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  1. hemipristis

    Indonesian mammal tooth ID requested

    hi all, I purchased a handful of Pliocene shark teeth from Indonesia recently, and the seller included the attached tooth. I'm assuming that it is mammal incisor?. The fauna includes both marine and terrestrial mammal teeth. The enamel preservation is consistent with stegodont and hippo teeth that I have purchased from him. The scale is in cm. Any ideas?
  2. Phillipku2001

    Possible Horse/cow fossils?

    Hey guys new to the forums and thought I’d make a post to have you guys help identify some possible fossils that i found in a local creek after heavy rains.There are lots of mission era ranches so there is a possibility of them being old but not fossilized cow bones. Let me know what you guys think
  3. Brandy Cole

    3 Toed Horse Tooth--Nannipus?

    Weather was cold and windy yesterday, but sunny and calmer down on the Brazos River in southeast Texas. Sandy gravel matrix. I always hate to get my hopes up too early in the game, but I think I may have found my first 3 toed horse tooth. I looked at Hulbert's Fossil Vertebrates of Florida book. Photograph D on pg. 292 is a right m1 or m2 from nannippus aztecus. It appears pretty similar, but I'm not sure about size. Nannippus Aztecus would have been in Texas from late Miocene to Pliocene, so region would fit. And I think @garyc has found a nannippus on the Brazos befo
  4. Shellseeker

    Jaw w/o teeth

    With a little time, I am sorting November fossils. I found this jaw segment back in November. Seems like 3 of 4 teeth are snapped off at the root line. When I found it, I thought it might be alligator (short , round alveoli) but now I lean to dolphin. I am interested in whether any members who have seen broken dolphin teeth and jaw fossils in the Mid_atlantic coast recognize similarities. Thanks for looking. A while back, found another small jaw at this site, turned out to be dolphin. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/115727-new-for-me/ Also just shari
  5. Jonathan Raymond

    My crocodilian tooth collection

    Here is my crocodilian tooth collection picture 1 Species: Alligator mississipiensis Age: 11 700 years- 2,58 million years ( Pleistocen ) Size: 3,96 centimeters Localisation: South Florida picture 2 Species: Thecachampsa americana Age: 2,6- 5,3 million years ( Pliocene ) Size: 2,69 centimeters Localisation: Polk County, Florida picture 3 and 4 Species : Maroccosuchus zennaroi Age : 48- 54 million years ( Early Eocene ) Size: 5,4 centimeters Localisation: Khourigba , Morocco Formation: Ouled Ab
  6. ClearLake

    Small Lee Creek Shark Tooth

    I received some matrix from @sixgill pete a while back in a TFF auction and picked most of it a while back and ID'd the bulk of the teeth and other material. Lately I have been going back through some of my sharks teeth and looking more closely at items I was unsure of These three teeth are one such group out of this matrix. I have read Purdy et, al (2001) a bunch of times, looked at elasmo.com for hours on end, read dozens of threads on here and am still a bit confused/uncertain. So, I figured why no just ask and get several more opinions, I always appreciate what folks here have to offer
  7. I found this in the Aurora Fossil Museum dig pits, so it’s likely Pungo River formation (Miocene), although there’s a chance it could be Yorktown formation (Pliocene). Any idea what it is? My best guess is some sort of jaw bone, maybe from a fish.
  8. This was found in the Pliocene marine Pico Formation of Southern California. I'm leaning towards a marine mammal but I'm not even sure if this is bone or part of an echinoid test.
  9. While not as big as my 2.03 inch one I found in 2019 it did come from the same site. So maybe there is another 2 incher there. This one measures 1.65 inches long along the slant and 1.43 inches wide.
  10. Nipponites

    Rotuloidea/Heliophora

    Hello, I bought these fossils as Rotuloidea fimbriata, from the Pliocene of Morocco; yesterday I saw some photos of Heliophora orbicularis, and now I have doubts about what species they are. Any ideas? 1.- 2.- Thanks!
  11. Shellseeker

    Great White position

    I am really sore today but it is always a great day when I find a GW because of their rarity in my hunting area. This is a small one at 33 mm. This was jet black on 1st sight, and seems to lighten as time passes. The "shape" of this tooth seems different to me. Does that allow some further insights on tooth position? There used to be some people trying to do tooth position based on shape for Megs, Makos, GWs.... The one on the right below seems to match:
  12. Dear all, Your admins have given me permission to post about my book: Neogene Sharks of Antwerp here, and for that, a big thanks! I'm sure many of you invested in the shark tooth community have seen my book go by somewhere by now, but just in case you did not, here is the full story; First a little introduction; For who might not know, my name is Stephane Knoll, I am a paleontology enthusiast from Antwerp, Belgium. My focus lays on sharks and especially the Neogene. Luckily my town, Antwerp, is one of the best spots on earth to look for fossil sharks. The fauna we fi
  13. fossilnut

