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Found 544 results

  1. Thylacodes arenarius (Linnaeus 1758)

    From the album Gastropods and Bivalves Worldwide

    Worm snail belonging to the family Vermitidae. 4.5x2.5cm. Pliocene Oliveto, Castelflorentino, Toscana, Italy
  2. Worm Borings?

    Hey everyone just wanted to check in with you all and see how you are doing. I also wanted to inquire about these Worm Borings/Concretions, and what our members consensus might be. Maybe our resident concretion collector @Ruger9a would be able to help me out. Anyway, here are the pictures: Here is a photo of the excavation site:
  3. Hi All! Could you please help me to ID this specimen that was found 2019, Miami Beach, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. I'm hoping it is turtle coprolite from the pliocene. I have other pieces if that would help. Thank in advance!
  4. Crabs 3.jpg

    From the album Crustacean Fossils of the Pliocene era in South East Queensland.

    Sentinel crabs from the Pliocene era.
  5. Crabs 3.jpg

    From the album Crustacean Fossils of the Pliocene era in South East Queensland.

    Sentinel crabs from the Pliocene era.
  6. Crabs 3.jpg

    From the album Crustacean Fossils of the Pliocene era in South East Queensland.

    Sentinel crabs from the Pliocene era.
  7. Crabs 3.jpg

    From the album Crustacean Fossils of the Pliocene era in South East Queensland.

    Sentinel crabs from the Pliocene era.
  8. Crabs 3.jpg

    From the album Crustacean Fossils of the Pliocene era in South East Queensland.

    Sentinel crabs from the Pliocene era.
  9. Crabs 3.jpg

    From the album Crustacean Fossils of the Pliocene era in South East Queensland.

    Sentinel crabs from the Pliocene era.
  10. Crabs 3.jpg

    From the album Crustacean Fossils of the Pliocene era in South East Queensland.

    Sentinel crabs from the Pliocene era.
  11. Crabs 3.jpg

    From the album Crustacean Fossils of the Pliocene era in South East Queensland.

    Sentinel crabs from the Pliocene era.
  12. Crabs 3.jpg

    From the album Crustacean Fossils of the Pliocene era in South East Queensland.

    Sentinel crabs from the Pliocene era.
  13. SMR Triplofusus

    I assume this is a Triplofusus giganteus. I found it at the now closed SMR shell pit (Schroder-Manatee Ranch’s Aggregates) near Sarasota, Florida. I was wondering if this is the Pliocene version or the Pleistocene version? Are they different subspecies? I know this isn't the best one in the world, but it's nice. My gf wants it so badly, but I told her this one stays in my collection because it's from a site that's closed forever. I'm trying to find a substitute for her to make her happy. She wanted the long spindly one and she argued with me that I had plenty of shells already when I said no! So you see what I'm up against! Lol I have one other that would pass for this one, but of course it came from a shell pit that's been closed too! Could you help out a poor fellow fossil hunter like me? haha!
  14. Crustaceans found on beach.

    Hi, I would really appreciate an ID on these crustaceans found 2019 at Miami, Mermaid And Nobby beaches on the Gold Coast, Australia. I've done some basic research and came up with Pliocene era. Thankyou so much!
  15. I'm trying to ID this horse tooth from Peace River, Florida. Looks like a subhypsodont. My best guess is Merychippus, but please let me know what you think.
  16. Two new papers on fossil Balaenidae are available online: Guillaume Duboys de Lavigerie, Mark Bosselaers, Stijn Goolaerts, Travis Park, Olivier Lambert & Felix G. Marx (2020) New Pliocene right whale from Belgium informs balaenid phylogeny and function. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2020.1746422 Yoshihiro Tanaka; Hitoshi Furusawa; Masaichi Kimura (2020). A new member of fossil balaenid (Mysticeti, Cetacea) from the early Pliocene of Hokkaido, Japan. Royal Society Open Science. 7 (4): Article ID 192182. doi:10.1098/rsos.192182. Until recently, the diversity of extinct balaenids from Belgium was confined to three genera, Balaenotus, Balaenula, and Balaenella, but the description of Antwerpibalaena adds a new twist to balaenid diversity in the North Sea. Interestingly, Archaeobalaena was originally considered a specimen of Balaenula, but its recognition as a generically distinct form muddies waters with regards to the diversity of balaenids phylogenetically intermediate between Peripolocetus and crown Balaenidae. By the way, could I have a copy of the paper titled "New Pliocene right whale from Belgium informs balaenid phylogeny and function"?
  17. Hello, I'm looking for an ID on a relatively well preserved marine fossil found in a south florida gravel bed with many bivalve and brachiopod fossils nearby. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
  18. Mastodon or Mammoth toe bone?

