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Found 542 results

  1. This looks arthropod, but what is it?

    This specimen is from the Pennsylvanian subsystem, Kansas City group, and probably the Winterset member. I say probably because I collected it several years ago and I'm not sure. If it is not from Winterset, then it is from a some other nearby member in the Kansas City Group. It seems that the only arthropods in the Winterset are trilobytes, so I'm thinking that this is not arthropod, even though it has that superficial appearance. Can you folks help me identify it?
  2. Hi, all, does anyone know where I can get/order some posters showing the Pennsylvanian forests? I am doing a presentation on plant fossils in Jan. and would like to accent it with art work, thanks, Herb
  3. I think I found myself a partial crinoid calyx in some micro matrix. Pennsylvanian period, Jasper Creek fm, Bridgeport, Texas. Measuring just 1.5 cm in length plus another tiny cluster that may be part of another. So I'm posting both on here for more learned opinions. The 2nd one is a bit smaller, measuring only .5 cm in length. I'd like to find an entire calyx (or an entire critter). I seem to have become partial to crinoids for some reason.
  4. Another microfossil

    Found this in the micro matrix. I know I've seen one before, but I can't place it. I also wish I could get the matrix off it, but it's so thin.. Anywho, it's 0.5 cm at the widest.
  5. 26054-38060-1-SM.pdf Here is a paper by Itano and Lucas about a revision of Camyloprion Eastman, 1902 that includes new teeth found by Mark McKinzie in the Finis Shale member of the Jacksboro Limestone at Jacksboro's Lost Creek site.
  6. Arizona Pennsylvanian Coral

    The corals from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation in Arizona have not been officially described partly because many are silicified and have lost internal details. Any idea what these corals are with central columns that are vertically striated? Their average length is 2 to 3 cm. I think that they look like Lophophyllidium. Thanks, John
  7. Mazon Creek ID

    An unknown I found at Braidwood, IL, Mazon Creek material. Forgot scale but about 2" wide and 1" long. It was in a marine area.
  8. Any idea what these silicified possible crinoids are? Are they even crinoids? They are from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation from near Payson. The ones in the photos (both sides are shown) are from 0.8 to 1.5 cm wide. @crinus These two references might be of help. Anyone have access to the photos from these? Webster, G., & Olson, T. (1998). Nacocrinus elliotti, a New Pachylocrinid from the Naco Formation (Pennsylvanian, Desmoinesian) of Central Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, 72(3), 510-512. Webster, Gary; Elliott, David. (2004). New information on crinoids (Echinodermata) from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation of central Arizona. The Mountain Geologist. 41. 77-86.
  9. Jacksboro Texas Plants

    I showed Jeffery P the Jacksboro spillway on his swing through Texas and it was my day to find plants in this otherwise marine site. At least I think that both are plants. First this piece with mm scale which I'm guessing could be Cordaites or Artisia pith. Edge view and close-up and other side Next this leaf which I think is one of the seed fern pinnules, also with mm scale other side end views and side views Does anyone agree and can you tell which of the seed ferns this could be?
  10. Edestus teeth

    From the album Sharks and fish

    The shark relative is genus of eugenodontia holocephalid from the Carboniferous-Pennsylvanian age Anna shale formation, Carbondale group, found in different Illinois coal mines. I dont know(yet)which mine these were found in. This unidentified species is of the "vorax-serratus- crenulatus-heinrichi" or "E. heinrichi group", with the teeth being more of a standard triangular shape, as opposed to being thinner and pointed at a forward angle as in the "E. minor" group http://www.thefossilforum.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=501751
  11. Crinoid Cup and Arms

