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Found 187 results

  1. Hi all, My friends recently visited Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia. While they were there they went on a fossil hunt with a geologist who curates the local museum. They were told that they could collect the small, loose stuff, and so brought back plenty of nice fossils. They gave a couple specimens to me, and I’m just wondering about IDing them. There are a lot of Calamites fossils among what they brought back, but I’m having trouble with the rest. I live in the Ordovician and don’t have a lot of experience with Carboniferous flora except finding a few pretties in Pittsburgh. First pic (1) has what they were told is an early seed cone. Can anyone corroborate and specify species? I was looking at Lepidostrobus but the shape seems different. Second pic (2) is one of the fossils they gave me. They thought that the top left might be part of a seed cone but I think it’s Annularia. Thoughts? And are those oval-shaped leaves Pecopteris ? Alethopteris ? And just for fun, I’ll add a couple more pictures (see comments) if anyone wants to have at it. Anyways, thanks!
  2. Plant ID needed from Kentucky

    Hello everyone, I have a small collection that I picked up on a trip to Kentucky...the area around hazard. I think its the Breathitt formation. Pennsylvanian period. I have been in the process of Identifying them. I think I have a decent lock on some of them, but could use a little help on a few. I should add some more photos of 3 and 4. Let me know if you need anything specific (close up on a certain area, or what have you).
  3. Bacchus Marsh Trip

    This weekend I went on another fossil hunting trip with my dad. We went to a place called Bacchus Marsh which is around 65 km east of Melbourne. Here we went looking for Tertiary plant fossils such as Laurus and Cinnamonum. The site was a creek bed under an old bridge. The bridge was located next to the Western Freeway which connects Bacchus Marsh to Melbourne, and extends north to south, eventually emptying into the Werribee river (about 2km away). The creek also goes under the freeway through two tunnels and you can look for fossils on both sides of the freeway, but the side near the bridge had the best rocks. The rocks we looked for were Ferruginous sandstones which are late Paleocene (59 million) to Middle Miocene (14 million). The creek was dry and it didn't look there had been water in it for a long time.
  4. Considering the length of time they lived it seems there are not just too few but unbelievably few species that people have discovered, don't you agree ? Also this leads me to the question which I could not find an answer to in google... that must mean something. How did the biological variety change though the course of the planets history. Is there a way we can know, were there more animal and plant species 1, 10, 100 million years ago?
  5. Russian fossil hunting

    Hello! I want to tell you about my fossil hunting trip in Checkarda canyon. It's located near Perm city, in Ural region. First I flew to Perm from Moscow. After I met my friends and we went to first point of our trip. We decided to reach paleo-site on the boat The russian village avoids after some times We slowly floated downstream and moored near the field. We saw crushed pine, it stayed as label) This place is famous for its plant's fossils (ferns, ginkgo, etc), but I realy wanted insect's fossils.
  6. To the West!

    Due to the current instability of the cliffs, I headed west Sunday. @EMP helped me out with a ton of info, so I knew I could hit a few sites in one day. My dad and I drove to Allegany County and got to Hunting. I messed up the directions so probably didn’t get to the exact site, but I found a few exposures of mid-late Silurian material, probably McKenzie and Tonoloway formations mostly. The yield was a huge amount of ostracods, some brachiopods. My dad saw a strange rock so I climbed some talus and picked it up. Upon closer examination it had not only ostracods, but tentaculitids on it! Think that will be my IFOTM entry. My dad also found a beautiful calcite vug at one of the sites. I saw a bryozoan in one rock but I didn’t pick it up as the rock was too big. No trilobites, but for a few short stops not bad. I encountered some oriskany sandstone near as well, but as those who have hunted in it will know, it’s badly metamorphosed and almost never yields trilobites. After that, I continued to the conemaugh FM, a Carboniferous terrestrial unit. There was a water filled ditch right in front of the outcrop so I had to do some ninja moves over it here and there. The sandstone was mostly barren aside from a few fragments and the shake was too fragile to survive long but nonetheless I made it out with a few nice plant pieces. A day well spent, I returned home, fossils and a few good memories in tow. I haven’t taken many pictures yet, but I will. Here are a few to whet your appetite. Vug and worn ostracods and brachiopods from Tonoloway limestone
  7. "How the Earth Turned Green; or A Brief 3.8 Billion-Year History of Plants" by Joseph E. Armstrong. Brand new book on plant biology and evolution that I bought for myself, but very quickly realized it was over my head. Don't let this scare you, since I am an ABSOLUTE novice to paleontology. I got it on Amazon, so you can go there to see a review of it if you like. I guess the first person to send me a pm saying they want it can have it. But must be in the US due to overseas postage costs.
  8. Book to give away

