Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'pliocene'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 623 results

  1. Marine Mammal Vertebrae?

    Bone fragment found on the York River in Virginia. It is the Yorktown Formation, Pliocene epoch. I'm wondering if it is a vertebrae fragment, and what species it might belong to. It's convex on one side, and concave on the other.
  2. Mysterious coral fossil

    This is a coral fossil found in Myloi Gorge, in Rethymno area. I can't identify it, but i know its epoch is Pliocene because in that area were found fish fossils in matrix dated from the Zanclean subepoch( subepoch in Pliocene). Please, can you try to identify it. Thanks.
  3. Hard time identifying

    Found in landfill behind my building. Can’t seem to find pictures or info. Any help (as always) well appreciated
  4. Chesapecten jeffersonius

    As a graduate of the University of Virginia, I thought it would be cool to add to my collection a fossil named after the founder of the university, Thomas Jefferson. I was disappointed to read that one of the best places to find Chesapecten jeffersonius shells - Chippokes Plantation State Park - no longer allows you to collect the shells there. I had also read that Chesapecten sp. shells can be found at York River State Park, but that Chesapecten jeffersonius unfortunately cannot be found there. Is that true? Are there other sites in Virginia where you can find Chesapecten jeffersonius? With the personal connection to UVA and Thomas Jefferson, I would greatly appreciate any help. Thank you so much!
  5. Fossil fossils

    Hi everybody. I found this Fossil fossils and I don't know anything about can you please let me know what this Fossil fossils . Thank you .
  6. Concavus concavus (Bronn 1831)

    From the album Other Fauna

    Synonym Balanus concavus Cirripedia (Barnacle) 4x6cm. Zanglean, Early Pliocene From Pikermi, Eastern Attika, Greece From my Secret Santa Dimitris
  7. Found this odd 9" long jaw-like fossilized bone in a small creek within the Yorktown formation in Virginia between the York River and I-64. It is atypical of the Baleen Whale and Ice Age mammal bones I have found in the same area. Any help with identifying this specimen would be appreciated.
  8. Rock ...or Bulla

    Chances to get out hunting have disappeared. A lot of rain with Hurricane Theta and then some tropical storms. There is a lot of activity late in the season which means higher faster water in rivers and creeks. So I look back on recent curiosities. Hunting 10 days ago, I pick up a curious rock that seemed to have texture, broken at one end. It was white inside. At a distance of 10 feet and 2 hours digging, I found the smaller end. That might be a shovel mark, and for a second I thought I might have broken it, but 10 feet apart, no way. I really do not like breaking fossils. . Now it looks like a water worn whale bulla with a rock boring mollusk hole at one end. But what about that white inside? What is it? How did it form? A couple of more photos... So, we might say that the white was sand (silica) that filled the bulla, and underwent a "transformation". Note that in the last photo , the white seems to merge with the fossilized bone... Curiouser and curiouser... I certainly look for insight from those who have seen this previously.
  9. heres a link to a newly described fossil seal that we have been finding bones and skulls of here in taranaki, new zealand for the last 15 or so years. https://www.google.com/search?client=opera&hs=0U9&biw=1496&bih=754&tbm=nws&sxsrf=ALeKk01vc72KwYUUtagYwhLgRk96jWpnXQ%3A1605241533476&ei=vQquX5veHM7w9QPNhoLgBQ&q=new+zealand+fossil+seal&oq=new+zealand+fossil+seal&gs_l=psy-ab.3...33364.36178.0.37013.5.5.0.0.0.0.554.1364.0j1j3j5-1.5.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.0.0....0.uRROVU4bIrg
  10. Fossil Tooth

    Hi. I was at Ramsholt Cliffs in Suffolk, Uk today and found this strange looking tooth. It’s a very large incisor and looks too big to be from a modern human. Could it be an ape of some sort? The rock formations are London Clay, red crag and coralline crag, on the river shoreline a few miles inland from the Suffolk coast. It is a well known treasure trove for fossils. I also found various sharks teeth, also exciting but this tooth is very interesting! Any help or ideas as to what it is from would be great.
  11. Is this a real mammoth tooth?

    Hi all, Someone offered me to sell his what he called to be a baby mammoth tooth. I have been looking around but I am a bit suspicious about the root. I would appreciate if you would kindly put some expertise on it before I buy it. Unfortunately the origin is not known, but it is probably found by fisherman in the North Sea. Thanks for helping me out! Ronny
  12. Sinistrofulgur contrarium

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Sinistrofulgur contrarium (Conrad, 1840) Stratigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 8 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Differences in the spire and sculpture of the fossil species separates it from recent Sinistrofulgur sinistrum.
  13. Busycoarctum tropicalis

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Busycoarctum tropicalis (Petuch, 1994) Stratigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Sub adults of this species have been identified as Busycoarctum rapum while adults resemble Busycoarctum maximum. Heilprin (1886) in his description of B. rapum stated that it is a smooth shell lacking shoulder spines. B. tropicalis is more heavily striated with shoulder spines suggesting a different species.
  14. Busycotypus bicoronatum

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Busycotypus bicoronatum (Tripp, 1988) Stratigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Quality Aggregates Quarry, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Although similar in appearance to B spiratum, B bicoronatum is closer to the recent Channeled Whelk, Busycotypus canaliculatus but less inflated.
  15. Busycotypus spiratus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Busycotypus spiratus (Lamarck, 1816) Stratigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: The pear whelk is a common component of the molluscan fauna on both Florida coasts.
  16. Laeviscyon planulatum

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Laeviscyon planulatum (Dall, 1890) Stratigraphy: Bed 4 Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Almost identical to L. laevis but lacking a subsutural sulcus. Since both L. planulatum and L laevis are found in the same unit, the sulculus could be variation thus making L. laevis a synonym to L. planulatum.
  17. Laeviscyon laevis

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Laeviscyon laevis (Petuch, 1982) Stratigraphy: Bed 4 Tamiami Formation Location: APAC Quarry, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Less inflated than L. demistriatum with a deep narrow subsutural sulcus. Mostly smooth with faint spirals
  18. Laeviscyon demistriatum

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Laeviscyon demistriatum (Petuch, 1982) Stratigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Inflated final whorl with subsutural sulcus. Mostly smooth with faint spirals
  19. Pyruella schmidti

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Pyruella schmidti Petuch, 1994 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Large distinctive widely spaced spirals. Noticeable subsutural sulcus.
  20. Pyruella fredericoae

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Pyruella fredericoae Petuch, 1994 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Similar to P. sarasotaensis but with a sloping final whorl.
  21. Pyruella sarasotaensis

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Pyruella sarasotaensis Petuch, 1982 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Quality Aggregates Quarry, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Shape edged final whorl with a deep subsuture sulculs.
  22. Pyruella rugosicostata

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Pyruella rugosicostata Petuch, 1982 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC Quarry, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: A rare species from the lower beds of the Pinecrest. Low spire with a sharp edged lower whorl.
  23. Ptychosalpinx multirugata

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Buccinidae Ptychosalpinx multirugata (Conrad, 1832) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Kissimmee River, Highlands County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Common in the Yorktown Formation of Virginia and North Carolina, but rarer in Florida. Mostly found in the Tamiami deposits in the Kissimmee River exposures.
  24. Shark tooth? North Carolina

    I found this tooth (same tooth, two sides) in some phosphate mine slag from the Aurora Fossil Museum. Can you tell what species this is? I don't see anything quite like it on the charts I've consulted. The other pic is from the same slag and is some kind of ray, I believe.
×