    From the album Mineral Wells, Texas

  12. Crinoids

    From the album Mineral Wells, Texas

  13. Crinoid

    From the album Mineral Wells, Texas

  14. Crinoid in matrix

    From the album Mineral Wells, Texas

  15. Crinoid in matrix

    From the album Mineral Wells, Texas

  16. Trilobite

    From the album Mineral Wells, Texas

  17. Trilobite

  18. I was a lucky recipient of a wonderfully CRAPPY package from @Nimravis a couple of months ago. Now I need some educating. 1. The only recognizable inclusions in this coprolite are plant fragments, most of which appear to be woody debris. There is one relatively intact "leaf?" that may be recognizable to some of you experienced Mazon Creek folks. My educated guess is it is from a lycopod. Can anyone confirm this. From what I have read, the only herbivores large enough to have produced a mass of this size are Arthropleura, the giant millipede arthropods. How exciting is that!?! 2. This one looks like some sort of stem fragment. Would this be from a lycopod as well?
  19. I need some more help getting the right name for some pieces of goniatites from Jacksboro. I think these are the same because of one similar feature in particular. I would like to be sure since these will be with the rest of my Jacksboro collection in a temporary display at the Heard Museum in McKinney Texas dedicated to amateur collecting. These range from 20 to 50mm in size. The whorl is somewhat compressed with a rounded venter and faint tubercles on the umbilical margin especially on the smaller ones. The sutures are not complete enough for a good ID based on that. You can see transverse, flexuous lirae here and here and longitudinal lirae somewhat like "Agathiceras" seen last as I rotate it through in these three views here producing a cross-hatch pattern visible here
  20. Pennsylvanian Goniatite from Texas

    I'm having trouble getting the right name for this tiny Goniatite from Jacksboro Texas. Upper Pennsylvanian, Finis Shale Member of the Graham Formation. Small at only 7mm.
  21. My dad and I recently took a trip to collect plant fossils at two locales near Centralia, PA. Given that St. Clair is no longer accessible to collecting, we found that this area offered the next best option for collecting similar fossil ferns. We came away with a lot of large samples of Calamites sp., including several pith casts that just fell out of the rock. We also found a fair amount of Annularia, Neuropteris, and Pecopteris. Here are only a few of our best finds. I hope you enjoy. If you disagree on an identification, please let me know; I am still trying to identify everything. Some Neuropteris from Centralia What looks to be the bark of Sigillaria
  22. Pennsylvanian Plant Identification

    I collected at a deposit yesterday near Locust Gap, PA and came back with several plant fossils, including this unknown bark. My initial thought is that it of calamites sp. but the gap between the striations is much larger than what I ordinarily associate with calamites. The first two photos are of the unknown bark and the third photo is of what I know to be calamites. I hope you can see the difference.
  23. Paleozoic Adventures in Arizona

    Here are photos of two trips taken to look for Paleozoic fossils in northern Gila County in northern Arizona. Daily thunderstorms and plentiful shade made the 90 deg. + temperatures bearable. I ran into TFF member ArizonaChris while in the area. In the Martin Formation I found interesting stromatoporoids, now determined to be sponges, that were important reef forming organisms during the Late Devonian. Pine needles for scale. Here are some silicified Martin Formation brachiopods. Nearby are many caves and sinks in the fossiliferous limestones of the Martin and Redwall Formations: up to 100 miles of passages according to a caver. The first one is full of junk metal including two cars. Any idea what the cars are? Here is Tin Can Sink. To be continued.
  24. Today turned out to be a good day to go through Linton Cannel Coal. I haven't searched the fossil coal in a while. Just for fun, I was looking through some blocks when I spotted a shark spine buried in a thin layer of spore cannel. Usually when I split the coal, I use a knife, but this piece was so thin and fragile I decided to blow of the layer with an air nozzle. When I did this, not only did I see a spine, but nearly a complete Shark was there. Typically the size of the coal block limits the fossil size. Today's fossil Orthacanthus compressus was missing the head and the tip of the tail. Sigh. This shark is from a coal mine in SE Ohio. The coal is Upper Pennsylvanian in age (300 myo). I have included a sketch of what an Orthacanthus may have looked like.
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