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Found 160 results

  1. Fossil IDs (if possible)

    I like collecting fossils, but I usually am not sure what my finds are. Please, could you help me identify these fossils? I noted down some possibilities down below. 1 - could be a late Albian ammonite from central Serbia, but I am not entirely sure. Acquired in Serbia. 2 - Found at Southerndown, Wales. Could it be a tree root or something in the region of that? It has a cross-hatched pattern if you look closely. 3 & 4 - A shell I found at Penarth, Wales but I am not entirely sure what it is called. 5 - A bone I found in the mud at Tites Point, Severn, Gloucestershire. maybe a birds? 6 - Some shells I found in mudstone at Charmouth, England. Was found in the same stone as 7. 7 - wood I found at Charmouth? It was very crumbly and delicate. 8 - A Trilobite fragment possibly, Llanfawr quarries, Wales. 9 - A bivalve I found in Southerndown. Not sure what it is though.
  2. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00744-3
  3. Miocene Plants in Lacustrine Formation

    I found these in a Miocene lake bed formation northeast of Phoenix, Arizona. The lake beds are deposited along with volcanic rocks and are probably part of the Chalk Canyon Formation. The lake beds have pieces of agatized plant material. Any ideas of what the plants might be? I am especially interested in the molds of a jointed plant shown in the first three photos. @paleoflor Photo about 6cm high. Detail of first photo. Filled center of plant stem ~0.7mm. Depressed mold of stem ~ 3mm across. Height of photo ~2.5cm. Detail of first photo. Center of stem ~ 1mm. Mold of stem ~3mm across. Length of stem ~5.5cm. Bunch of stems average of 5mm across. Cross section of above photo. Typical stems each about 2 - 4mm across. Possible stromatolite/algae structure.
  4. I went last weekend for a new carboniferous hunt with few nice finds
  5. L.S., To liberate storage space, I would like to offer the following plant fossils for trade. All specimens below come from the Late Carboniferous of the Piesberg quarry near Osnabrück (Germany). Scale on photographs in centimetres (1 inch = 2.54 cm). Specimens B, C, F and G show neuropterid fronds of various sizes (most likely Laveineopteris rarinervis). Note specimens B and G were recovered broken and have been glued/repaired. Specimen E is a large plate and shows reproductive structures of Calamites (E-1), a Laveineopteris frond (E-2), a strap-like Cordaites leaf, and some Annularia-like leaf whorls. If interested, I could also offer the counterpart of E. If preferable, I can cut specimen F to size (currently large slab of rock for the actual imprint). In general, please note that these specimens are rather large and heavy (I will cover the shipping costs, but you will need space to display these pieces). In return, I would be mainly interested in plant fossils from the Devonian to Cretaceous (but feel free to offer younger material also). Kind regards, Tim Specimen B: Specimen C: Specimen E: Specimen F: Specimen G:
  6. http://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/news/2019/january/a-tiny-fossil-amoeba-is-helping-us-to-understand-how-plants-firs.html
  7. Does anyone know of some good fossil sites in the Phoenix area, or within a couple of hours drive? Will be spending a couple of months there. Atrypa
  8. I went saturday on my fav carbobiniferous sites to find few fossils,a lot of mud and water,but few good rewards
  9. Mazon Creek fossil plants: Part 1

    Hi guys! Long story short, a rather large collection of Mazon Creek fossils has been donated to my university. I thought I'd share some pictures of the collection and confirm some preliminary identifications. There are a lot of specimens so I will probably split this into two posts. Annularia radiata Annularia stellata A whole bunch of Annularia stellata?
  10. Seed Fossil?

    These 2 are part of a many (50 or more) fossils/imprints I found in a creek bed on a visit this summer to our family farm in Ritchie County, WV. Since we're going back for a visit next week, I thought I'd try to ID these now and look for more while I'm there again. The bulk of the fossils/imprints I've ID'd as ferns, and maybe lycophytes (if my research so far is correct) but can't find anything on the imprints in the attached photos. I'm new to plant fossils, so would appreciate some help in ID'ing this set. Here's what I know: All the fossils/imprints I found, including the attached, were in the same 3-4 meter area along a shallow (1-1.5 meter high) creek bank in Ritchie County, WV; They were found in thick sheets of wet, muddy shale; and The 2 imprints in the photos fit into one another as a match/pair. Here are my questions: What are/were the 2 ovals that fit into one another in the photos? Is there anything else of interest I should be noticing in the attached photos and/or in the other similar fossils/imprints I've found? Note that the last photo are the 2 pieces flipped over. Thanks in advance.
  11. Diplotmema dissectum

