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  1. dclucker

    Are these fossils? What type

    What is your guess on these?
  2. BurleyEastCoast

    Ocean Life? Tail? Curious what this is...

    Hoping for help with the ID of what is believed to be a ocean life fossil in sandstone. My keen 8 year old found this over the weekend along the base of a sandstone bank. General location is Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada. Thanks
  3. If this topic was posted in the wrong place feel free to pull out the whips and chains. These are being found at deposit of petrified wood in south Alabama. Silicification strata sure looks favorable in situ-clay, then 1 foot of wet sand and rounded quartzite, then the wood. No limb nots, most of it has straight parallel bands like a vascular plant. Occasionally some samples with annual rings. Complete logs are rare, most are segments from 5 to 50 pounds. It seems related to Tallahatta silicified sand(stone). And it seems to have silicified grey sand in it.
  4. aplomado

    Is this a tetrapod trackway?

    My father pointed this possible trackway on a sandstone paving stone on his front walk. I don't know the source of the rock. It looks clearer in person than on the images. There are several possible tracks in sequence- I took a picture of the only one that looks mostly complete (last image, with quarter). Other pavers in the path have odd marks that look sort of like drag marks from vegetation, bubbles, or worm or crab tracks. (not pictured on this post). What do you all think?
  5. Hello everyone, I am currently staying at the Mountain Lake Biological Station in Giles County Virginia doing research on evolution (on living animals not fossils) and yesterday I decided to take a walk around mountain lake. This lake and the hotel next to it was actually the location that the movie Dirty Dancing was filmed in but due to natural geological processes the lake is now almost completely drained. This draining has revealed a lot of the sandstone and limestone that once made up the lake bed. I was not going here looking for fossils but when I sat down to rest I saw the Pygidium of a
  6. Warbreaker

    Possible triceratops nose horn

    Found this piece associated with weathering bone chunks embedded in sandstone. My first thought was nose horn but the horn portion looks like it might be a sandstone cast of the inside of the horn. Location Glendive montana, hell creek. What do you guys think?
  7. Found these along a creek bed about 30 miles inland at about 500 ft. elevation. Any ideas?
  8. C.onnor

    Fossil ID

    Found this fossil in a creek, wanted to know if it's a snake or worm or something. It's in a sandstone rock, just laying on a bunch of rocks on the creek bed
  9. I have read the bits here and elsewhere about DMSO. I'm not that serious and I'm not sure that's what I'd want anyway. Being new and my first post, I hope it's in the right place. I have some sandstone which was a big clump. Fairly beat up from being in Lake Michigan. I looked and decided to crack it open and see what's inside. Now I have a few pieces and I see some interesting fossils, but they look like the same material, nearly, as the surrounding sandstone. I can only guess that if I try to dissolve the sandstone, I'll probably also dissolve the fossils? These look like sh
  10. Konodioda

    What can this possibly be?

    Can someone please help me identify this. I don't know how old it is. I found this in Rockford Illinois, I found this in a roadcut. A fossil I found near it lived in the Ordovician period.
  11. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Ethiopian Amber Wenchit River Valley North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia “Tertiary Sediments” (23-16 Ma) Lighting: 140lm LED Longwave UV (365nm) Specimens: Spec. A (Marcasite): 11.2g / 27x20x31mm (in image) Spec. B (Large Yellow): 8.0g / 41x30x20mm Spec. C (Flow Lines): 8.4g / 34x31x20mm

    © Kaegen Lau

  12. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    6.4g specimen measuring 40x25x14mm (see related entry). This is incredibly-rare material, with next to no information available on it; this copal originates from sandstone deposits and can be found both in-situ and ex-situ. This particular specimen was recovered from a farmer's field in rural Costa Rica many years ago, and is part of a small lot of similar material; unfortunately, the specific location of the deposit this specimen came from is unknown. This material is noticeably harder than Colombian copal, but still reacts to acetone; the exterior of this piece has a slight layer of sandston

    © Kaegen Lau

  13. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    6.4g specimen measuring 40x25x14mm (see related entry). This is incredibly-rare material, with next to no information available on it; this copal originates from sandstone deposits and can be found both in-situ and ex-situ. This particular specimen was recovered from a farmer's field in rural Costa Rica many years ago, and is part of a small lot of similar material; unfortunately, the specific location of the deposit this specimen came from is unknown. This material is noticeably harder than Colombian copal, but still reacts to acetone; the exterior of this piece has a slight layer of sandston

