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Found 18 results

  1. The brachiopod fauna of the Leighton Formation is so small that I don't often find one that needs some help with identification. This individual does. The closest brachiopod that has the same characteristics is Eoplectodonta (=Plectambonites) transversalis, but it only occurs in the Dennys Formation. The Dennys Fm has quite a different fauna from the Leighton, but it is the closest thing I could find. My other option was some sort of small spiriferid. I will have to defer to @Tidgy's Dad for this one. Below are two pictures of it, first of the cast, and second of the external mold
  2. Well, it has been a while since a post on the Silurian Leighton Fm. Had to make a trip due to family matters, and once I got back had a lot of work to do. I finally got into a position to start splitting and prepping more shale, and found this new little guy. I am torn between an operculum of a gastropod, and an inarticulate brachiopod. My main argument for an operculum is because of the shape - the only inarticulate brachiopods in this formation are Orbiculoidea and Pholidops. Unfortunately, I cannot find any reliable papers on the brachiopod Pholidops, it looks very similar but
  3. This is a recent prep I undertook - a rather incomplete specimen of a Chonetes bastini, a species of brachiopod from the Leighton Formation. I picked this one as a practice piece to try some new techniques on, and was hoping for any tips on different finishes for the matrix. I have heard that beeswax was often used for the matrix to make it appear darker, but did not know the proper methods or appliance techniques. Any thoughts on the finished product are also appreciated! The specimen itself is missing the upper right left of its shell, and only has two spines present (upper rig
  4. I am really puzzled on this new one, I have explored phyllocarids, trilobites, and many others, and can't seem to find a good match for it. I am not absolutely positive it is a fossil though, just the surface texture and way it prepped makes me think it is. It is from the Leighton Fm, which is Silurian, Pridoli. When I first started prepping this, I was under the impression that this was the internal mold of a Chonetes bastini, which is why I started on it. I soon discovered though that it couldn't be from a brachiopod, and now I am stumped on it. The first specimen is completely
  5. Mainefossils

    Leighton Formation Conodont?

    So, I have just found this highly-suspect fossil - my guess is a conodont. I saw it as I was examining pieces of shale, and thought it was worth looking at under the microscope. It seems to have the diagnostic features, even the transition of colors between the blue base and white tips. I was hoping for some of your options on it. If this is a conodont, it would be the first from this formation. My guess would be a Ozarkadina sp - it is a very common Silurian conodont here, and some of the elements look remarkably similar to my specimen. This specimen came from the very fossilifer
  6. Mainefossils

    Coprolite?

    I have just found this little coprolite? yesterday. This is the second time a coprolite-like fossil has turned up in the shale from the Leighton Fm. I am not really sure on this one, though, due to the presence of crinoid stems. The fossil(s) are from the Leighton Formation, Maine; which is Pridoli, Silurian. The main reason I think it is a coprolite is because of its situation in the shale. The rest of the shale around it is relatively uniform, with no fossils whatsoever. The fossils present in it are one crinoid stem, quite a few ostracods, a very small Orbiculoidea brachiopod,
  7. Mainefossils

    Phyllocarid valve?

    This morning I split this shale (technically it fell apart on me), and found this interesting little fossil. I was thinking that there was a possibility of it being a phyllocarid valve, but I have never seen one. This also raises a question that I have been wondering - how do you differentiate between a phyllocarid and a bivalve valve when the tail is absent? What raised my suspicions on this specimen are the raised bumps on the external mold and the depressions on the cast. The pictures below are of the specimen. The first shows the cast/internal mold, and the second the externa
  8. Mainefossils

    Rhynchotrema sp?

    I am unsure on the identification of this brachiopod. It is from the Leighton Formation, Maine; which is Silurian, Pridoli. According to Maine's Paleozoic Record (an excellent book that lists all the fauna and flora found in formations across Maine), there are only two Rhynchonellid genera in this formation, Camarotoechia and Rhynchotrema. It does not look like a Camarotoechia, but I cannot find many references for the internal mold of Rhynchotrema brachiopods. I would appreciate any references you have on this genus, as well as any advice on the identification of it (@Tidgy's Dad
  9. Mainefossils

    Camarotoechia brachiopod

    I finished prepping this specimen recently, an unidentified Camarotoechia brachiopod. It exhibits an uncommon/rare orange coloration; only about 1/100 of Camarotoechia brachiopods show it. This one, though, unfortunately has some compression damage on the right side, and some of the ridges have pieces missing. The pictures below first show the pre-prep photo (which I finally remembered to take), and the post-prep. Thanks everyone for reading!
  10. Mainefossils

    Platyceras sp.

