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Found 543 results

  1. The Bad Bush

    Here is a 300lb slab of rock I chisled out of my back yard that has a bush on it from the carboniferous this is in Lincoln County WV, Iron pyrite and quarts sandstone medium sizes grains matrix
  2. Metacoceras?

    Found this in what I call limestone locally, but it is more of a sandstone/shale mix. Very hard, black and cement like. Squares are 1 inch. I air scribed it out of the rock, where 50% was showing. My layer specifically is Woods Run Marine Zone, a hundred or so feet below Ames Limestone. It is the Glenshaw Formation. I am in Western PA. Also, this is my first forum post. I have several other types to post, but I figured I would start with this.
  3. Geological

    Found this piece while digging into the hillside behind the house near lake Wister in Southeast Oklahoma. The area is primarily Pennsylvanian and I have found some beautiful specimens on the land. There are a lot of limestone and sandstone ledges and outcroppings all over the property. I do t see any tooling marks on the edges so believe the shape is natural but not sure what the texturing is. Any help would be appreciated.
  4. Hi! Previous weekend me and my friend (paleozoic echinoderms researcher) spent in the quarry near Kasimov (Ryazan region, Russia) where upper carboniferous (pennsylvanian) deposits are exposed. This was an opening of the new fossil hunting season. The main target were echinoderms and especially crinoids. The weather was not very comfortable (+6 C and some rain) but perfect for echinoderm hunting. They become contrast and much more visible when wet. Here is some pictures.
  5. Plant fossils from Texas

    Found these plant fossils along with calamities. Need help in identifying. Found in north Texas in the Mingus Formation, Pennsylvanian, along a river bed. Thanks in advance for your assistance.
  6. Wister 3

    Found in Oklahoma near lake Wister. The area is predominately Pennsylvanian. Geological?
  7. Wister 2

    This was found when clearing rocks on my property in Wister, Ok. The area is predominately Pennsylvanian. Any help identifying would be appreciated.
  8. Lake Wister Area

    Found this digging in my yard near Lake Wister Ok. The region is primarily Pennsylvanian. Not sure if this is geological or something else. Whatever it is it’s pretty cool.
  9. Please Help

    Hello, I recently collected these fossils in the Minerals Wells area in North Texas, and I am not having any luck identifying the fossils. I know that I found the fossils in Pennsylvanian age sediment, and that’s about it. I really appreciate everyone who takes the time to help me.
  10. Fossil from kansas

    Not sure what these are. Maybe some sort of Bryozoa stem? I have hunted for years here in kansas and never come across this it's little round black balls in rows
  11. Calamites?

    I think the first picture is collapsed Calamites and the second 2 are part of the offshoot of a calamites. Not sure about the spelling but know itwas a type of cat tail. These were found in Southeast Oklahoma near Wister Lake. The area is Pennsylvanian.
  12. Janassa tooth discoloration

    Hey guys! I shared with you a few months ago my janassa toothplate, but the tooth has been showing some signs of progressive discoloration. It is slowly starting to grey in some areas, but’s never been exposed to vinegar or any real form of fossil prep. It is not moved around either so it’s not getting dinged up. Is this cause for alarm? I know only parts of the fossil are changing now, but I just want to ensure that the fossil isn’t going to be damaged by this in the future. Thank you.
  13. Crinoid?

    Hey guys! I found this fossil in east Kansas (Pennsylvanian) and thought it was a crinoid. However the shape is different looking. Do you think it’s a crinoid? Thank you! (The 2 parts belong together and yeah it’s pretty eroded)
  14. So as the titles states "Mazon Creek Collecting or the Joy of Instant Gratification- Choose Wisely", that was my choice today, and I choose instant gratification. Even though I have not been out to Pit 11 this year, I wanted to find some fossils and not just concretions with the hope of finding something, plus I still have a lot of buckets to crack open, so I decided to collect some other Pennsylvanian fossils. I decided to stop by a road cut that exposes the LaSalle Limestone member of the Bond Formation and had a great day collecting in near 40 degree weather. It was very sketchy collecting today since the ground is not frozen, but it is also not thawed, so it is very slick in the none snow covered area and it can send you sliding to the bottom of the road cut as it did to me today- a nice controlled slide of about 20 feet. Here are only a few of my finds from today, after a short time I stopped taking pics. Here is a nice partial Peripristis Shark Tooth, I believe I found a couple other possible partial teeth, but I will check those out tomorrow. A few large Echinaria brachiopods- Many big Composita argentia brachiopods- A little Orthoconic nautiloid- Spirifer brachiopod- Linoproductus cora brachiopods- Juresania nebrascensis an Spirifer brachiopods-
  15. Fossil hunting season at Illinois's Mazonia-Braidwood State Fish and Wildlife Area, the iconic Pit 11, runs from March to September every year. I didn't make it to the park at all last year, so I wanted to get out there on day 1 this year. I took the day off work and thankfully the weather cooperated- it was cloudy and in the 30s for most of the day. I picked up my rental car at 7:30 in the morning and hit the road for the 90 minute drive north. I wasn't the first one at the park, though- I saw a few other folks heading out on the trail with buckets in hand as I pulled into the parking lot off 5000 N Rd. Although I have been to Mazonia about 6 times in the last 5 years, I am still finding my way around the overgrown landscape of the park. I started out with an area I had been to before, and had some early success. Unfortunately, I followed that by wandering off to explore a new area, lugging my heavy bucket through heavy brush for 2 hours with almost no success. That (and the fact that I was in the early stages of a head cold) led me to taking it easy in the afternoon. I was only able to add a few more concretions to my bucket, but the sun did peek out briefly towards the end of the day resulting in some lovely panoramas from up on top of a ridge. I was able to chat briefly with another fossil hunter when I got back to the parking lot about the joys and tribulations of fossil hunting at Mazonia- we discussed the hard work necessary in order to have a chance to open an incredible window into a 300 million year old world, and how we wouldn't trade that chance for anything. I finished the day at the former tipple on the western side of the park, wide open ridges of dumped waste from the former mine that remain inhospitable to plant life to this day. It is an alien looking world, and usually has not been a great spot for finding fossils. However, it is easy to access at least and I was actually happy to come across a few rough bark impressions in sandstone that I picked up. The sun was getting low, so I decided to call it a day. I only collected about 1 1/2 gallons of concretions, but I was still glad I could get out to the park and find something. I will put my finds in the next post.
  16. Byrozoan of some sort?

