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  1. Hello, last Saturday (10/09/2021), I visited again some classic fossil sites at Waagraben, Hieflau, northern Styria, Austria with a friend. These sites are known since around 1850, are probably of Coniacian age and belong to the Gosau-group. First, some maps: Overview with location of Waaggraben in Styria, a geological map from Ampferer, 1935 (1 = rudists; 2 = Trochactaeon; 3 = Conglomerate quarry), topo-map, and DEM. These sites are very well known, so no problem to pinpoint them exactly on maps: On the way. We will meet this guy in the backgrou
  2. Hello, Another hunting trip for rudists to the Campanian of St. Bartholomä in western Styria, Austria (09/15/2019). I have hunted these heaps of stones, collected from the former nearby fields (now meadows) over centuries, several times before, but there seems to be always something to find. I found six "good" specimens in 2 hours - and that´s exactly my usual yield in this formation . First topo map, geological map, relief map and aerial photograph of "Point 32". No problem to make everything public, nobody is interested in this stuff (well, except me...). Views fr
  3. marguy

    rudists to see

    Hello, my wife and I went to Charente to meet uncles and aunts that we had not seen for several years. A few kilometers from their home, walls and old houses in a hamlet are built with recycled materials: rudist fossils !!! here are some photos (on the first, it was not the cars that threw the fossils ) We walked through the surrounding countryside but the vegetation covers the ground, and only a corn field and a walnut plantation left some bare land where we found mostly broken pieces, but in the end a nice coral and 2 decent rudists for our pleasure. Enjoy. (I thi
  4. Karam

    Fossil?

    Hello! Found yesterday, although I'm not even sure what it is. I put rudists in the tag section since someone told me if you don't know what it is, then it's probably a rudist (especially in Lebanon). I would also like to mention that those patterns are not only on one side, rather they're everywhere even on the small pieces that fell off while i separated it from a bigger rock.
  5. Saturday, 02/06/2021 St. Bartholomä-Formation (Campanian), Styria, Austria - mainly rudists of the hippuritid and radiolitid family. This was my first fossil trip since more then 3 months due to too much Covid first and too much snow lately. But now snow has melted, at least in St. Bartholomä. Note: Austria is still in so-called "hard lockdown", but you can drive around like crazy in our country, as long as you stay in your car overnight . I did not, I am doing only day trips, and St. Bartholomä is only a 30 km drive. - First I visited two low-productive sites, check
  6. Hi all! Perhaps this is a dumb question, but I' still new to the forum as well as the hobby itself, so I offer a teaching moment - In round rock, (just north of austin in central texas), I have a location at the base of a limestone cliff where after some gritty mining efforts I've come across an extremely dense pocket of what I've been informed are internal casts of rudists. That ID was great!, but I'm having trouble learning about what the actual organisms were like. I've tried researching quite a bit with no clear picture of what these are that I'm discovering. Also geologic maps
  7. I've been slowly working my way thru some specimens I collected this summer. I often sort stuff out and tackle one group/order at a time. So I am sorting out some of the rudists that are found at one of my favorite Glen Rose Formation locations. The site is rich with a seriously diverse fauna that includes at least 4 species of rudists. Rudists were rather weirdly shaped bivalves that went extinct at the end of the Mesozoic. They are also, most often, only found locked into hard rock and difficult to collect. But this local produces at least two that you can pick up complete and two that g
  8. From time to time, I would like to post specimens from the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation in Styria, Austria, in this thread. For the first specimen, I was motivated by this thread: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/91459-is-this-a-rudist-fossil/ So the first specimen is a fragment of a large Vaccinites alpinus, with only two pillars - and not much else. Franz Bernhard
  9. Hello, some local Campanian news again... . First: The rudists from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria, made into a local journal (pdf, in German): DieRudistenvonStBartholomae_Mineralog_2019.pdf Second: After this nice find at point 25-North from 09/24/2019: Point 25-North - 09/24/2019 I could not resist collecting this site systematically. 18 hours of work in October and November 2019 resulted in more than 100 fossils, which is a very good yield. For details see: Point 25-North - Four weeks (External site, in German, only a few pics). Th
  10. Hello, I have summarized my hunting trips to St. Bartholomä from July 2019 to September 2019. Its in German and located at an external site: Rudists St. Bartholomä - July-Sept 2019 (external site) (pdf, ca. 4.2 MB) Fell free to delete this post if you find it inappropriate. Thanks! Franz Bernhard
  11. Hello, today I had another opportunity to fossil hunt in St. Bartholomä. I tidied mostly up my main dig and collecting site in the quarry at Point 25 east of Kalchberg. As expected, I did not find much, only some small so-so specimens (19 specimens in 3 hours, but the majority would be rejects). However, in the same small quarry, a few meters to the north of the main dig site, "Knödelbrekzie" is also exposed (upper part of lower right pic), with some steep scree below. I have found two good rudists in this scree two years ago. Today, I dug again with bare hands in the scree. F
  12. Hello, this time, I will start with the end result : I am quite satisfied with the result ! The pillars are nicely preserved and the rudist is filled with sparry, white to orange calcite and contains some voids coated with tiny calcite crystals. The greenish batches consist also of calcite and are also well polished, but are finer grained and contain additionally some small quartz grains. These fillings may be related to the second filling event during redeposition of the rudists in this formation. For more info about that, see here: Some Rudists from St. Bartholomä T
  13. Short hunt at the North Sulphur River Texas. Lots of mosasaur bones.
  14. FranzBernhard

