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Found 186 results

  1. Oligocarpia?

    Hi all, The specimen below comes from the Asturian (Westphalian D) of the Piesberg quarry near Osnabrück, Germany. It has been in my collection for some years already, but I never managed to ID it further than "something with Sphenopteris-like pinnules". Recently, I bought some new literature and now I think I have some sort of ID, but am definitely stuck on the species level (and hence also not quite sure yet about the generic level.) The specimen from the Piesberg shows a strong resemblance to Oligocarpia gutbierii Göppert 1841 as figured by Kidston (1923), Plate LXX figs. 1-3. Both the presence and the specific appearance of the aphlebia on my specimen (encircled in light blue) also correspond well with Kidston's description text, as well as the aforementioned figures. By contrast, the Oligocarpia gutbierii specimens figured by Kidston (1923) on Plate LXXV, figs 1-2 do not look like my specimen at all (this may be related to them coming from another position in the larger frond - not clear to me.) The specimens figured by Kidston (1923) under Oligocarpia brongniartii Stur 1883 (Plate LXIX, figs 2-3) show less resemblance to the Piesberg specimen. However, in literature dealing with the Piesberg locality, only this species is mentioned to occur (e.g. Josten, 1991). Comparing my specimen to Oligocarpia gutbierii and Oligocarpia brongniartii as figured by Brousmiche (1983), i.e. Plates 57-61 and Plates 62-64, respectively, neither seems to be a very good match. Unfortunately, my French is not good enough to recognise the subtle differences that may be described in the accompanying text volume. Moreover, my specimen is a sterile frond, rendering the most clearly defined differences between Oligocarpia gutbierii and Oligocarpia brongiartii unusable. The venation is difficult to photograph and see, due to gümbelite mineralisation (orange colour), but visible when the specimen is held at an angle to a light source. Under these constraints, what would be the best way to discriminate between these two (and perhaps other) species? Or am I dealing with something else completely? Thanks, Tim
  2. Found this fossil and sent it to a paleoethnobotanist who was able to pull a pollen spore and identify the species.
  3. Found this in Ohio. I have found several of these, but this is the largest one so far.
  4. Almost there! Over 270 pages of full color fossils from the Pennsylvanian of North Texas The long-awaited sequel to the Pennsylvanian Fossils of North Texas (2003) Available Q4 2015 in hardcopy, digital and e-reader formats.
  5. I couldn't stand it and went out to my new site in the Fort Union/ Hell Creek formation in central Montana for a couple hours despite the mud and found lots of plant material with straight grain and almost a reed look. This guy was in the middle of the sample. It is segmented and curved. Is it a worm or maybe a reed? Also there were what looked like seeds. I found different things but don't want to overdo.
  6. Sussex Field Work (2015)

    Sussex is an interesting region in terms of geology and paleobiology. An amalgamation of different formations crisscrossing the larger Moncton Basin, this area was the target of study by local and foreign interests. Sussex is known for its potash mines, but one shouldn't forget the importance of the rich fossil localities doting the region. One such discovery was probably evidence of Canada's oldest forest, which is of significance. Matt Stimson, along with other professionals in the field, did some work in the area. I've had the chance to assist on occasion in a few field trips. The work done in this region is still ongoing and soon to be published. This time around we decided to target an area I've never gone or attempted to go yet. I'm used to quarries, but this time we would be spending the day at a road cut. Me and my braids Matt getting ready It was a few days after the Christmas holidays so it was kinda cold. The wind was nippy but we were lucky that ice hadn't formed yet on the ledges and that snow hadn't blanketed the area. The day started kinda grey but by the afternoon, the Sun had come out. It was a welcome event as the wind was freakin' cold. We made our way to the center cut. Traffic wasn't much of a factor as you can see cars coming from miles away, and plenty of space to park my car off the road. Area of Research: The rocks here are comprised of several units of interbedding sandstones and mudstones. Within these units, some several meters thick, are shale layers. Within these layers are indications of both plant and aquatic biota. Traces of fish material, scales, teeth, bone, are contained in some of the layers, forming some small limestone lenses and strata. Other areas along the cut feature plants. In all this mix, there are trackways. The work in the area is ongoing so all the data hasn't surfaced yet until publication sees the day. The cut showed signs of faulting, backed by folding. This looked promising We found many invertebrate trackways such as diplichnites and rusophycus. Most were very well preserved, even though exposed to the elements. From traces to scales and teeth, the record showed a high level of activity, condensed. The work goes on. We reached a spot where we encountered plants. I don't remember if these were referenced or cataloged previously. The preservation was fair, and we were able to find a good number of specimens. The New Brunswick Museum lab will have new specimens to work on by the end of the day. One of many specimens Root system Plant specimen showing shoot/stem and leaves We've covered only a small portion of the area. Different zones have been targeted for future study. Having done work for the past Summers, I can see why Sussex and its surrounding localities have been visited. The amount of fossils in the around is astounding, especially when talking about trackways. The work continues... - Keenan
  7. Clifton (June 2014)