    I have a nice little gastropod in my collection, from my most recent trip to the Leighton formation. I am pretty certain that this is a Platyceras sp, such as the one shown in the plate below, figures 23 - 24. Boucot, A. J., Yochelson, E. L. (1966) Paleozoic Gastropoda from the Moose River Synclinorium, Northern Maine. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 503(A). https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0503a/report.pdf I do not believe that specimens such as these have been assigned to species as of yet, and would greatly appreciate to hear any
  11. I have just found this microfossil. It is unfortunately incomplete, but the general shape is still discernible. I have two ideas for this specimen, a fish scale or an inarticulate brachiopod. Of these possibilities, I think that inarticulate brachiopod is more probable. The shape, "growth rings", and slight depression in the top lead me to this conclusion. On the other hand, its size, color, and the absence of such brachiopods from this formation, lead me towards fish scale. I am uncertain on both, and could use some help with this one. The specimen is the from the Leighton Formati
  12. Mainefossils

    Tentaculite species identification

    I have found a few Tentaculites specimens from the Leighton Formation, Maine; which is Pridoli, Silurian. I was wondering if it is possible to ID them to species, based on the external molds alone. I have read in a few papers that many tentaculite species are identified by the number and shape of the rings on the shell exterior. Unfortunately, I have not been able to many definitive papers on USA Tentaculites sp, and their identification. The specimen below is only of the external mold. This is the best preserved, as well as smallest, of the specimens that I have collected.
  13. I have just finished preparing this little fossil. I really have not seen anything like it. It reminds me of a eurypterid head fragment, or something similar, but the ridges on the "internal mold" are perplexing. Also, it is horizontally symmetrical, suggesting a scale or segment. It is from the Leighton Formation, Maine; which is Pridoli, Silurian. The pictures below first show the "internal mold" under raking light, than of it under direct light. The third picture is of the "external mold" under direct light. It does not have any surface detail that would be brought out by rakin
  14. Mainefossils

    Gastropod ID

    So, I have been preparing this nice little gastropod. I have seen five other specimens that shared the same characteristics, but, unfortunately, some of them did not make it. Before I continued to prep this one, I was wondering if it is possible to roughly ID this gastropod. It would greatly facilitate prep work to have a good idea of its shape. All the specimens I have seen have had three whorls. The upper two whorl's ridges are almost absent, this has been consistent through all my specimens. The shape of the shell is coeloconoid. It was found in the Leighton Formati
  15. Mainefossils

    Fish Coprolite?

    I have read in multiple papers that there are three theories to the preservation of thelodont scales. First, a rapid burial when the thelodonts have died under still circumstances, e. g., in a lagoon or other still body of water. This results in associated scales. Second, the thelodonts die and disintegrate in the open ocean, leaving behind disassociated scales. Third, the thelodonts were eaten, and deposited as coprolites. Now, I have just found an array of thelodont scales in a single small spot. The stone they are preserved in is a lighter color than the rest of the shale. The
  16. Mainefossils

    Unknown Leighton Formation Fossil

    When I first started prepping this one, only the tip of the bottom right corner was showing. I initially that that it was a trilobite free cheek, which is quite a common find for this formation. About half-way through, I realized that it was not what I had initially thought. Now that I see it fully prepped, I have absolutely no idea what it is. Approximately half of it had crumbled before I started preparing it, due to the soft siltstone it was preserved in. Any help would be greatly appreciated. The pictures are taken with direct light, as there are no small details on the surfac
  17. Mainefossils

    Unknown fossil (myodocope ostracod?)

    I have been finding these small little fossils all through my specimens from the Leighton Formation, which is Pridoli. I suspect that they are myodocope ostracods, but I haven't found any ostracods that match it from my available literature. The specimen below appears to be an association of two valves. Each individual valve has a small protuberance in the middle, with two pits next to it; they are approximately 4 millimeters long, by 1.5 millimeters wide. The pictures below are first of photo with direct lighting, then a photo with raking light, to show the protuberances. Any hel
  18. Mainefossils

    Actinopteria bella

    Actinopteria bella is a species of bivalve found in the Leighton/Pembroke Fm, and first described by Henry S. Williams. It is differentiated from A. fornicata by less convexity in its shell and a wider beak. It is differentiated from A. dispar by its shorter shell. The above pictures are of the left valve. A poorly preserved original or cast of the shell exterior is on the left side. Some of the exterior of the shell may be missing since the exterior ribs have less than normal height. The right photo is an exterior impression or mold. Some of the shell may be present on
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