    Rudist ID help

    Hello, I would like to ask, if somebody has seen such rudist traverse sections somewhere else (first und second post). Compared to the other four, abundant species (third post, for comparison), these three types are rare in the St. Bartholomä-formation and these are all that I have. Both apical and adapical views of this rare ones are shown, if possible. Some of them I have already posted on TFF, but here they are all together. They are all from the Campian St. Bartholomä-formation in Styria, Austria (Gosau-group, Eastern Alps). The specimens labeled Vaccinites cf. sulcatus come
  15. Hello, just to show off some polished rudists from the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation, Styria, Austria, collected from March 2018 to September 2018. https://franzbernhard.lima-city.de/Radiolitidae_04bis09_2018.html https://franzbernhard.lima-city.de/Hippurites_04bis09_2018.html https://franzbernhard.lima-city.de/Vaccinites_04bis09_2018.html Enjoy! Ah, and if someone is interested in "Punkt 25" : http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/blogs/entry/341-introduction-to-point-25/ http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/blogs/entry/342-point-25-wha
  16. Here are the numbers I promised : From 07/16/2017 to 09/13/2018, about 140 hippuridit rudist specimens were found in the scree slope of "Point 25", the sweetest of all spots in St. Bartholomä. The species distribution is (approximate numbers, with examples): Hippurites colliciatus: 80 (with 140 individuals – many pseudocolonies!) - F, G, H, J Hippurites nabresinensis: 10 - I and possibly K Vaccinites vesiculosus: 25 - A, B Vaccinites alpinus: 10 - C Vaccinites cf. sulcatus: 5 - D, E Vaccinites sp.: 10 (no pillars visible, but to nice to be cut, or partial spe
  17. Fine, a very nice rudist - a Hippurites nabresinensis -, one of the longest I have found so far in St. Bartholomä (18 cm). But it came even better! At home, I recognized that I have already seen a quite similar traverse fracture before. Indeed, here it is, with the cleaned traverse fracture of the newly found rudist below. Maximum diameter is about 7.5 cm. The two parts fit together (considering that there are at least 100 years of weathering between them), resulting in the by far tallest rudist found by me in St. Bartholomä up to now, having a total length of about 27
  18. Now the sandstone slab behind the red x (last photo of the previous entry) has been removed. Can you spot it, just above the pocket knife? Photo taken 09/13/2018. Closer… Closest! There was a large rudist just behind the sandstone slab, lying in a depth of about 40 cm below the surface of the scree slope. Still in situ, only some roots and small stones removed for the photo. Pocket knife is 9 cm long, some tapering of the rudist is clearly visible. Such a nice surprise is very rare, normally the rudists are quite dirty there and you can only recognize a few
  19. For some general information, including some maps, about the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation in Styria, Austria see: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/86433-rudist-hunting-in-st-bartholomä-styria-austria-13072018/ The rudist-bearing St. Bartholomä-formation covers an area of about 3km2. Within this area, there are a few sweet spots, where rudist can be found with some confidence: one of the creeks west of Kalchberg; a pile of rocks west of Kalchberg, collected during centuries from the nearby fields; a small, weathered outcrop along a narrow forest road, also west of
  20. Quer

    Rudists' casts ?

    Hi everyone, Some weeks ago, I found those pair of pieces at the foot of a Pyrenees cliff (Maastrichtian limestone strata), which was stuffed with rudists (radiolidae). They have an extremely smooth surface that confused me. After some fantasies about teeth, bones and so on, I realized that the clue had to be around. My ID guess is: rudist's (radiolitidae) casts, separated from shell by wheatering and erosion. I'll explain it with some pictures taken at the same place, inserted in a fictional sequence (I do not intend they are same species or
  21. Hello, just to show off some of my finds of Hippurites from August to October 2017 in the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach - St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria. Upper right: 5x Hippurites colliciatus Woodward, 1855 Lower left: 4x Hippurites nabresinensis Futterer, 1893 If you are interested in field photographs etc., see: https://franzbernhard.lima-city.de/SanktBartholomae_Fossilfunde_Hippuritidae_Teil_3.pdf https://franzbernhard.lima-city.de/SanktBartholomae_Fossilfunde_Hippuritidae_Teil_2.pdf (in german) Franz
  22. markhero

    Rudists or... creatures?!

    Hello! These pictures are in situ of a fossil locality I discoveted in Argolis area of Greece. The age is Upper Cretaceus (Cenomanian). I believe that there are lots of Rudists fossils in sections, the ones with circular shapes. But between them there are lots of objects similar to "fish spines" as seen on the below pictures. Are they also sections of Rudists but sliced vertically? Thank you in advance!
  23. North Sulphur River Texas was pretty picked over but I managed to find a nice variety. I found Mosasaur, Cretaceous Turtle, Ammonite, Enchodus / Shark Teeth, Ice Age Tooth, Rudists, Mastodon Tooth Enamel and one artifact in the creek. NSR needs a good rain.
  24. Short morning NSR hunt with a fellow TFF member wrfisherman. We had a good time but it was dry and the area had been hunted. I did find a chunk of turtle (protostegid costal), a piece of fish rib, a cool red baculites and a nice piece of rudists.
  25. Dear Madam / Sir, Here are two Lower Turonian rudist cross-sections collected from central Tunisia. Can you please recognize the Subclass, or maybe the order, of these latter. Thank you.
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