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Found 186 results

  1. Petrified Wood Find

    I found this nice petrified wood specimen while collecting in the early Cretaceous Potomac Group sediments in Washington DC recently. It is pretty well preserved for this unit, with nice surface features, knots, and growth lines present on it.
  2. Hey all, So I have a decent collection of mineral specimens from Oklahoma. Now, I'm getting into fossilized wood. I had the opportunity to dig at a ranch near the Petrified Forest National Park a couple weeks ago and made out with a very nice haul. I have some questions... 1. What is the best method for cleaning the wood? 2. One of my small stumps has a very sizable open cavity of quartz. What is the best way to clean this specimen? Oxalic acid? It should turn out very stunning. 3. Any tips for a newbie on collecting fossil wood? I am about 1/4 of the way through Frank Daniels' new book on fossil wood, and it is amazing! Russ
  3. Five New Fossil Forests Found in Antarctica Hundreds of millions of years ago, Antarctica was carpeted with prehistoric greenery. Now, scientists may have uncovered clues about what happened in the "Great Dying," or Permian extinction. National Geographic https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/antarctica-fossil-forest-discovery-permian-spd/ A related paper is: Taylor, E.L., Taylor, T.N. and Cúneo, N.R., 1992. The present is not the key to the past: a polar forest from the Permian of Antarctica. Science, 257(5077), pp. 1675-1677. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/5999746_The_Present_Is_Not_the_Key_to_the_Past_A_Polar_Forest_from_the_Permian_of_Antarctica https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ruben_Cuneo/2 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ruben_Cuneo Yours, Paul H.
  4. A tree sprout???

    well i have the day off so i might as well throw another one at you all. I found this next to the largest petrified tree stump I have ever seen. It came from the north fork of the Shoshone river about seven miles from Yellowstone Park. I haven't seen anything quite like it. I think it looks like a sprout of some kind. Has anyone any seen something like this?
  5. Hello everyone, I'm from Belgium and currently tasked with securing a secondary fossil collection owned by the grandfather of my husband. We are emptying an attic, and securing quite a number of fossils. Many of them already have an ID, some of them however lack one. Apologies in advance for the poor quality of pictures, there is little to no light/electricity inside the rooms we need to vacate, so picture quality will be appalling at first. I am aiming for a basic ID here, if possible I might be able to provide more detailed pictures once the fossils have been properly packed and moved. #1 : Could this be a dinosaur egg? #2: vertebrae of different sizes + plate of petrified wood in the background. Looking for possible ID on these vertebrae. #3: Petrified wood, which type? #4 : Small crustacean? #5: Fossilized shell from morocco? #6: Partial fossilized jaw? #7: Belemnoidea, the two in the front? (they seem to be very large).
  6. I recently went rock collecting in the Calico Mountains just off the 15, 10 miles E of Barstow. In the book I have, it mentions petrified wood, specifically date palm or date palm root. Is this it? The pics were taken after I scrubbed these in water with a toothbrush.
  7. Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the stem tissue. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three-dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment or volcanic ash and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the covering material deposits minerals in the plant's cells; as the plant's lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mold forms in its place. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely. A forest where such material has petrified becomes known as a petrified forest. Kingdom: Plantae
  8. Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the stem tissue. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three-dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment or volcanic ash and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the covering material deposits minerals in the plant's cells; as the plant's lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mold forms in its place. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely. A forest where such material has petrified becomes known as a petrified forest. Kingdom: Plantae
  9. Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the stem tissue. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three-dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment or volcanic ash and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the covering material deposits minerals in the plant's cells; as the plant's lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mold forms in its place. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely. A forest where such material has petrified becomes known as a petrified forest. Kingdom: Plantae
  10. Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the stem tissue. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three-dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment or volcanic ash and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the covering material deposits minerals in the plant's cells; as the plant's lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mold forms in its place. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely. A forest where such material has petrified becomes known as a petrified forest. Kingdom: Plantae
  11. Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the stem tissue. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three-dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment or volcanic ash and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the covering material deposits minerals in the plant's cells; as the plant's lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mold forms in its place. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely. A forest where such material has petrified becomes known as a petrified forest. Kingdom: Plantae
  12. Hello, Im new to this forum, but im trying to find some petrified wood. Its going to be part of a pen I make for my dad, The main body of the pen will be petrified wood, the center band will be made out of meteorite, there will be a small moldavite tektite jewel on the clasp, and the metal will be plated with iridium. So as far as I know it will b the only one of its kind so im very excited to start but im wanting to practice using petrified wood before I actually start making the pen, I heard there is a place in or near Houston that you can find petrified wood, If it helps I live near Humble Thanks guys and happy hunting
  13. Hello! I've just swapped for some fossils, from eastern Nebraska, Cuming County. I suspect the shells are inoceramus - What do you think? There is also Petrified Wood - Any idea on age? It is agatized, it seems. These were from a dragline-type operation - Mammal fossils are also found.... I attach a photo of my Mammoth tooth, from the same area. I have searched for data to no avail! So, firstly, what are the shell fossils? I think perhaps inoceramus. But what era? Secondly - The petrified wood - a time period would be helpful if possible. Thirdly - The Mammoth Tooth - Is my ID correct? Mammoth Tooth - Mammuthus columbi 0.00 12/18/2017 Chris Stalp (trade) West Point, Cumings County, Nebraska Late Pleistocene - (About 25 thousand years old) The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) is an extinct species of mammoth that inhabited North America as far north as the northern United States and as far south as Costa Rica during the Pleistocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with M. subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The Columbian mammoth evolved from the steppe mammoth, which entered North America from Asia about 1.5 million years ago. The pygmy mammoths of the Channel Islands of California evolved from Columbian mammoths. The closest extant relative of the Columbian and other mammoths is the Asian elephant. Columbian mammoths had four functional molar teeth at a time, two in the upper jaw and two in the lower. About 23 cm (9.1 in) of the crown was within the jaw, and 2.5 cm (1 in) was above. The crown was pushed forward and up as it wore down, comparable to a conveyor belt. The teeth had separated ridges of enamel, which were covered in "prisms" directed towards the chewing surface. Wear-resistant, they were held together with cementum and dentin. A mammoth's molars were replaced five times over the animal's lifetime. The first molars were about the size of those of a human, 1.3 cm (0.51 in); the third were 15 cm (5.9 in) long, and the sixth were about 30 cm (1 ft) long and weighed 1.8 kg (4 lb). With each replacement, the molars grew larger and gained more ridges; the number of plates varied between individuals. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: Elephantidae Tribe: Elephantini Genus: †Mammuthus Species: †columbi
  14. Looks like petrified wood chips?

