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  1. Kathleen Byrd

    fossil found

    I found this fossil on my property at top of Laurelas Grade in Hidden Hills off Carmel Valley Rd. state of Calif. It appears to be some kind of fish. Can anyone give any more information on what this could be? Entire size of rock is approx 6" wide. I have found lots of mollusk type fossils but never a fish. thanks kathleen
  2. David Gllutierrez

    Sandstone in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA fossil?

    Found this about 10’-12’ deep while digging a soil sample in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA. I’m located on the peninsula, 575 feet above sea level. Object weighs 2.5 lbs and is pretty solid. Noticed a very small shell imprint. Ignore dark colors, it was damp from cleaning. any ideas on what it might be?
  3. Fossilizedfuntimes

    FISH FIN or possibly SEA URCHIN SKELETON???

    I found this rock in the middle of ARIZONA, Gila County, USA. I've found thousands of fossils in Central Arizona & have identified most, but not sure on some of them, this being one;) It weighs in at approximately 135 lbs or just over 61 Kilos & my back's still feeling that one. Thanks, Joshua
  4. Hi everyone, I'm Roger. I need some advices to proceed with the preparation of vertebrate material from Cretaceous marine sandstones of the Parras Basin in northeastern Mexico. I have some isolated mosasaurid centra with adhered matrix (mainly sandstone, as well shale) and some tiny shark teeth embedded in sandstone. I seek to use chemical methods. I have heard of the use of dimethyl sulfoxide but have never actually used it, if anyone has experience with this reagent I would love to hear your feedback. I am not opposed to working with mechanical methods, but I do not have the nece
  5. Today, I found one small piece of fossil-like thing in a sandstone rock. I found it in a valley, where there is one small river with rocks which contain many brachiopods, coral, favosites fossils. But this one is different, it is in one piece of soft sandstone rock, others are in harder rocks. Western boarder of the great basin of Sichuan, China. petal_20221129_222903.mp4
  6. ThePhysicist

    Texas Red Beds

    From the album: Permian

    Some of the famous Texas "red beds" deposited during the Early Permian in streams and rivers, seen near Seymour, TX (member of the Clear Fork Group). Iron in the sand oxidized, giving the stones their eponymous color.
  7. dbrake40

    Mystery Fossil Need ID

    This ‘fossil’ was found on a river gravel bar in Southern Minnesota. Sedimentary layers in the area include Wisconsin lobe glacial till and cretaceous mudstone/sandstone. The centre of this specimen seems to be just sedimentary material that is slightly harder than the surrounding material filling the core. The outer shell seems to be rock. I am totally stumped. eems to be rock. I am totally stumped.
  8. dino joe

    What is it #3

  9. nickja

    petrified fern trunk?

    Hi I found this petrified log of some sort in a sandstone cliff near Inverness Cape Breton Island and am wondering if anyone here knows what it would have been interesting looking pattern around the outside its how I would imagine the bark of a giant fern/ palm tree trunk would have looked long ago , also does anyone know how I could clean it up and bring out more of the bark like texture without damaging the fossil?
  10. aplomado

    Is this a tetrapod trackway?

    My father pointed this possible trackway on a sandstone paving stone on his front walk. I don't know the source of the rock. It looks clearer in person than on the images. There are several possible tracks in sequence- I took a picture of the only one that looks mostly complete (last image, with quarter). Other pavers in the path have odd marks that look sort of like drag marks from vegetation, bubbles, or worm or crab tracks. (not pictured on this post). What do you all think?
  11. dclucker

    Are these fossils? What type

    What is your guess on these?
  12. BurleyEastCoast

    Ocean Life? Tail? Curious what this is...

    Hoping for help with the ID of what is believed to be a ocean life fossil in sandstone. My keen 8 year old found this over the weekend along the base of a sandstone bank. General location is Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada. Thanks
  13. If this topic was posted in the wrong place feel free to pull out the whips and chains. These are being found at deposit of petrified wood in south Alabama. Silicification strata sure looks favorable in situ-clay, then 1 foot of wet sand and rounded quartzite, then the wood. No limb nots, most of it has straight parallel bands like a vascular plant. Occasionally some samples with annual rings. Complete logs are rare, most are segments from 5 to 50 pounds. It seems related to Tallahatta silicified sand(stone). And it seems to have silicified grey sand in it.
  14. Hello everyone, I am currently staying at the Mountain Lake Biological Station in Giles County Virginia doing research on evolution (on living animals not fossils) and yesterday I decided to take a walk around mountain lake. This lake and the hotel next to it was actually the location that the movie Dirty Dancing was filmed in but due to natural geological processes the lake is now almost completely drained. This draining has revealed a lot of the sandstone and limestone that once made up the lake bed. I was not going here looking for fossils but when I sat down to rest I saw the Pygidium of a
  15. Warbreaker