    Blister Pearls

    I have never found pearls before so I am posting for confirmation. I have seen modern blister pearls at rock shows. Also wondering if these are fossil or modern day. The background for these finds is my wife had oysters locally and one had what we believe is a blister pearl. She seems to have an affinity for pearls as she has found 4 pearls (not blister)--2 in mussels and 2 in oysters. A few days later while walking the beach I found the large 1 1/2 inch pearl in a piece of quahog (Mercenaria) shell. Then I found other quahogs with interior coatings that differed from the normal shell. These h
  14. flyingpenut

    Post Oak Creek Oddities

    I usually don't post the trip to POC anymore but this time there were some oddities i wanted to confirm and or see if anyone knows what they are. I found the usual few ptychodus teeth as well as tons of broken shark teeth but also some more rare items. There is one small shark vertebrae, a piece of a fish vert, two broken ends of sawfish rostral teeth, a weird piece that looks like coral to me but also looks like it has teeth poking out of it, a large piece of mammoth enamel, and what I believe is a small mosasaur tooth. Pictures 2, 3, and 4 are the mosasaur tooth. I have it in my hand for sca
  15. Al Dente

    Pliocene trip

    Decided to head to a stream with my kayak on my day off recently. I frequently go to this site because it is not too far of a drive. This site gets collected a lot but it looked like no one had been there in a while. Without people walking over the site, small fossils start to be exposed. I crawled around for a couple hours and found many small fish bones and otoliths. Here are some photos. Lots of inarticulate brachiopods. Only two species found here. The round Discinisca and the lingulid Glottidia which is always broken. There is a Lepophidium (Cu
  16. Sciara willershausensis together with the much smaller and much more common Sciara strausi. Taxonomy according to Kohring & Schlüter 1993. Morphology according to Kohring and Schlüter, 1993, p. 193 (translated from German by oilshale): “The body length is about 7.2 mm. The wing length is between 4.8 and 5.2 mm. The head is very small. The antennae are only incompletely preserved, in total the antennae are on average 1.5 mm long. Individual antennae are indistinctly recognizable in outline. The thorax is 2,1 mm long and oval shaped. The abdomen is 4.5 mm long and evenly point
  17. MikeR

    Pliculofusus scalarina

    From the album: Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Fasciolariidae Pliculofusus scalarina (Heilprin, 1886) Stratigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Bonita Grande, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Primarily found in the Caloosahatchee Formation, but also within the Tamiami upper carbonate units.
  18. MikeR

    Pliculofusus acuta

    From the album: Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Fasciolariidae Pliculofusus acuta (Emmons, 1858) Stratigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Most Plicofusus in the Pinecrest have been referred to as P. scalarina, however they appear closer to the Pliocene forms from the Carolinas. P. acuta has fewer, but more prominent ribs than P. scalarina as well as more angulated whorls.
  19. MikeR

    Liochlamys bulbosa

    From the album: Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Fasciolariidae Liochlamys bulbosa (Heilprin, 1886) Stratigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Bonita Grande, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: A classic Caloosahatchian species with only a few records within the FLMNH database for the Tamaimi.
  20. MikeR

    Aurantilaria lindae

    From the album: Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Fasciolariidae Aurantilaria lindae (Petuch, 2004) Stratigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Bonita Grande, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: A highly nodose and rare shell.
  21. MikeR

    Triplofusus gignatea

    From the album: Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Fasciolariidae Triplofusus gignatea (Kiener, 1840) Stratigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: Common name is the Horse Conch and it is the largest gastropod found within the United States.
  22. MikeR

    Hemipolygona stephensae

    From the album: Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Fasciolariidae Hemipolygona stephensae (Lyons, 1991) Stratigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Lake excavation, Collier County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: More inflated than Polygona, this species preferred carbonate environments.
  23. MikeR

    Cinctura rhomboidea

    From the album: Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Fasciolariidae Cinctura rhomboidea (Rogers & Rogers, 1839) Stratigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: MR 9474-1017 from SMR Phase 10 and MR 1356-92 from APAC, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Some authors have called the short spire form C. apicina, but in the Pinecrest Beds, both forms occur and can be identified by the unadorned apical whorls.
  24. MikeR

    Cinctura apicina

    From the album: Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Fasciolariidae Cinctura apicina (Heilprin, 1886) Stratigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Bonita Grande, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Similar to the recent Cinctura hunteria, but with the first two apical whorls highly sculpted. Within the Tamiami, this species is usually found within the carbonate unit.
  25. MikeR

    Fasciolaria okeechobensis

    From the album: Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Fasciolariidae Fasciolaria okeechobensis Tucker & Wilson, 1932 Stratigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Construction site, Collier County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Similar to the recent Fasciolaria tulipa, but with the first two apical whorls highly sculpted. Some authors have listed this species as an index fossil of the Middle Pleistocene Bermont Formation, but I have found it at several Tamiami Golden Gate sites as well as the Caloosahatchee.
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