    Scale on photograph. The following classification scheme was adopted: Anderson, J.M., Anderson, H.M., and Cleal, C.J. (2007), Brief history of the gymnosperms: classification, biodiversity, phytogeography and ecology, Strelitzia 20, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria (LINK).
  12. Hi everyone! I am new here, and a newbie to fossil collecting in general. I have a question I haven’t quite been able to find answers to by searching on the site. Hope this is the right on the forum place to ask.... I have some fossils I am thinking of displaying in a dry aquarium, and I would like to add live plants in with them. Is this OK for the fossils? Will the moisture from watering plants harm them at all or cause any problems? (They’ve made it millions of years and I don’t want to damage them after all this time!) Thanks for any help!
  13. Medullosa leuckartii

    The following classification scheme was adopted: Anderson, J.M., Anderson, H.M., and Cleal, C.J. (2007), Brief history of the gymnosperms: classification, biodiversity, phytogeography and ecology, Strelitzia 20, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria (LINK).
  14. Hi, all, does anyone know where I can get/order some posters showing the Pennsylvanian forests? I am doing a presentation on plant fossils in Jan. and would like to accent it with art work, thanks, Herb
  15. I had the time today to make a new visit on the coal heap with few nice Neuropteris,pecopteris lepidodendron and Eusphenopteris finds but on the way back i made a stop in a wine shop where a 80 famous french actor sign is bottles a good way to finish the day
  16. Seeds?

    I have a couple of rocks that look like seeds. What do you think? Do those look like bite marks on the one on the left? Let's hear your thoughts. The one on the right was in pea gravel at a playground in Iowa, I find fossil shell fossils in pea gravel sometimes. I'm not sure where I got the other one, in central Iowa.
  17. Please help id and inform me

    Hello i went to the river today in central alberta and found these fossils i believe one is petrified wood but it also has a translucent mineral in it?? I think?? And orange mineral around it which i assume is sap amber??? the size of these rocks are around a baseball please help identify all of them and offer info ill greatly appreciate it first two pictures are of opposite sides same as the other two.
  18. Jacksboro Texas Plants

    I showed Jeffery P the Jacksboro spillway on his swing through Texas and it was my day to find plants in this otherwise marine site. At least I think that both are plants. First this piece with mm scale which I'm guessing could be Cordaites or Artisia pith. Edge view and close-up and other side Next this leaf which I think is one of the seed fern pinnules, also with mm scale other side end views and side views Does anyone agree and can you tell which of the seed ferns this could be?
  19. Clermont l'Hérault

    Hi everybody, today is a sunny day here and all the past week was sunny. I was in holidays on the boarders of the lake Salagou, which means in occitan (spoken in the south of France) salted taste. This lake is artificial and represent a good reserve of water for the cultures and for the fight against fires. It's soil is from the Permian and composed of red ruffes : clays very rich in oxides of iron.
  20. Hello, I have been a long time member of the fossil forum, but I have never posted before. I live in south Florida and I am planning on making a trip up to northwestern Georgia, northeastern Alabama, and southeastern Tennessee for two or three days and I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on fossil hunting sites in the region. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
  21. My dad and I recently took a trip to collect plant fossils at two locales near Centralia, PA. Given that St. Clair is no longer accessible to collecting, we found that this area offered the next best option for collecting similar fossil ferns. We came away with a lot of large samples of Calamites sp., including several pith casts that just fell out of the rock. We also found a fair amount of Annularia, Neuropteris, and Pecopteris. Here are only a few of our best finds. I hope you enjoy. If you disagree on an identification, please let me know; I am still trying to identify everything. Some Neuropteris from Centralia What looks to be the bark of Sigillaria
  22. Tiny Mazon plants

    I collected some small nodules last week and when I tried to open this one the top split to reveal this. I decided to hit the larger part one more time to see if I could uncover the rest. Instead the larger piece split in half and this is what was inside the same nodule. Are these annularia? They are very different from the other fossil I found in the right picture which I am pretty sure is annularia.
  23. Dorchester Cape (July 2018)