    As I promised myself, this has now become a yearly trip for me. As I'm getting ready to head out soon, let's reminisce on a previous trip that happened on one, if not THE hottest day of June of 2014. ..as one comes down from the wave breakers near the wharf of Stonehaven I checked the weather for that day and I knew it was going to be a hot one, but I never anticipated what hot was in this area. I've prepared but soon to find out I could have been more careful. But I digress. Moving on. If you've been keeping tabs on my previous Clifton posts, you'll remember that these layers are mostly perpendicular to each other, almost perfectly horizontal observed in short distances. The Sandstone tends to meet with meandering bodies of water. When you walk, you'll mostly see the rock layers as shown from the pic above, and then bam, you'll get to see this: The lenses show bodies infilled with different clast size, forming sandstone and/or mudstone type filled channels. Here's what I see when I look at the photo above: Close up Water channels that move, in perpetual motion, migrating this way or that. Interesting features as one tends to keep a closer eye for any sign of trackways. The strata in Clifton also contain in situ wonderful tree specimens that rival the ones at Joggins, at least in size. I can't recall if I've encountered one tree in Clifton that had been scared by flames such as in its almost twin in Joggins, but I'll have to make note next trek. When you're lucky enough, you will get shale that can be split without destroying the whole sample. The fragility of some makes it tough to be able to conserve in one piece but it happens from time to time. The details on some of these plants are exquisite. There are a few other places in New Brunswick, such as Minto, where plants have been perserved in similar high contrast. I haven't had the time to delve into naming different members of specific genus or families, but that will come soon enough. This is an interesting fella Calamite, annularia... As the Sun started beating down on me and my water reserve severely depleting, I turned tail and made my way off the beach. These cliffs created a dead zone as no current was passing through and I could feel the full brunt of an almost 40 degree Celcius heat. By the time I had made my way up and recovered, I've realized how close I came to having a heat stroke. Hospitalization would have probably happened. On my way back to Moncton, which was about 3 hours drive back South of the province, the heat had taken its effects on me and luckily my parents lived on the road on the main stretch. I stopped and rested for a while to try to recuperate and gather some semblance of strength and finished my trip. I think it is in the cards to bring at least a partner next time I go. There is a whole lot to do in Clifton and there are many opportunities to explore in this locale. The main thing beside shining a spotlight in this geographical treasure trove, is to have locals made aware of how important this site is for not just New Brunswick, but for the entire scientific community. There is some work being done on some discoveries made in the recent years, but there is vast potential to make more. As long as there is interest, people will keep being drawn to this forgotten shore where once vast forests doted the land, offering life and shelter to its many denizens. The search continues. - Keenan
  8. Some Small Misc. Finds This Week.

    Went to a new spot along a creek behind an old quarry in Racine County WI. Looked like the area had been pretty well picked over. Lots of broken rock fragments, dug up pieces, etc. Had a great day though and it beat having to go to work that day lol. Not sure of the names of some of the pieces. One thing i have found in large abundance here in Racine and Kenosha Counties is the black lava Igneous rock. Some of them are Obsidian and some are Diorite. In this location there was buckets full of it everywhere. No Trilobites at all though which was my main goal. You never no what you will come across that's for sure.
  9. Hi all, A day on which you find a complete or nearly complete frond is a fantastic day, if you ask me. They are quite rare plant fossils, as most compound leaves disintegrate prior to fossilization or collection. Besides being rare, complete fronds are fantastic and important, as they provide insight in the gross morphology of the plants that bore them. Not to mention they are often beautiful to look at. Clearly superb fossils, I reckon they deserve some attention. Please show your finds! I'll kick off with a ?Karinopteris robusta specimen from the Westphalian D of the Piesberg quarry, Germany. Width of image is about 25 cm (from memory). P.S. Large branching systems are more than welcome too!
  10. Not Sure What Plant This Is.

    any idea what this one is?
  11. Roadcuts

    Anyone ever collect along road cuts in Connenticut? It seems like most of the sedimentary rocks of the right age run through interstate highways. If you have collected where was it and what did you find? (pictures would be great, site or fossil)
  12. Jurassic conifer

    From the album Jurassic fossils from the Newark Supergroup

    Brachyphyllum scotti (conifer) Lower Jurassic Shuttle Meadow Formation Newark Supergroup Southington, CT. Donated to the author by Tim Jones. Thanks, Tim.
  13. From the album Carboniferous from PA.

