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Found 623 results

  1. Echinofulgur helenae

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Echinofulguridae Echinofulgur helenae (Olsson, 1967) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC Pit Bed 4, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: More variable that E. echinatum, E. helenae is the common Echinofulgur in the lower beds of the Pinecrest. Ranges from tall straight individuals similar to E. echinatum to short stubby forms reminiscent of Tropochasca petiti. A row of spines on the siphonal canal distinguishes it from E. echinatum.
  2. Echinofulgur echinatum

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Echinofulguridae Echinofulgur echinatum (Dall, 1890) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC Pit Bed 4, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: This species is much more common in the Florida Pleistocene than the Pliocene. It lacks the row of spines on the siphonal canal which is indicative of E. helenae.
  3. Tropochasca petiti

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Melongenidae Tropochasca petiti Olsson, 1967 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Resembles a Echinofulgur but with a more compact body, shorter spire and twisted siphonal canal suggesting Melongenidae. An extinct genera with no modern analog to compare with.
  4. Melongena consors

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Melongenidae Melongena consors (G.B. Sowerby II, 1850) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Large and highly variable which has led to taxonomic splitting. Inflated body whorl with variable rows of spines. Ranges from the Lower Miocene/Pliocene Caribbean and the Upper Pliocene Florida deposits.
  5. Melongena consors

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Melongenidae Melongena consors (G.B. Sowerby II, 1850) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 8 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Shown is a smaller individual with three rows of shoulder spines to compare with the large adult specimen MR 9473-1017.
  6. Melongena subcorona

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Melongenidae Melongena subcorona Heilprin, 1886 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Similar to the recent Melongena corona. M. corona has shoulder spines that point upward, while M. subcoronata point outward.
  7. ID request Kythera island

    Hello everyone. I was collecting in an abandoned sand quarry in the Greek island of Kythera. The formation is Tortonian - Zanglean made of various hardness/density sandstone. The upper layer looks like river deposits as it has more round pebbles and its thickness is less than a metre. The main formation exceeds 8m. North of this place (800m) and south of it (1000-1200m) there are confirmed Miocene deposits, terrestrial and river origin. I am clueless with this. 2€ coin = 1inch I thought of mammal tooth but I have no idea of such things. My other thought, it is just a rock..
  8. Bone?

    Hey everyone! This was found in Southern California in Plio-Pleistocene and Pliocene loosely consolidated gravel and was wondering if it was bone? The area it was found in produces a bunch of petrified wood and possibly some Coprolite. What do you think? Thanks in advance!
  9. Arc Shell

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Tiny Dallarca elnia next to the head of a sewing pin from the Pliocene/Pleistocene micro matrix of the Nutrien Aurora/Lee Creek Phosphate Mine in Auora, North Carolina These got much, MUCH bigger!
  10. Arene tricarinata

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Tiny marine gastropod from the Pliocene/Pleistocene micro matrix of the Nutrien Aurora/Lee Creek Phosphate Mine in Auora, North Carolina
  11. Bryozoan

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Discoporella ? Pliocene/Pleistocene from Aurora Fossil Museum micro matrix Aurora, North Carolina Thanks to @Al Dente for the ID
  12. So Many Minis!

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    This assemblage came from one cup (about 340 ml) of micro matrix from Aurora Fossil Museum. Oddly, they are generally much larger than most of what I found in the rest of the matrix. They are all from either the Pliocene or Pleistocene. See album description.
  13. Shark Teeth Sizes

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    The large and the small of it: two shark teeth from Aurora's "Emergency Kit" next to a sewing pin. Pliocene/Pleistocene from Aurora Fossil Museum micro matrix Aurora, North Carolina
  14. Porgy Fish Tooth

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Family Sparidae Pliocene/Pleistocene from Aurora Fossil Museum micro matrix Aurora, North Carolina
  15. Pinfish Tooth

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Lagodon rhomboides about 3 mm long Pliocene/Pleistocene from Aurora Fossil Museum micro matrix Aurora, North Carolina
  16. A fossil in my fossil?

    Hello, I recently found these two alligator scutes in Manatee County, FL. Upon close inspection they both seem to have a piece of something dark lodged in them. It appears almost in the same place on both scutes. One of the dark spots has a very interesting shape to it, like it could be a fossil or mineral. The scutes were discovered less than an inch apart at a land site. What are the dark spots on these scutes? Thank you for looking. Marie
  17. Greetings, I found this tooth last week at a land site in Manatee County, Florida. It measures 1/4” (6.35 mm) wide on the chewing surface and 1/2” (12.7 mm) tall. Many thanks
  18. Hexanchus or Notorynchus

    I recently picked up three cow shark teeth with uncertain identifications. I can not be sure myself so I thought I’d get some help sorting this out. First one is 19mm and comes from the Pico Formation, Ventura County California. I believe it is Pliocene in age. I think it is a Hexanchus tooth but Notorynchus is known from at least one So Cal formation similar in age according to fossilworks. It is missing the largest cone. Even though I lean 6 Gill, I’m almost hoping somebody thinks 7 Gill because a California 7 Gill would be sweet lol Either way, it’s a really pretty tooth. Next are two from the Miocene deposits of Gironde France. Notorynchus and Hexanchus are both described from this location and they are small partials. I really can not figure out if I have two Notorynchus or one of each. I’m rooting for a 6 Gill but a great location to add regardless of the ID. All opinions are welcome.
  19. Is This a Fossil?

    Hey everyone! I was recently fossil hunting at Bolinas in California, which is known for its fossilized sand dollars. While hunting, I found this strange piece and I'm not sure if it's a fossil or not. It's from the Merced Formation, which is from the Late Pliocene to the Pleistocene in California. I have no clue what it is, but I am looking forward to hearing if anyone on the forum does. Thanks!
  20. Pliocene marines and a tooth.

    My family and I went away for the weekend to the coast. This specific coastal area is known for its pleistocene mammal fossils as well as msa artifacts and hominid fossils. The pictures below are of the beach scape, outcrops fossil roots and shells in situ. The other shell and sponge fossils where found in another location thats roughly 100m above sea level. The fossil tooth is from a cape porcupine.
  21. Molar cap

    It is hard finding days to hunt in South Florida. 95% of my locations are 3-4 feet over my head. It is only by marking and remembering low water locations that I get to continue in these heavy rain months. Even now the available locations are limited, and thus the finds can also be limited, but not today. This location is a Mio_Pliocene that can produce very rare items. My hunting buddy found the 1st. A badly worn (old individual) molar cap.. Usually the caps I find are unused, pristine, making them far easier to identify. The measurements around the edges are 17x 17x x 15.5. This is very small for the mammals that traditionally have caps in my hunting areas (Mastodon, peccary, tapir, dugong, manatee, please add others you can think of in Florida). All comments and suggestions appreciated.
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