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Found 186 results

  1. I found another new site for Triassic petrified wood in Pennsylvania. I am sure this location has never been hunted. The following specimens are very similar to what I've found elsewhere in PA Triassic. Scale bar is 4 inches (10+ cm).
  2. I found more petrified (silicified) wood at a new site in the Triassic Newark Supergroup of S.E. Pennsylvania. Almost all specimens show good grain patterns and are a nice dark chocolate color. Yummy. Attached is a photo of the larger specimens that I collected. The scale bar is 4 inches. (I have posted other similar pet wood photos in previous topics.)
  3. Dinosaur Forests Mapped

    Dinosaur forests mapped by Adele Rackley http://planetearth.n...ry.aspx?id=1170 Earth was Stifling Hot During Peak Age of Dinosaurs The Daily Galaxy, February 28, 2012, http://www.dailygala...inosaurs-1.html Dinosaurs roamed among pine trees in the Arctic 100 million years ago, scientists reveal, Mail Online February 28, 2012, ( has colored maps ) http://www.dailymail...sts-reveal.html The paper is: Peralta-Medina, E., and H. J. Falcon-Lang, 2012, Cretaceous forest composition and productivity inferred from a global fossil wood database. Geology. vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 219-222. http://geology.gsapu.../3/219.abstract PDF file at: http://royalholloway.academia.edu/EmilianoPeraltaMedina/Papers/1473624/Cretaceous_forest_composition_and_productivity_inferred_from_a_global_fossil_wood_database Best wishes, Paul H.
  4. Aloha, I was given a chunk of petrified wood as a gift and I have been trying to get it identified and appraised. So far no luck ;0( In my very amateur review (from reading through tons of petrified wood websites) I think it could possibly be a vesseless hardwood ... but I don't have a magnifying glass strong enough to be sure (not to mention the education :-P). I am hoping at the very least someone can point me in the direction for how/who to identify the wood and then get it appraised. I am attaching photos to this post. It is 15.5 pounds and 10 1/8 in x 8 1/8 in x 4 1/2 in. Thank you for your time and energy! Blessings, Jenn
  5. For Those Into Petrified Wood

    Hello all, This is a paper that my adviser just had published on early boring activity of beetles. Pretty good read if your into petrified wood or early insects. http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0031668
  6. Pa Triassic Wood

    I found some more petrified wood in the Triassic Newark supergroup in Pennsylvania. 2 big chunks, a light chocolate brown color. And many smaller pieces. The photos are in these first 3 posts. This first, largest specimen measures 16x12x6 inches (41x30x15 centimeters). (Inch and centimeter scales are on the ruler in the photos.)
  7. To Be Mazon Or Not To Be Mazon?

    Here is a good cross section of my "Mazon Creek" fossils, if you find yourself second guessing the "Mazon Creek" please post. I purchased these, I did not find them myself, so they could be mislabeled. I am self taught, so I could very well have all of my ID's wrong. This will have to be a 4 part message, due to the fact I can only upload 8 pics at one time.
  8. i found this very beautiful piece of petrified wood w/ very clear petrified charcoal in it way out near the point beyond the largest runway in alameda point, alameda, ca. this area was fill brought in to create the us navy base before wwII. i found it about a year ago and believe that it was brought here in fill from another location sometime before wwII. i find the very clear and mineralized black charcoal on the piece to be very fascinating and unusual. anyone else? also does anyone dare venture a guess as to where the fill in which it was deposited came from? lots of nice sandstone pieces which have created beautiful examples of tafoni. i haven't found any other fossils there though. also, i recently found a sizable crack in the center of the fossil and i'd like to stabilize it before it breaks open. any suggestions to stabilize it? thanks in advance for any insight you may have about this beautiful and unusual fossil. to see photos of the petrified wood, go to: http://flic.kr/s/aHsjwSCtmS pete veilleux oakland, ca
  9. "Petrified", permineralized, silicified wood from Triassic Newark supergroup in Pennsylvania. Probably Araucarioxylon; same genus as in Arizona Petrified Forest national park. Some specimens have dark lignite on surface. For scale: silver discs in photo are USA quarter coins (0.995 inch or 2.42 centimeters in diameter).