    Alethopteris serlii (seed fern frond imprint) Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation Carbondale, PA.
  14. Neuropteris leaf from St. Clair, PA.

    From the album Carboniferous from PA.

    Neuropteris decipiens (leaf) Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation St. Clair, PA.
  15. Seed fern from St. Clair,PA.

    From the album Carboniferous from PA.

    Alethopteris serlii (frond) Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation St. Clair, PA.
  16. From the album Carboniferous from PA.

    Lepidophyte branch or root section Pennsylvanian' Llewellyn Formation Carbondale, PA.
  17. Ferns from St. Clair

    From the album Carboniferous from PA.

    Pectopteris sp., Alethopteris serlii, Sphenophyllum emerginatum Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation St. Clair, PA.
  18. Pyrite fern from St. Clair, PA.

    From the album Carboniferous from PA.

    Mariopteris cf. lobata (partially preserved in pyrite) Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation St. Clair, PA.
  19. Fern fossils from St. Clair

    From the album Carboniferous from PA.

    Neuropteris ovata, Alethopteris serlli. Sphenophyllum sp. Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation St. Clair, PA.
  20. Imprint of Wattieza stump

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Wattieza sp. (imprint of stump) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Gilboa, NY Collected from the shore of Gilboa Reservoir in the 1970's, long before regulations restricted access and collecting.
  21. Dear all, Since it is simply impossible for an individual collector to collect everywhere, trading offers a great method to diversify. Several TFF Members are actively collecting plant fossils and together we cover an almost worldwide range of different localities. Even if you are specializing in a particular area, fossils of equivalent age from elsewhere could prove interesting material for comparison purposes (for example, there are some interesting parallels and differences between the European and North American Pennsylvanian floras). My question is, therefore: is anyone interested in trading plant fossil material? Anyone who had any plant material to offer for trade, or is looking for particular specimens to trade, please chime in! Cheers, Tim
  22. Hi Everyone, I recently spent some time in New York, and being the fossil fanatic I am, couldn't resist visiting the Gilboa area to see what I could find. Gilboa is famous for its 380-385 million year old fossil forest. During the short hike, I collected various specimens, none of which I could identify (not being an expert or anything even close). Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance, Regards P.S many photo so may have to post them in comments.
  23. Silurian Plant Fossil From Poland

    Hi Everyone, I recently bought this fossil on ebay. The seller called it hostinella, but hostinella seems to be a form fossil. It comes from the Kielce region of southern poland, and is about 10mm long. Could this be a cooksonia fossil? What is a form fossil? How old is this fossil? How much should I have paid for this? Thanks to anyone who answers!
  24. Dear Forum, All six of the following photographs show Sigillaria fossils. But what species? I know there are a couple of lycophyte specialists here on the forum, and any help with identification is much appreciated. All specimens were found in the Westphalian (Upper Carboniferous) of Belgium or the Netherlands. Scale bar = 1 cm (all images). So far we have: 1 S. mamillaris 2 S. 3 S. 4 S. 5 S. boblayi 6 S. tesselata Kind regards, Tim 1 2 3 4 5 6
  25. Hi all, During Permian times, the Glossopterids constituted the major/characteristic component of many Gondwanan floras. This certainly also holds for the floras of the Illawarra Coal Measures, from which I have a couple of plates. However, it doesn't mean no other plant types occurred in these Permian forests, of course, they are just less common. While examining one of my plates, I noticed something "different" and after a bit of cleaning, this is what I found. My very first specimen from a so-called Glossopteris-flora which is definitely not a Glossopterid species. Probably, this is a partial frond of Neomariopteris, though I still have to double-check this preliminary ID (waiting for the library to provide me with the books I need - these are momentarily still in storage). Alternatively, it could be a Sphenopterid of some sort. Just wanted to show this new "find", Cheers, Tim
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