    Possible triceratops nose horn

    Found this piece associated with weathering bone chunks embedded in sandstone. My first thought was nose horn but the horn portion looks like it might be a sandstone cast of the inside of the horn. Location Glendive montana, hell creek. What do you guys think?
  16. Found these along a creek bed about 30 miles inland at about 500 ft. elevation. Any ideas?
  17. C.onnor

    Fossil ID

    Found this fossil in a creek, wanted to know if it's a snake or worm or something. It's in a sandstone rock, just laying on a bunch of rocks on the creek bed
  18. I have read the bits here and elsewhere about DMSO. I'm not that serious and I'm not sure that's what I'd want anyway. Being new and my first post, I hope it's in the right place. I have some sandstone which was a big clump. Fairly beat up from being in Lake Michigan. I looked and decided to crack it open and see what's inside. Now I have a few pieces and I see some interesting fossils, but they look like the same material, nearly, as the surrounding sandstone. I can only guess that if I try to dissolve the sandstone, I'll probably also dissolve the fossils? These look like sh
  19. Konodioda

    What can this possibly be?

    Can someone please help me identify this. I don't know how old it is. I found this in Rockford Illinois, I found this in a roadcut. A fossil I found near it lived in the Ordovician period.
  20. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Ethiopian Amber Wenchit River Valley North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia “Tertiary Sediments” (23-16 Ma) Lighting: 140lm LED Longwave UV (365nm) Specimens: Spec. A (Marcasite): 11.2g / 27x20x31mm (in image) Spec. B (Large Yellow): 8.0g / 41x30x20mm Spec. C (Flow Lines): 8.4g / 34x31x20mm

    © Kaegen Lau

  21. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    6.4g specimen measuring 40x25x14mm (see related entry). This is incredibly-rare material, with next to no information available on it; this copal originates from sandstone deposits and can be found both in-situ and ex-situ. This particular specimen was recovered from a farmer's field in rural Costa Rica many years ago, and is part of a small lot of similar material; unfortunately, the specific location of the deposit this specimen came from is unknown. This material is noticeably harder than Colombian copal, but still reacts to acetone; the exterior of this piece has a slight layer of sandston

    © Kaegen Lau

  22. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    6.4g specimen measuring 40x25x14mm (see related entry). This is incredibly-rare material, with next to no information available on it; this copal originates from sandstone deposits and can be found both in-situ and ex-situ. This particular specimen was recovered from a farmer's field in rural Costa Rica many years ago, and is part of a small lot of similar material; unfortunately, the specific location of the deposit this specimen came from is unknown. This material is noticeably harder than Colombian copal, but still reacts to acetone; the exterior of this piece has a slight layer of sandston

    © Kaegen Lau

  23. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    10.0g specimen measuring 48x40x11mm (see associated entry). This is incredibly-rare material, with next to no information available on it; this copal originates from sandstone deposits and can be found both in-situ and ex-situ. This particular specimen was recovered from a farmer's field in rural Costa Rica many years ago, and is part of a small lot of similar material; unfortunately, the specific location of the deposit this specimen came from is unknown. This material is noticeably harder than Colombian copal, but still reacts to acetone; the exterior of this piece has a light layer of sands
  24. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    10.0g specimen measuring 48x40x11mm (see associated entry). This is incredibly-rare material, with next to no information available on it; this copal originates from sandstone deposits and can be found both in-situ and ex-situ. This particular specimen was recovered from a farmer's field in rural Costa Rica many years ago, and is part of a small lot of similar material; unfortunately, the specific location of the deposit this specimen came from is unknown. This material is noticeably harder than Colombian copal, but still reacts to acetone; the exterior of this piece has a light layer of sands
  25. Rogue Embryo

    Reduction spots and microbial life

    Was examining several of my rocks (sandstone & mudstone) that have light-coloured spots, such as the images of 3 rocks below. I read "Reduction Spots in the Mesoproterozoic Age: implications for life in the early terrestrial record" (Spinks, Parnell, Bowden) -- well, the little that I could understand -- and was wondering whether any of these 3 rocks might be an example of this. The spots in my rocks do not seem to have the "dark concretionary cores" that the article says are often present in the spots, but I was curious to know more. I'm having doubts but thought I'd ask. Thanks for any i
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