    If I have a paleontology book that is over my head, therefore "free to good home in the US," where should I post it?
  9. Saturday was a very nice day to hunt in the carboniferous of Northern France
  10. Zdravo to all! Today was quite nice hunting day in Popovac,Serbia. Found so many interesting fossils at my Quarry.This is only just the beginning of a successful season. Hope you will enjoy as always
  11. The Mesozoic is an area that is sorely lacking in my collection. I don't know why, but I just never got around to collecting in it. I never fell in love with dinosaurs or mososaurs like a lot of other people. That was until fairly recently, when I finally took it upon myself to diversify my collection and get to know better my area's (and in some ways own backyard!) geology and paleontology. I set out to discover more about Maryland's Mesozoic Park. I guess it would be best to start off from the beginning. I started the journey not knowing what I'd find, but knowing what it was I hoped to find. I wanted a piece of the hallmark of the Mesozoic, the age of reptiles - my very own Old Line State dinosaur! There was only one problem - I didn't know where to find one. I knew generally what formations to look in, but not where, nor even what to look for. So I took up the ole' Google machine and my own literature at home and started uncovering more about where to start looking. That's what lead me to the first site. A TREK INTO THE TRIASSIC It would be disingenuous to say that I did this all by myself, and I would like to thank @WhodamanHD for helping me out tremendously. Without him I likely never would have gotten this together. For those who don't know, I'll take the liberty to describe the geology of the Free State. In Maryland, the only Triassic aged rocks exposed are those of the Newark Group, here divided by the Maryland Geological Survey into two formations - the New Oxford and the Gettysburg Shale. Both units are exposed in the Culpeper Basin (centered around the town of Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland) and the Gettysburg Basin (centered around, in Maryland, the town of Emmitsburg, Frederick County, Maryland). After several months of searching I was never able to find a good exposure near the famous former quarries around the Seneca region in Montgomery County, which is what lead me to the area near Frederick. Here the Triassic rocks are more readily exposed, with reports of numerous fossil discoveries of dinosaur footprints, plants, fish, and others in the area near Mt. St. Mary's University and Rocky Ridge. The Gettysburg Shale in this region is the most fossiliferous, and that is the one I ended up collecting in. Thanks again to @WhodamanHD for giving me info about the site! I spent a good hour or so at the Gettysburg Shale site, my mind full of images of that amazing Grallator sp. print I'd know I'd find. Unfortunately, as the shadows started growing and the day grew colder, I was forced to give up my quest without any dinosaur specimens from this unit. Still, it was nice to finally be able to collect in it and get to experience these amazing rocks up close and personal. The vast majority of the finds from this site were simple trace fossils of I assume to be annelid worms, these being most common in the glossy looking shale.
  12. https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/science/2018/03/03/did-plants-cause-one-of-earths-great-extinctions/
  13. Calamites?

    This was given to me from a third hand source. I’m only assuming it’s from Illinois—I really don’t know. I supposed it was a calamites horsetail, but I’m seeking confirmation before I catalogue it. Anyone?
  14. Trilobite? and other oddities

    Found these two pieces of rock in a parking lot in Illinois. I would not have expected to see any in these sort of rock, and they seem rather miniralized. One piece looks like hadrosaur skin impressions to my inner 10-year old self, and I figure it’s from some sort of coral. The other looks like a fragment of a calymene trilobite head and thorax. I should that alongside a trilobite for comparison. Thoughts?
  15. Last Monday, February 5th I had the privilege of touring the New York State Museum's enormous fossil collection with the state paleontologist, Lisa Amati. The collection is stored in three rooms on the third floor of the State Education Building in Albany in the same building that contains the New York State Museum. Right now, only a few fossils are displayed in the State Museum which is primarily historical and social in focus. In the lobby is this slab which contains dozens of Middle Devonian starfish- Devonaster.
  16. Museum Basement

    I was asked if I would be willing to help a local history museum by going through their basement and sorting/identifying their fossils so that they may be displayed. I simply do not have the time nor resources to do all of this myself, so I thought I might try to get a little help I will be having a series of posts here, so even if today's is not your forte, you still may have a chance to help out! Today's post is a series of plant fossils that were glued to the inside of a box. When I visited, I neglected to bring a scale or ruler or anything, so for size comparison we have a standard Sharpie. There is nothing identifying where they came from.
  17. Coal mountain