    Only found one like this in my area, know what it might be? Thanks a lot! (Sorry inches is all I have measurement wise)
  17. Carboniferous plant suggestions

    This should be an easy one for the plant people here. I'm looking for some suggested id's for this Pennsylvanian/Bashkirian/Namurian plant fragment. Length is 10cm or 4 inches. I find lots of fragments of these which I usually ignore but haven't seen the bifurcating pattern in the lower part of the picture before. I hope that will make id easier.
  18. Rock or fossil

    Hey guys! Total newb here, I was hunting for some Pennsylvanian brachs when I found these strange looking circular halves.(they don’t go together) Could they be fossils or are they just plain old rocks? My vote is just plain rocks.
  19. I knew it was going to snow today, so I thought that I would go out yesterday to a Pennsylvanian roadcut that has matrix from the Bond Formation exposed near Oglesby, Illinois. I did not spend much time there, put it was nice to be out. The area still has a lot of snow cover because it sits in the shade most of the day and there will even have more since we are getting 2-3”. Besides some brachiopods that I found, I also found this Cladodont Tooth that was on the bottom of a piece that I picked up. Though not complete, I still like it. Thanks to @deutscheben and @Peat Burns for the ID.
  20. Last fall the state of Illinois purchased over 2,600 acres near the town of Oglesby from Lone Star Industries, including former quarries, with the goal of making it into state park land. It is near the site of the popular Starved Rock and Matthiessen State Parks, and the state said it would take a few years to assess and prepare the site before it would be open to the public. http://www.newstrib.com/free/matthiessen-and-starved-rock-just-got-a-lot-bigger-video/article_203e37f8-d89a-11e8-9a7e-e72ef52ec0d6.html The quarry exposes the highly fossiliferous LaSalle Limestone, as well as a black shale that produces fossils too, so a number of scientists and fossil enthusiasts proposed that a portion of the new protected land should be made into a public fossil park- here is their proposal: https://www.esconi.org/files/proposal-for-a-fossil-park-at-the-former-lone-star-quarry-site-final.pdf Now a state legislator representing the area has introduced a bill to do just that- the synopsis reads: "Amends the Department of Natural Resources (Conservation) Law of the Civil Administrative Code of Illinois. Provides that the Department of Natural Resources shall designate a portion of the former Lone Star Quarry site near Oglesby as a fossil park to allow for the collection of fossils. Provides that Department by rule may designate which portion of the land shall constitute the fossil park and any requirements for admittance or permits for entry into the fossil park. Provides that the Department may collaborate with any State university to establish educational opportunities or events at the fossil park." Hopefully this will become a law and this park can join the famous Mazonia-Braidwood as Illinois's second park for fossil collecting. If you are an Illinois resident, please contact your state representative and tell them to sign on as co-sponsor or support this bill!
  21. Plate of armor?

    Hey guys! I was in one of my favorite Pennsylvanian spots in East Kansas finding the usual brachs and bryos when all of a sudden this popped out at me. Any ideas as to what it might be? I’ve never seen something like this in my area before. Thanks.
  22. Hi all, I recently made a trip out to Wilson Clay Pit in Brownwood, Texas with my local paleo society. I've found several recognizable things, and a few I need some help identifying. I apologize in advance to @erose who gave me an idea on one bivalve that I failed to write down, and thereafter promptly forgot! I think the tooth is Petalodus sp., just need confirmation. I'd love a genus for the clams, and I have no idea at all what the small plate-shaped fossil is. Thanks!
  23. Recently completed a lengthy set of walkabouts in the lower Pennsylvanian. I have a lot that I can pseudo-identify and am comfortable leaving them alone for now. OTH, I am hopeful someone with the skills will provide some helpful nudges in assigning more accurate names to the following: I believe this is a coral. This is about 4" tall and 3.5" wide Zoom in I'm calling it a snail but I know that is not correct. Max length is 1.5" And then these mystery spine-like objects on a sort of mash plate. It is hard to tell but the long intermittent one, swooping from lower left to upper right, maybe indeed be a single long strand 3" long
  24. I decided to take the day off of work today because it was supposed to be in the mid 40's and I figured I could whack open some Mazon Creek concretions. I was very nice out, but I figured that my time would be better spent cutting down matrix on a number of pieces that I collected recently from 3 different time periods (Pennsylvanian, Mississippian and Ordovician). I did not get everything cut down, but it was a good start, here is the aftermath. Pennsylvanian- Sometimes things just pop out of the matrix like the two beauties Ordovician- Mississippian-
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