    Our class found these along the creek walls that border the school's property. They look like large petrified wood chips, but we are wondering if you can tell us what they might be. Part of the schools property is considered preserved wetlands. This might be a reason these are here.
  15. Posting for a friend

    Found in a field in northwest Arkansas. Said they have come across a few of them in the area. Dan
  16. indonesia fossil wood a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood - Indonesia SITE LOCATION: Indonesia (Banten and also in some part of Mount Halimun Salak National Park - probably Genteng Formation) TIME PERIOD: Miocene era (20 million years ago) This is a petrified piece of Tropical Hardwood. Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the stem tissue. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three-dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment or volcanic ash and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the covering material deposits minerals in the plant's cells; as the plant's lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mold forms in its place. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely. A forest where such material has petrified becomes known as a petrified forest. Petrified wood can preserve the original structure of the stem in all its detail, down to the microscopic level. Structures such as tree rings and the various tissues are often observed features. Petrified wood is a fossil in which the organic remains have been replaced by minerals in the slow process of being replaced with stone. This petrification process generally results in a quartz chalcedony mineralization. Special rare conditions must be met in order for the fallen stem to be transformed into fossil wood or petrified wood. In general, the fallen plants get buried in an environment free of oxygen (anaerobic environment), which preserves the original plant structure and general appearance. The other conditions include a regular access to mineral rich water in contact with the tissues, replacing the organic plant structure with inorganic minerals. The end result is petrified wood, a plant, with its original basic structure in place, replaced by stone. Exotic minerals allow the red and green hues that can be seen in rarer specimens. Kingdom: Plantae
  17. indonesia fossil wood a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood - Indonesia SITE LOCATION: Indonesia (Banten and also in some part of Mount Halimun Salak National Park - probably Genteng Formation) TIME PERIOD: Miocene era (20 million years ago) This is a petrified piece of Tropical Hardwood. Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the stem tissue. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three-dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment or volcanic ash and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the covering material deposits minerals in the plant's cells; as the plant's lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mold forms in its place. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely. A forest where such material has petrified becomes known as a petrified forest. Petrified wood can preserve the original structure of the stem in all its detail, down to the microscopic level. Structures such as tree rings and the various tissues are often observed features. Petrified wood is a fossil in which the organic remains have been replaced by minerals in the slow process of being replaced with stone. This petrification process generally results in a quartz chalcedony mineralization. Special rare conditions must be met in order for the fallen stem to be transformed into fossil wood or petrified wood. In general, the fallen plants get buried in an environment free of oxygen (anaerobic environment), which preserves the original plant structure and general appearance. The other conditions include a regular access to mineral rich water in contact with the tissues, replacing the organic plant structure with inorganic minerals. The end result is petrified wood, a plant, with its original basic structure in place, replaced by stone. Exotic minerals allow the red and green hues that can be seen in rarer specimens. Kingdom: Plantae
  18. Termite coprolites

    I have a chunk of a log about 30 lb, and it is covered with literally thousands of termite coprolites . I'm going to try and get a picture I was wondering what you guys thought.
  19. North Texas Petrified Wood