    I went back today to my fav coal mountain (not after war but before Christmas ;)) Santa was very generous before time have a Merry Christmas!
  18. Hello all. New to this forum. I recently found these rocks in the side of a hill that appears to have many layers of shale. About half way up I began to remove pieces of rock and when I flipped on over I noticed the patterns you see in the images I attached. They look like plants but I have zero experience in paleontology. Thank you for checking these out and I apologize for the lack of additional info. If there is any further info that would help determine what these may be, let me know and I will try to add it. Thanks in advance and have a great day!
  19. Hello, This is my first post of this forum and I would like to show you some of my unidentified macro plant spores and vertebrate remains found in residue from fallen bits of plant debris bed picked up at Yaverland IOW, photos were taken under AmScope USB microscope, hope you like them. Still to experiment with the Toupview stacking software, watch this space. The Albaneretontid jaw holds nine teeth, this is the one I hope to get my stacking software working on. I have thrown in a close up of a termite coprolite apparently they have not changed in shape (hexagonal) for 75 million years. These are so abundant in the plant debris bed residue you end up ignoring them after a while. The rest I have not identified yet and are actually mega spores I believe. Also I found a tiny insect wing on the surface of some Bembridge limestone and a section of reed from a different piece. This is why the Isle of Wight is such a special place for me.
  20. Plants in Kansas?

    Hi all, I've been collecting a lot of late Pennsylvanian invertebrates (mostly from the Virgilian Series) in the area surrounding where I live (Manhattan, KS), which is in the NE part of the state. I was wondering if any of you have found plant fossils in Eastern Kansas, as I want to start collecting some of those as well. I read that Clinton Reservoir's outlet does have some shale and limestone layers that have insect and plant fossils, but I am sure that area has been picked through thoroughly. Do any of you all have suggestions? Thanks a ton!!!
  21. Fossil root (?)

    From the album Collection

    Not 100% this is Surprise Cyn Fm.

    © fruitoftheZOOM

  22. Nice leaf fossils

    Not sure when I found these, but my wife today wanted to clean out a shed that I didnt know I had fossils in? Anyways, these have been sittin in the shed since we moved here to Montana. 11 years. So I did a bit of prep on two of them. Came out purty dang nice. One is a kind of Willow and the other I have no idea, but it was nice to find a stem and a tip! These are from Colorado and are Eocene in age. Ive still got to cut off about 50 freakin pounds of rock to square them up, but my tile saw isnt workiing at the moment. RB
  23. Fossil Plants 3 Permian 1

    I started collecting fossils with vertebrates, sometimes my friend and me we found fossil plants. But the plant fossils have less importance than the fish and amphibians, acanthodians and sharks ........ years later I became a gardener, graduated from the master school and asked me only the question ... how did it all start? When did the first plants keep the head out of the water and populate the still inanimate land? I rummaged through the internet, which I found first - Rhynia ..... and similar plants as Psilophyton ... now had suddenly the first finds of the Perm meaning, the puzzle grew, still growing ... every fossil is a Wonders how fragile plants can be, how wonderful, if we can find them as fossils. ..... Then I moved, now in the middle of the Devon and have a famous place of reference before the door ... Plants of Alken on the Moselle! I found some plants like Psilophyton and saw some collectors hunting for Trilobites...the plants had been thrown away,....perhaps they didn´t know about it!!! Pity for them - what a blessing for me !
  24. I started collecting fossils with vertebrates, sometimes my friend and me we found fossil plants. But the plant fossils have less importance than the fish and amphibians, acanthodians and sharks ........ years later I became a gardener, graduated from the master school and asked me only the question ... how did it all start? When did the first plants keep the head out of the water and populate the still inanimate land? I rummaged through the internet, which I found first - Rhynia ..... and similar plants as Psilophyton ... now had suddenly the first finds of the Perm meaning, the puzzle grew, still growing ... every fossil is a Wonders how fragile plants can be, how wonderful, if we can find them as fossils. ..... Then I moved, now in the middle of the Devon and have a famous place of reference before the door ... Plants of Alken on the Moselle! I found some plants like Psilophyton and saw some collectors hunting for Trilobites...the plants had been thrown away,....perhaps they didn´t know about it!!! Pity for them - what a blessing for me !
  25. Where are the best fossil hunting grounds in southern Illinois, preferably with fossils from non-sea creatures?
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