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  1. Missourian

    Backyard Trip

    My folks have a nice lake behind their house. It is relaxing to spend a warm evening watching a heron spear fish or geese fight each other. Or watch silt slowly fill the lake bed. Across the street, a housing developer stripped off a bunch of soil down to the bedrock, but ran out of money before building on the land. This has resulted in some significant erosion and sedimentation in the lake, but this cloud does have a silver lining. I soon noticed a thick bed of shale exposed on the hill. So it was only a matter of time until I make the short trip to the top. The hill,
  2. I am going to start adding some images of my favorite finds which I call Collection Pieces. Identifications range from maybe, probably to most likely. I've only started to seriously collect over the past year. I've spent a great deal of time studying and learning Geology, as a hobby. I am located in Western Pennsylvania. At first, a map of the area. Anything in bright yellow is the Glenshaw Formation. The Ames Limestone layer exists between the Glenshaw and the Casselman Formations, which is the Orange color on the map. I have yet to explore the Ames Limestone, so I've only found f
  3. Lucas, S.G., DiMichele, W.A., Krainer, K., Barrick, J. E., Vachard, D., Donovan, M.P., Looy, C., Kerp, H., and Chaney, D.S. 2021, The Pennsylvanian System in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico, USA Stratigraphy, Petrography, Depositional Systems, Paleontology, Biostratigraphy, and Geologic History. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. no. 104. Smithsonian Press, ISBN: 1943-6688, 215 pp. Researchgate - PDF file Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology Kues, B.S., 2001. The Pennsylvanian System in New Mexi
  4. For the last 4 years I have been collecting plant fossils from sites in East Central Illinois. These fossils were all brought to the surface by underground coal mining in the first half of the 20th century. Most of the spoil piles in the area have been graded or flattened out, but a few still remain, standing tall above the flatland. One particular pile is, I believe, the source of most or all of the fossils I find. The shale that makes up the spoil has been fired by the internal heat of the pile, resulting in the hard, reddish material known as "red dog". This shale i
  5. paleo.nath

    Sphenopteris?

    This fossil was found at the North Attleboro fossil site, and I’ve had it marked down as a species of Sphenopteris but i’m not 100% certain
  6. I put this on the microfossil forum as well, but wanted to give a look-see to this intriguing fossil! In my search for conodonts in Pennsylvanian stark shale (between Winterset and Bethany falls limestone) I routinely find concretions/nodules-most are powdery but sometimes i find teeth and other microfossils. Well much to my surprise, upon splitting my thousanth shale, I found a 1cm nodule, and within it, this apparent micro sea urchin-one of two in the nodule. From spine to spine (7:00-1:00) it measures just under 2mm in diameter I am refining my photog techniques with a
  7. 1foolishcaribou

    limestone shelf

    Hi. Found among the huge limestone layer at the Caney River in central Washington County, northeastern Oklahoma. Pennsylvanian. It's a little closer to Kansas than to Tulsa. A few miles east of the Osage Hills (or Rolling Hills of the Osage, depending on the which map).
  8. 1foolishcaribou

    concave leaf shape

    I tried to fix these pics with GIMP but this is the best I could get. Found at the Caney River in central N.E. Oklahoma It is at an angle and is concave, one half to two inches long. It is kind of leaf shaped with a series of raised bumps through the center. Further to the right, reminds me of a tiny mud daubers nest which the wasps have grown and left. Thank you.
  9. 1foolishcaribou

    oblong rock in matrix

    Hi. This is on the Caney River, middle of Washington County in northeastern Oklahoma. It's in very hard matrix, can't do more than make a scratch on matrix surface. Pennsylvanian. Abou4" long, no more than 5" long. In the third picture what looks like a crack across the middle is just a shadow. Thank you.
  10. AshNBone

    Help ID marine fossil? Sponge?

    Hello again Fossil friends! I have another fossil I need help with. Found with other shell and coral fossils in a river shore in north eastern Kansas, most likely Pennsylvanian. It looks to be maybe a sponge with exterior and interior... structure? Couldn't figure this one out. Maybe someone with more knowledge can ID it for sure.
  11. AshNBone

    Bones and sponges? Help?

    Hello Fossil friends! I have a couple fossils(?) I'm going to see if I can get help identifying. I found all of them in the same local area of a river shore in northeastern Kansas, so I'm assuming Pennsylvanian time frame. I have some fossils that are obvious shells and coral, but these I'm not sure and would like your input! If you need more photos or angles, let me know. #1 I think is a fish vertebrae that's slightly flattened. It's about 1 cm x .3 cm.
  12. Samurai

    Campodus Sp. Tooth

    From the album: Chondrichthyan Teeth From The Pennsylvanian Period

    One of my favorites as it has a variety of color, from dark blue to orange and a pale yellowish white
  13. Rhizae42

    Substrate?