    Does anyone know the source and age of the petrified wood found at Lake Lavon and North Sulphur River both NE of Dallas, Texas? shel67 found a piece of yellow palm wood from the North Sulphur River (NSR). http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/76090-i-need-help-with-this-one-from-the-north-sulphur-river/&tab=comments#comment-820122 I found a similiar piece at NSR that I thought might be palm or Snakewood along with many pieces of wood with distinct growth rings. I have also found petrified wood with distinct growth rings along the shore of Lake Lavon. All the petrified wood looks more recent, Eocene and newer, since palms and trees with distinct growth rings are not present in the marine Cretaceous rocks of north Texas and those types of wood are much more common in post Cretaceous rocks throughout the US. The currents watersheds of NSR and Lake Lavon include formations of Pleistocene alluvium, river deposits and mostly limely, clay to sand-sized, marine, late Cretaceous sediments. Eocene and newer rocks with wood are found upsection in south Texas and west in the Texas panhandle. See this map with the geology of the area (Texas geology map Sherman Sheet): https://www.twdb.texas.gov/groundwater/aquifer/GAT/sherman.htm Has anyone seen similiar in situ pieces of silicified wood in the Austin and Taylor Group rocks of north Texas? I have not. I doubt the wood is Pleistocene since you would expect to find larger, less rounded pieces from such recent deposits. There would not be enough time to petrify the wood, erode the formation and weather all the wood into small rounded pieces. Plus, nearby volcanic activity (and deposits) often is needed to provide a source of silica for the petrifaction. Little activity has occured during the Pleistocene in that area. I have two theories of where the wood came from. 1) The usually well rounded petrified wood found in the Pleistocene deposits represents reworked lag deposits from the post Cretaceous rocks that have since been eroded away. 2) The river drainages have changed. The wood was carried by former rivers that drained areas with Eocene and newer rocks from distant parts. Any other good theories?
  20. Ich begann Fossilien mit Wirbeltieren, manchmal meinen Freund und ich fanden wir fossile Pflanzen zu sammeln. Aber die Pflanzenfossilien haben weniger Bedeutung als die Fische und Amphibien, acanthodians und Haie ........ Jahre später wurde ich ein Gärtner, absolvierte die Meisterschule und bat mich nur die Frage ... wie es tat alle Start ? Wann haben halten die ersten Pflanzen, den Kopf aus dem Wasser und das noch leblose Land bevölkern? Ich über das Internet gestöbert, die ich zum ersten Mal gefunden - Rhynia ..... und ähnlichen Pflanzen wie Psilophyton ... hatte nun plötzlich die ersten Funde aus der Perm Bedeutung, das Puzzle wuchs, wächst weiter ... ist jedes Fossil ein Wunder wie zerbrechlich Pflanzen sein können, wie wunderbar, wenn wir sie als Fossilien finden. ..... Dann zog ich, jetzt in der Mitte des Devon und haben einen berühmten Ort der Referenz vor der Tür ... Pflanzen von Alken an der Mosel! Ich fand einige Pflanzen wie Psilophyton und sah einige Sammler für Trilobiten Jagd ... die Pflanzen weggeworfen worden war, .... vielleicht wissen, dass sie Artikel nicht darüber !!! Schade für sie - was für ein Segen für mich!
  21. I started collecting fossils with vertebrates, sometimes my friend and me we found fossil plants. But the plant fossils have less importance than the fish and amphibians, acanthodians and sharks ........ years later I became a gardener, graduated from the master school and asked me only the question ... how did it all start? When did the first plants keep the head out of the water and populate the still inanimate land? I rummaged through the internet, which I found first - Rhynia ..... and similar plants as Psilophyton ... now had suddenly the first finds of the Perm meaning, the puzzle grew, still growing ... every fossil is a Wonders how fragile plants can be, how wonderful, if we can find them as fossils. ..... Then I moved, now in the middle of the Devon and have a famous place of reference before the door ... Plants of Alken on the Moselle! I found some plants like Psilophyton and saw some collectors hunting for Trilobites...the plants had been thrown away,....perhaps they didn´t know about it!!! Pity for them - what a blessing for me !
  22. My wife and I are headed to a wedding in Denver this weekend. I know its short notice but any locals have any suggestions or hot spots for some petrified wood or some fossils? I am already planning a trip to Florissant for the pay dig shale splitting for a few hours. And I have found a lot of possible petrified wood spots but don't know how much time I have to be scouting uncharted territories. And of course I am not going to say no to any good fossil spots either. I do have tumblers and rock saws so the petrified wood is really on my radar. I do have the Rockhounding Colorado book too but thought I would reach out to the locals on this one. Thanks! Chris
  23. Newbie with an ID request

    Hi there! I'm new here although I've been into fossils since I was a youngster! I managed to grab the following example on the south coast of Kent in the UK which is known for fossilised wood and footprints and bones etc. I thought it might be a fossilised tree limb or small trunk. What do you think? Any guidance very gratefully received! Thanks so much
  24. Rock cutting near houston?

    Hey yall, I'm new here so not sure if this is the appropriate place to ask this. Wasn't sure where else to ask. I have a few rocks(septarian nodules) some large, some small that I need to get cut. The largest is about 12" long and 6" wide. Does anyone know how or where I can go about getting these cut? I've thought about using a wet tile saw but I have a feeling I would need a rather large one. I don't want to spend money buying one as I would only need it for about 5-6 rocks, but would be willing to pay someone if need be for the services to cut them. If this is the wrong place to ask, could someone direct me in the right direction? Thanks a bunch!
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