    I hadn't blogged in a while, but here's my latest excursion (I have more but I'll have to dig up the information, and some are still pending field work/research) On July 5th I went for a drive down Beaumont, in the Memramcook region in South-Eastern New Brunswick (Canada), to check how bad the road along the coast had eroded with time since the last time I went down there rock picking. I stopped in a few places to check on the rocks down the beach wherever I could go down, and spotted the cliffs of Dorchester Cape across the Memramcook river. Hopped in the car and proceeded to make the short few kilometers trek to the other side. Location indicator shows Dorchester Cape on the map (Google Maps) Location of the cliffs The geology of the area is mostly formed of Upper Carboniferous rocks, and the location I was at is mostly Boss Point formation. The Boss Point formation is also found in Cape Enrage, Rockport, and Upper Joggins, to name a few places. The fossils that I find at the Dorchester Cape site is mostly discombobulate plant material, with dark grey to tan sandstones with some sandy conglomerate boulders lying about. Chunks of gypsum and some Albertite can be seen on the beach, as evaporites abound in the Albert Mines area, and some other unspecified locations in the Memramcook area. Albertite, and then gypsum, were an important part of the local economy, especially in Hillsborough across the river, as the geology of the surrounding area sees large deposits of various evaporites, a relic of the ancient Windsor Sea which would have receeded, giving way to vast forests and rivers. But what was most important for Dorchester Cape was the copper found in the sedimentary rocks. This copper ore, chalcocite, was discovered in the late 1860s and mined until all operations came to a stop before the First Great War. Dorchester Copper Mine. K. Vanderwolf. New Brunswick Museum. From Memramcook, I drove down the 106 towards Dorchester. Once in the village, you take the 935, which is Cape Road, heading towards Dorchester Cape. The road turns into a dirt road about 2 clicks after the train tracks. Turn into the dirt road across the Atlantic Industries Limited business site. Make your way down the road, avoiding pot holes and man made roadblocks, and you'll eventually reach the old wharf. Make your way South (left of the wharf) and head towards the cliffs near Cole Point. Looking back, view of Fort Folly Point slicing Shepody Bay. As we get closer to the rock cliffs, you can already spot coal and petrified wood on the beach. The plant fossils are mostly fragmented, showing signs of turbulence. There's some micro faulting in some places, and large sections of the cliffs are coming down in large segments. Plastered with plants/tree parts (hat for scale) The beach is littered with petrified wood, plant fossils, and chunks of coal. Middle section replaced with orange calcite crystals Some pieces are quite large (dirty hat for scale) Common theme: plants sticking out to catch some Sun One of the few holes where trees used to lie in situ The cliffs have coal seams that can reach a few inches thick. Tree imprint Nice tree sticking out (squished hat for scale) Close to the tree NOT sand (chances of lithification?)
  24. Hi all, My friends recently visited Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia. While they were there they went on a fossil hunt with a geologist who curates the local museum. They were told that they could collect the small, loose stuff, and so brought back plenty of nice fossils. They gave a couple specimens to me, and I’m just wondering about IDing them. There are a lot of Calamites fossils among what they brought back, but I’m having trouble with the rest. I live in the Ordovician and don’t have a lot of experience with Carboniferous flora except finding a few pretties in Pittsburgh. First pic (1) has what they were told is an early seed cone. Can anyone corroborate and specify species? I was looking at Lepidostrobus but the shape seems different. Second pic (2) is one of the fossils they gave me. They thought that the top left might be part of a seed cone but I think it’s Annularia. Thoughts? And are those oval-shaped leaves Pecopteris ? Alethopteris ? And just for fun, I’ll add a couple more pictures (see comments) if anyone wants to have at it. Anyways, thanks!
  25. Plant ID needed from Kentucky

    Hello everyone, I have a small collection that I picked up on a trip to Kentucky...the area around hazard. I think its the Breathitt formation. Pennsylvanian period. I have been in the process of Identifying them. I think I have a decent lock on some of them, but could use a little help on a few. I should add some more photos of 3 and 4. Let me know if you need anything specific (close up on a certain area, or what have you).
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