  10. A Humerus Trip

    August 15, 2009 It all started on a small, secluded Texas waterway in the Jungle of Gigantism (you know better than to ask), we watched a log submerge with purpose... but, it was no log. Big reptiles were only a hint of the giant to come. Shortly afterward, we pulled into the bank and my friend Dan offered, "you want upstream or downstream?" Words he later said would influence a fossil career. It was 7:45 in the morning. I headed downstream to low gravel ledge. Within a short time, I found an unusual shaped bone, a little over a foot long, wedged into the bank. It turned out to be a limb bone of a giant sloth! It even had gravelly sandstone attached to it. I laid my paddle beside it and continued to search the ledge. Finding nothing else, I thought that I should check out where the ledge dropped into the water...and there it was. A dinner plate-sized dome edged from the steep face, halfway down to the water. To the casual observer, it would seem to be another rock, but the shape resonated in my consciousness - bone...big bone. Sloth bone I returned to the first bone and took a few in situ photos. Dan was working his way back toward the boat about 100 yards away. He hollered out that he was going to check out the opposite bank. I signaled a 'thumbs up', and decided to call my wife. I excitedly told her that we were well underway on our expedition, and that I had just found a good sized limb bone. I also told her that I might have found something BIG, and that I'd get in touch with her later. While Dan continued to wander the opposite gravel bar, I dropped over the ledge to take a few photos of the "dome" in the face of the bank. "Hey Dan, you need to come over here. I want your opinion on something." I grinned inside; there were logistics to work out....my mind was racing! We had over 2 dozen miles to travel...in Dan's nearly maxed out two man kayak. This was going to get interesting.... Proximal "dome" exposed on bank face I spent the next several minutes going over the entire area again. The reason was twofold: I needed to work off some adrenalin, and it's easy to miss something when you're that hyped up. Dan finally arrived, and I guided him to the first bone. He reacted, "Whoa! That's significant! It looks like sloth to me." "I found something else," I replied. We scrambled over the bank and dropped into the mud below the small ledge. "What do you think this is?" I grinned. His eyes went wide and he started rubbing some of the dirt off the dome to get a better look at the details. We both shook our heads in awe. I scooped up some water and splashed it over the dome. Dan rubbed it like there was a genie inside. We both took a closer look, then shook our heads in amazement...BONE! I was a little closer to one of my dreams of finding another fossil giant. We started digging...and the apparent became more obvious as the end of a massive bone slowly emerged from the soil. Suddenly, I turned to Dan, "Did you hear that?" "No; what?" "I hear a boat coming." Now, we are a bit protective of productive fossil sites, but the fishermen (that we eventually engaged in conversation) appeared to be friendly enough. It seems that a dentist, a chiropractor, and their friend wanted to do some fishing. They were also looking for some pieces of petrified wood, so we quickly obliged them with the location of a few large pieces we found upstream. A little later, they returned. We had just extracted the first few pieces of the bone. The largest was close to a saturated 60 lbs. In the time they had been upstream, Dan and I analyzed the transport logistics and boat capacity...we knew we had a dilemma. There was no way we could haul all of this bone more than 20 miles. So, we struck a deal on more fossil wood while I took down some phone numbers and a calculated risk. I placed the large proximal end securely into a corner of the floor of their boat. They thanked us for the wood, and we agreed to meet at a location downstream later in the day. Even with the phone numbers and brief rapport, I winced as they slowly rounded the bend. With a deep breath, I forced the what ifs from my mind; we still had a large piece of bone in the bank. After two and a half hours of bruising, bloody digging into clay and gravel with improvised rock