    There are fossils in the background gray sedimentary, but so much better preserved in brown! Why? Almost like this pile of creatures is on display, a 7 inch blob just laying on top of gray stone. I'm more interested in how these were preserved than what they are.
  14. 1foolishcaribou

    boulder anomalies

    Hi. I know these are poor pictures so I understand if nothing comes from them. This 3' by 3' boulder looks like a big dirt clog up close but is solid. It is in central Washington County, northeastern Oklahoma, Pennsylvanian I think, on the Caney River. 99% of the ground you see it sitting on going down the river and around the bend is coral, but I see no coral in this boulder or the only other boulder (out of view). In this post, the lower middle spot in all three pics is what I am curious about. It's about a foot wide.
  15. jikohr

    Mazon Creek id help

    Hey everyone, I recently got a bunch of stuff from Mazon Creek, which I have zero experience with. I would really appreciate some help in identifying this stuff, so here's a few of the things. Everything is from Mazon Creek Pennsylvanian in siderite concretions, the scale bar is in mm. The picture labels are what came to mind looking at them. Thanks Everyone!
  16. Samurai

    Multiple Pecopteris Ferns

    From the album: Missouri Plant Fossils

    When this came out of the earth I was shocked by how many were bundled together as I mostly find only fragmentary pieces of one specimen. The small limestone chunk on the left is a piece that came undone at the site I found this fossil at. More images of these fossils: https://imgur.com/a/KnjIeqG Correct id by Fossildude19
  17. Samurai

    Fish Spine Fossil? ( Missouri )

    Location is in Missouri The area is dated to the Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale I was cracking Phosphatic concretions and this baby popped out! I was excited and thought I should share and ask what it is! I believe it is a cartilaginous fish spine, but I have little knowledge in such topics. Ps Information on good glue to glue together the cracked piece is welcomed!
  18. It's been a long time since I've written a trip report. Not that I wasn't hiking, I was hiking like mad and finding stuff. Just didn't get around to documenting in the latter part of 2020. Too much craziness. A couple of days ago, I went in search of an extremely elusive shale formation, that contains some of the loveliest ferns I have seen. My records show I specifically planned 13 hikes last year trying to find another exposure. That was over 100 miles of fruitless searching. Zero. Zilch. Well, two days ago I found another small exposure. Scenic photos of the journey
  19. Over the past year, I've become fascinated with the often bizarre fish and sharks of the Pennsylvanian. Fortunately, my home state of Illinois is a great place to hunt for such fossils. I've shared several of these in other posts before, but wanted to put everything together in one thread. Probably won't have much to post for a few months after this, but once summer rolls around, I should hopefully have plenty of new finds to share. I would say there are three major settings in which you can find fish fossils in Illinois: Mazon Creek, black shales, and limestone. I have not had luc
  20. connorp

    Encrusting brachiopod?

    While organizing today, I came across this Composita I collected a while ago in the Pennsylvanian of Illinois. I noticed it had something encrusting it, which was surprising since brachs from this site never seem to have any encrusting organisms. Whatever it is, it is not preserved super well, but it almost looks like a tiny productid brachiopod? Never seen anything like it. Any thoughts? @Tidgy's Dad
  21. Finding a complete specimen is my white whale. Usually only find small fragments, these three are my most complete. Am able to use a few bits to get a “reconstruction” cannot figure out what these are. thanks in advance!
  22. Samurai

    Shell fragment from Metacoceras Sp

    From the album: Missouri Ammonites and Nautiloids

    This fragmented shell is 5-6 cm in total length (above) (2.5cm) here is another fragment from Metacoceras sp
  23. FossilNerd

    Wayne's Carboniferous

    When it comes to fossils, I am a generalist by nature. I haven't met a fossil that I didn't like! However, in an attempt to narrow my focus a bit, I have decided to take a cue from Adam ( @Tidgy's Dad ) and start this thread. I hope to showcase some of my collection, but more importantly have a central place to post IDed specimens, information I have found regarding them, and/or ask for help with IDs. Hopefully other's will get enjoyment from seeing the specimens and potentially learn a thing or two. So come along on my journey through the Carboniferous! If you haven't had the plea
  24. NMFOSSILS99

    Possible Pennsylvanian Plant?

    Happy Friday from Albuquerque, New Mexico! We have been hunting for fossils in the Sandia/Manzano mountains just east of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our beautiful back yard. . . Pennsylvanian fossils can be found in the limestone that is exposed at the top of the Sandia Crest and east of the mountain. We mostly find brachiopods, crinoids and bryozoan. I found this on the hills of Cedro Peak, and it's not like anything we have found up there. Thought it might be a crinoid stem, but looks different. Any help identifying would be much appreciated.
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