob I'm new to the forum and am looking for help ID'ing my fossil . Found in West Allentown Pa. in the 1970's . It's been sitting on my window sill for years , Finally got the motivation to ID it. My area was not know for any type of fossils of this type ,primarily Limestone leaving me curious as how it got there? . Found with other small limestone around approximately 2' below the surface . The fossildude19 will be helping me with picture post shortly , Thanks in advance
  10. Tiny bubbles

    I found these in the creek back in September, this is the only pic I took (just now happened upon it in my files) and I can't find them to retake pics. The largest rock, the black one in the right of the frame, is no bigger than 2" at it's widest measurement, if that helps. I'm just really curious about what would make these little bubble-like formations printed on a rock like this. Bubbles?
  11. A new soft-bodied Ordovician marine creature https://phys.org/news/2018-01-rare-million-year-old-cone-shaped-fossil-discovery.html
  12. Plant material?

    This is obviously not a seed fern fossil, but the "fossil guy" at the flea market across the river in Jersey told me that it is a fern. My understanding was that it is petrified plant material, a petrified fern. I'm not confident in his identification as he, I now know, missed several identifiable pieces (crinoid columnals and a chunk of perfect rose quartz, for example) or simply wasn't as into looking as he said he was. So, I need another ID! Again, as usual, it was found under the bridge behind my house in Bucks County, PA along the creek not far from the Delaware river.
  13. Is this a bone?

    I have no idea, but it's small enough that good pics have been tricky and my curiosity has gotten the better of me so I am posting what I have. Can you give it a guess?
  14. Shell? Fossil? Egg?

    I can't figure out what this might be, I hope you can see it well enough. It was very hard to get good pics of the crushed side. I think it could be a crab shell, it's crushed but firm tho it seems slightly pliable and even breakable. It's not. The "mouth" seems to be more of a dent than an opening since sealed over and the perfect little circle on the top reminds me of a horseshoe crab. Some of the pics are color saturated to enhance the detail as best I could. Please, help, so curious!
  15. Geode?

    The fossil I want most to find, at this point in my addiction, is a tullymonster. A few months ago, I thought this might be one, but, now, I'm fairly certain it's just a geode and am just double checking by asking for an ID. I actually really dig (that's so punny, lol!) geodes, so I'll add it to my collection, but I have enough criniods and brachiopods. I'm throwing a little tullymonster fit!
  16. Fern non det.

    From the album Plants

    Fern non det. Upper Carboniferous Llewellyn Formation St. Clair Pennsylvania USA
  17. Fern non det.

    From the album Plants

    Fern non det. Upper Carboniferous Llewellyn Formation St. Clair Pennsylvania USA
  18. Conodont?

  19. TREE SECTION A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Unknown tree section SITE LOCATION: Shaffer Mountain, near Central City, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian (299-323 Million Years ago) This is in sandstone; some of the rocks in the area were glacial - this one is local rock. The tree type is unknown, but it may be Sigillaria or Lepidodendron, there are trace designs on the piece. Kingdom: Plantae
  20. TREE SECTION A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Unknown tree section SITE LOCATION: Shaffer Mountain, near Central City, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian (299-323 Million Years ago) This is in sandstone; some of the rocks in the area were glacial - this one is local rock. The tree type is unknown, but it may be Sigillaria or Lepidodendron, there are trace designs on the piece. Kingdom: Plantae
  21. Partial Thoracic Skeleton

    There is excavation for a housing development behind our home. On examination of some large excavated limestone boulders, I noticed what appeared to be a cross-section of thoracic (rib cage) of a skeleton. I suspect it is a fossil, being that there is a noticeable pattern within the same layer of sedimentary rock. I've attached a picture, please note the rust colored protrusions within the blue-gray limestone boulder. Thank you for any input on whether my suspicions are reasonable. If so, I intend to contact the construction company as to the location of where the boulder was excavated, and whether they are agreeable to removing it from construction use.
  22. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  23. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  24. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  25. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
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