hammers and knives, Dan and I lifted out the final piece of the monster bone. This joint confirmed which part of the skeleton I had found. The "dome" turned out to be the proximal end of a nearly complete Columbian Mammoth humerus (top of the front leg)! It had angled directly back into the bank. Although fractured into several pieces, it was later re-assembled to be just over 48 inches long and around 120 lbs! It's massive and huge! Author badgering the bone Dan working to free the distal end ...Back in the water, we had to rearrange some things on the kayak to achieve proper trim. Tentatively, and with a little fine tuning, we continued our journey downstream. Several hours later, we passed our waterborne associates, and told them we would see them later. Along the way further downstream, we stopped periodically to check likely looking spots for more fossil bone. Occasionally, we would find a large chunk of petrified wood, and stand it up near the water. We hoped to show more goodwill toward our upstream transport team. Author with the distal end Reaching another prime location, we pulled in and started searching. There were many large pieces of fossil wood here, so we stacked them up. With a flash of insight, I reminded Dan that we weren't far from a nearby road. If I could persuade the fishermen to take me and the rest of the bone a short distance further downstream, then they would be free of any later rendezvous. We could pay them with all the petrified wood, and I would also be free of worry. Then, I could hike the pieces of bone to a hidden spot near the road, and go back to the water where he could pick me up. Dan agreed, and within a short time our plan went into action. I profusely thanked the guys for their assistance and we parted company. Near the road, I scouted the area for a hiding place and promptly secured the fossil treasure. A quick survey from all angles left me confident it would be there later. Soon, Dan came into view upstream, and we were off to see what other bounty awaited us. Several other finds were made that rounded out a spectacular adventure. As we loaded the boat onto my vehicle, darkness soon caught us. By the time we reached my hidden cache and got it loaded, it was 10:30 PM. It had been quite a day! Primary pieces Over 48 inches long Columbian Mammoth humerus Awesome discovery!
  11. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 3, 2018. Kingdom Plantae Floras and Fossil Wood Floras and Fossil Wood - Africa/Middle East Bamford, M.K. (2004). Diversity of the Woody Vegetation of Gondwanan Southern Africa. Gondwana Research, Vol.7, Number 1. Bamford, M.K. (2000). Fossil woods of Karoo age deposits in South Africa and Namibia as an aid to biostratigraphical correlation. Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol.31, Number 1. De Wit, M., M. Bamford and C. Van Waarden (2018). Fossil trees from the basal Triassic Lebung Group at the Makgaba site, west of Mokubilo, Botswana. Palaeont.afr., 52. Gosling, W.D., C.S. Miller and D.A. Livingstone (2013). Atlas of tropical West African pollen flora. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 199. Hashemi, H. (2011). Vascular Cryptogam Plants of the Khoshyeilagh Formation, Northern Shahrud, Eastern Alborz Ranges. Journal of Sciences, Islamic Republic of Iran, 22(4). Kayseri-Ozer, M.S. (2017). Cenozoic vegetation and climate change in Anatolia - A study based on the IPR-vegetation analysis. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 467. Kelber, K.-P., et al. (1992/93). Plant fossils from Gross Brukkaros (Namibia) and their biostratigraphical significance. Communs geol.Surv. Namibia, 8. Krassilov, V. and F. Bacchia (2013). New Cenomanian florule and a leaf mine from southeastern Morocco: Palaeoecological and climatological inferences. Cretaceous Research, 40. Maxbauer, D.P., et al. (2013). A morphotype catalog and paleoenvironmental interpretations of early Miocene fossil leaves from the Hiwegi Formation, Rusinga Island, Lake Victoria, Kenya. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.16, Issue 3. Miller, C.S. and W.D. Gosling (2014). Quaternary forest associations in lowland tropical West Africa. Quaternary Science Reviews, 84. Retallack, G.J. (1992). Middle Miocene fossil plants from Fort Ternan (Kenya) and evolution of African grasslands.Paleobiology, 18(4). Floras and Fossil Wood - Antarctica Birkenmajer, K. and A.M. Ociepa (2008). Plant-bearing Jurassic strata at Hope Bay, Antarctic Peninsula (West Antarctica): geology and fossil-plant description. Studia Geologica Polonica, Vol.128. Cuneo, N.R., et al. (2003). In situ fossil forest from the upper Fremouw Formation (Triassic) of Antarctica: paleoenvironmental setting and paleoclimate analysis. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 197. Eklund, H., D.J. Cantrill and J.E. Francis (2004). Late Cretaceous plant mesofossils from Table Nunatak, Antarctica. Cretaceous Research, 25. Kvacek, J. and J. Sakala (2011). Late Cretaceous flora of James Ross Island (Antarctica) - a preliminary report. Czech Polar Reports, 1(2). Leppe, M., et al. (2007). Paleobotany of Livingston Island: The first report of a Cretaceous fossil flora from Hannah Point. U.S. Geological Survey and The National Academies; USGS OF-2007-1047, Short Research Paper 081. Plumstead, E.P. (1975). A New Assemblage of Plant Fossils from Milorgfjella, Dronning Maud Land. British Antarctic Survey Scientific Reports, Number 83. Poole, I. and D. Cantrill (2001). Fossil Woods from Williams Point Beds, Livingston Island, Antarctica: A Late Cretaceous Southern High Latitude Flora. Palaeontology, Vol.44, Part 6. Poole, I., R.J. Hunt and D.J. Cantrill (2001). A Fossil Wood Flora from King George Island: Ecological Implications for an Antarctic Eocene Vegetation. Annals of Botany, 88. Pujana, R.R., S.A. Marenssi and S.N. Santillana (2015). Fossil woods from the Cross Valley Formation (Paleocene of West Antarctica): Araucariaceae-dominated forests. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 222. Rees, P.M. and C.J. Cleal (2004). Lower Jurassic Floras from Hope Bay and Botany Bay, Antarctica. Special Papers in Palaeontology, Number 72. Tokarski, A.K., W. Danowski and E. Zastawniak (1987). On the age of fossil flora from Barton Peninsula, King George Island, West Antarctica. Polish Polar Research, 8(3). Floras and Fossil Wood - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Asia - Permian Agnihotri, D., et al. (2016). Early Permian Glossopteris flora from the Sharda Open Cast Mine, Sohagpur Coalfield, Shahdol District, Madhya Pradesh. The Palaeobotanist, 65. Asia - Carboniferous Laveine, J.-P., et al. (2009). The Carboniferous flora of northeastern Thailand: additional documentation from the Na Duang-Na Klang basin. Revue de Paléobiologie, Genève, 28(2). Asia - Permian Pfefferkorn, H.W. and J. Wang (2007). Early Permian coal-forming floras preserved as compressions from the Wuda District (Inner Mongolia, China). University of Pennsylvania, Scholarly Commons. van Waveren, I.M., et al. (2007). Composition and palaeogeographic position of the Early Permian Jambi flora from Sumatra. Scripta Geologica, 135. Wei, X., et al. (2016). First report of a phytogeographically mixed (transitional) Middle-Late Permian fossil wood assemblage from the Hami area, northwest China, and implications for Permian phytogeographical, paleogeographical and paleoclimatic evolution in central Asia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 448. Asia - Triassic Tian, N., et al. (2016). New record of fossil wood Xenoxylon from the Late Triassic in the Sichuan Basin, southern China, and its paleoclimatic implications. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 464. Wade-Murphy, J. and J.H.A. van Konijninburg-van Cittert (2008). A revision of the Late Triassic Bintan flora from the Riau Archipelago (Indonesia). Scripta Geologica, 136. Asia - Jurassic Edirisooriya, G. and H.A. Dharmagunawardhane (2013). Plant-Insect Interactions in Jurassic Fossil Flora from Sri Lanka. International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, Vol.3, Issue 1. Hinz, J.K., et al. (2010). A high-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction of a fossil forest (Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation, Junggar Basin, Northwest China). Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, 90(3). (Thanks to doushantuo for pointing this one out!) Pott, C. and B. Jiang (2017). Plant remains from the Middle-Late Jurassic Daohugou site of the Yanliao Biota in Inner Mongolia, China. Acta Palaeobotanica, 57(2). Asia - Cretaceous Chinnappa, C. and A. Rajanikanth (2017). Early Cretaceous flora from the Pranhita-Godavari Basin (east coast of India): taxonomic, taphonomic and palaeoecological considerations. Acta Palaeobotanica, 57(1). Herman, A.B. and A.B. Sokolova (2016). Late Cretaceous Kholokhovchan Flora of Northeast Asia: Composition, age and fossil plant descriptions. Cretaceous Research, 59. Asia - Miocene Leopold, E.B. (1969). Miocene Pollen and Spore Fauna of Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 260-II. Xia, K., et al. (2009). Quantitative climate reconstructions of the late Miocene Xiaolongtan megaflora from Yunnan, southwest China. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 276. Yabe, A. (2008). Plant Megafossil Assemblage from the Lower Miocene Ito-O Formation, Fukui Prefecture, Central Japan. Memoir of the Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, 7. Asia - Pliocene Yamakawa, C., et al. (2017). Composition and paleoenvironment of wetland forests dominated by Glyptostobus and Metasequoia in the latest Pliocene (2.6 Ma) in central Japan. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 467. Asia - General Srivastava, A.K. and R. Srivastava (2010). Insect-plant dynamics in fossil flora of India. Alavesia, 3. Srivastava, G., R.C. Mehrotra and C. Srikarni (2018). Fossil wood flora from the Siwalik Group of Arunachal Pradesh, India and its climatic and phytogeographic significance. J. Earth Syst.Sci., 127: 2. Tiwari, R.P., et al. (2012). The vegetation and climate of a Neogene petrified wood forest of Mizoram, India. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 61. Yokoyama, M. Palaeozoic Plants from China. Journal of the College of Science, Imperial University, Tokyo, Japan, Vol.XXIII, Article 8. Floras and Fossil Wood - Australia/New Zealand Bell, S., H.J. Harrington and I.C. McKellar (1956). Lower Mesozoic Plant Fossils from Black Jacks, Waitaki River, South Canterbury. Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand, Vol.83, Part 4. Christophel, D.C., L.J. Scriven and D.R. Greenwood (1992). An Eocene Megafossil Flora from Nelly Creek, South Australia. Transactions of the Royal Society of S.Aust., 116(2). Fletcher, T.L., P.T. Moss and S.W. Salisbury (2013). Foliar physiognomic climate estimates for the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian-Turonian) Lark Quarry fossil flora, central-western Queensland, Australia. Australian Journal of Botany, 61. Hill, R.S. and M.K. Macphail (1985). A Fossil Flora from Rafted Plio-Pleistocene Mudstones at Regatta Point, Tasmania. Aust.J.Bot., 33. Holmes, W.B.K. and H.M. Anderson (2013). A Synthesis of the Rich Gondwana Triassic Megafossil Flora from Nymboida, Australia. In: The Triassic System. Tanner, L.H., J.A. Spielmann and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 61. Jansson, I.-M., et al. (2008). An Early Jurassic flora from the Clarence-Moreton Basin, Australia. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 150. Jordan, G.J. and R.S. Hill (2002). Cenozoic Plant Macrofossil Sites of Tasmania. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania, 136. Keefe, R.L. (2012). The Brandy Creek fossil flora. Ph.D. Thesis. McLoughlin, S., C. Pott and D. Elliott (2010). The Winton Formation flora (Albian-Cenomanian Eromanga Basin): implications for vascular plant diversification and decline in the Australian Cretaceous. Alcheringa, 34. Retallack, G.J. (1995). An early Triassic fossil flora from Culvida Soak, Canning Basin, Western Australia. Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia, 78. Retallack, G.J. (1985). Triassic fossil plant fragments from shallow marine rocks of the Murihiku Supergroup, New Zealand. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, Vol.15, Number 1. Retallack, G.J. (1977). Reconstructing Triassic vegetation of eastern Australasia: a new approach for the biostratigraphy of Gondwanaland. Alcheringa, 1. Tims, J.D.J. (1980). The Early Land Flora of Victoria. Ph.D. Thesis - University of Melbourne. Floras and Fossil Wood - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Europe - Silurian Edwards, D. (1979). A Late Silurian Flora from the Lower Old Red Sandstone of South-West Dyfed. Palaeontology, Vol.22, Part 1. 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