    Hello everyone , I am reposting this along with a short video I uploaded to Google drive . My last post received no response and hoping someone might notice it this time that has some knowledge about the bone . I found this in the peace river in Florida . It is considered the Hawthorn Group, Peace River Formation, Bone Valley Member which ranges from Miocene to Pliocene. I believe it may be eithor a Mastodon or Mammoth toe bone. I included a picture that leads me to this and hope someone might agree and narrow it down for me. Thanks for looking ! Dimensions : 8" (200mm) one end is 5" (127mm) wide and the other is 4" (100mm) wide in the middle it's diameter is the size of a large male wrist . Weighs 1050 grams https://drive.google.com/file/d/10AOA0gvLDI5qLhzrRnenF3nk6kcUjZag/view?usp=drivesdk This is quick video (30 secs) of this fossil, (that's coco stuck her face in my video) that I uploaded to my personal Google drive, I hope it don't violate any forum policy.
  19. Small bone

    With extra time, I have been landscaping , sorting, and cleaning out fossil deposits around the house. I have rediscovered a number of unusual items. This being one of the most unusual. 3 to 1 marine versus land fossils. Once found a Llama sacrum that resembled this at 10-15x the size. Thought about fish nose, but never found one and really do not know.
  20. I took a trip yesterday (Easter Sunday) morning to a few river sites in a neighboring county. The first spot I went to is a Pliocene exposure of zone 2 Yorktown Formation. While I found the normal culprits of teeth, mako's, hemi's and a small meg; it was the unexpected find that made this trip. While I have found fragments, I have not found anywhere near a complete echinoid there. Well Easter changed that, the Echinoid Bunny left me a good egg. I found a gorgeous complete Arbacia improcera. A rare Pliocene echinoid, my first. As found: after the first cleaning: second cleaning: third and final cleaning:
  21. Mastodon or Mammoth toe bone?

    Hi again , I found this in the peace river in Nocatee , FL Looks like I found leg bone to something , It's approximately 8" (200mm) one end is 5" (127mm) wide and the other is 4" (100mm) wide in the middle it's diameter is the size of a large male wrist . Weighs 1050 grams . What you think ?
  22. Fossil plants provide clues to changing environments in Tennessee’s past. The Erwin record, April 11, 2020 https://www.erwinrecord.net/community-news/fossil-plants-provide-clues-to-changing-environments-in-tennessees-past/ Some random papers. Gong, F., Karsai, I. and Liu, Y.S.C., 2010. Vitis seeds (Vitaceae) from the late Neogene Gray fossil site, northeastern Tennessee, USA. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 162(1), pp.71-83. https://dc.etsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C19&q=Gray+Fossil+Site&btnG=&httpsredir=1&article=3171&context=etd Shunk, A.A.J., 2009. Late Tertiary paleoclimate and stratigraphy of the Gray Fossil Site (eastern TN) and Pipe Creek Sinkhole (northcentral IN) (Doctoral dissertation) Baylor Unversity, Waco, TX https://baylor-ir.tdl.org/handle/2104/5303 Shunk, A.J., Driese, S.G. and Dunbar, J.A., 2009. Late Tertiary paleoclimatic interpretation from lacustrine rhythmites in the Gray Fossil Site, northeastern Tennessee, USA. Journal of Paleolimnology, 42(1), pp.11-24. https://www.academia.edu/11963313/Late_Tertiary_paleoclimatic_interpretation_from_lacustrine_rhythmites_in_the_Gray_Fossil_Site_northeastern_Tennessee_USA https://www.academia.edu/23862396/Late_Tertiary_paleoclimatic_interpretation_from_lacustrine_rhythmites_in_the_Gray_Fossil_Site_northeastern_Tennessee_USA Whitelaw, J.L., Mickus, K., Whitelaw, M.J. and Nave, J., 2008. High-resolution gravity study of the Gray Fossil S ite. Geophysics, 73(2), pp.B25-B32. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249865308_High-resolution_gravity_study_of_the_Gray_Fossil_Site https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kevin_Mickus/2 Worobiec, E., Liu, Y.S.C. and Zavada, M.S., 2013. Palaeoenvironment of late Neogene lacustrine sediments at the Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee, USA. In Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae (Vol. 83, No. 1, pp. 51-63). https://geojournals.pgi.gov.pl/asgp/article/viewFile/12589/11062 https://geojournals.pgi.gov.pl/asgp/article/view/12589 Zobaa, M.K., Zavada, M.S., Whitelaw, M.J., Shunk, A.J. and Oboh-Ikuenobe, F.E., 2011. Palynology and palynofacies analyses of the Gray Fossil Site, eastern Tennessee: their role in understanding the basin-fill history. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 308(3-4), pp.433-444. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Zavada/publication/277307790_Palynology_of_the_Gray_Fossil_Site_eastern_Tennessee_its_role_in_understanding_the_basin_fill_history/links/562905a908ae518e347c704b.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  23. Vokesinotus lamellosus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Vokesinotus lamellosus (Emmons, 1858) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Emmons (1958) first described Fusus lamellosus from the Miocene (now Pliocene) of North Carolina and Dall (1890) described Coralliophaga lepidotus from the Pliocene (now Lower Pleistocene) of Florida. Olsson & Harbinson (1953) figured Trophon lepidotus from the Caloosahatchee Formation, however Campbell (1993) listed Urosalpinx lepidotus in the Pliocene of Florida, North Carolina and Virginia overlooking lamellosus entirely. Those shells in the Caloosahatchee have a lower spire than the predominate shells in the Tamiami although some with lower spire heights can be found. For this reason I have chosen V. lamellosus as the high spired species and V. vokesinotus with the lower spire height. If both are the same, the proper name would V. lamellosus with V. lepidotus as a junior synonym by 32 years.
  24. Vokesinotus lepidotus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Vokesinotus lepidotus (Dall, 1890) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Similar to V. perrugata except ribs flare out forming winged varices.
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