    © Kaegen Lau

  14. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    10.0g specimen measuring 48x40x11mm (see associated entry). This is incredibly-rare material, with next to no information available on it; this copal originates from sandstone deposits and can be found both in-situ and ex-situ. This particular specimen was recovered from a farmer's field in rural Costa Rica many years ago, and is part of a small lot of similar material; unfortunately, the specific location of the deposit this specimen came from is unknown. This material is noticeably harder than Colombian copal, but still reacts to acetone; the exterior of this piece has a light layer of sands
  15. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    10.0g specimen measuring 48x40x11mm (see associated entry). This is incredibly-rare material, with next to no information available on it; this copal originates from sandstone deposits and can be found both in-situ and ex-situ. This particular specimen was recovered from a farmer's field in rural Costa Rica many years ago, and is part of a small lot of similar material; unfortunately, the specific location of the deposit this specimen came from is unknown. This material is noticeably harder than Colombian copal, but still reacts to acetone; the exterior of this piece has a light layer of sands
  16. Rogue Embryo

    Reduction spots and microbial life

    Was examining several of my rocks (sandstone & mudstone) that have light-coloured spots, such as the images of 3 rocks below. I read "Reduction Spots in the Mesoproterozoic Age: implications for life in the early terrestrial record" (Spinks, Parnell, Bowden) -- well, the little that I could understand -- and was wondering whether any of these 3 rocks might be an example of this. The spots in my rocks do not seem to have the "dark concretionary cores" that the article says are often present in the spots, but I was curious to know more. I'm having doubts but thought I'd ask. Thanks for any i
  17. Barrelcactusaddict

    Ajkaite (Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm., ~86.8-83.4 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    "Ajkaite" Ajka-Csingervölgy, Ajka District, Hungary Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm. (~86.8-83.4 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 80%, H: 10%, O: 9%, S: 1-2% Refractive Index: 1.541 Specific Gravity: 1.0 Weight of Specimen: 2.4g Dimensions: 18x14x13mm Lighting: Longwave UV (Convoy S2) Ajkaite is a fossil resin with chemical composition markedly different from succinite (i.e., Baltic amber); it also contains low levels of sulfur. Ajkaite is found within layers of fossiliferous marl (numerous fossil shells can be seen in the matrix in the images): the marl is also acco

    © Kaegen Lau

  18. Barrelcactusaddict

    Ajkaite (Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm., ~86.8-83.4 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    "Ajkaite" Ajka-Csingervölgy, Ajka District, Hungary Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm. (~86.8-83.4 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 80%, H: 10%, O: 9%, S: 1-2% Refractive Index: 1.541 Specific Gravity: 1.0 Weight of Specimen: 2.4g Dimensions: 18x14x13mm Lighting: Longwave UV (Convoy S2) Ajkaite is a fossil resin with chemical composition markedly different from succinite (i.e., Baltic amber); it also contains low levels of sulfur. Ajkaite is found within layers of fossiliferous marl (numerous fossil shells can be seen in the matrix in the images): the marl is also accompan

    © Kaegen Lau

  19. Barrelcactusaddict

    Ajkaite (Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm., ~86.8-83.4 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    "Ajkaite" Ajka-Csingervölgy, Ajka District, Hungary Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm. (~86.8-83.4 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 80%, H: 10%, O: 9%, S: 1-2% Refractive Index: 1.541 Specific Gravity: 1.0 Weight of Specimen: 2.4g Dimensions: 18x14x13mm Ajkaite is a fossil resin with chemical composition markedly different from succinite (i.e., Baltic amber); it also contains low levels of sulfur. Ajkaite is found within layers of fossiliferous marl (numerous fossil shells can be seen in the matrix in the images): the marl is also accompanied by layers of coal, sand, sandstone,

    © Kaegen Lau

  20. Barrelcactusaddict

    Ajkaite (Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm., ~86.8-83.4 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    "Ajkaite" Ajka-Csingervölgy, Ajka District, Hungary Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm. (~86.8-83.4 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 80%, H: 10%, O: 9%, S: 1-2% Refractive Index: 1.541 Specific Gravity: 1.0 Weight of Specimen: 2.4g Dimensions: 18x14x13mm Ajkaite is a fossil resin with chemical composition markedly different from succinite (i.e., Baltic amber); it also contains low levels of sulfur. Ajkaite is found within layers of fossiliferous marl (numerous fossil shells can be seen in the matrix in the images): the marl is also accompanied by layers of coal, sand, sandstone,

    © Kaegen Lau

  21. yearsago

    texas fossil, looks like a shell

    just south of Austin TX. They dug this up at the graveyard this past week so i can't actually take it home (just wouldn't be classy). but i still wanted to know what it was. theres only really water fossils in the area so i assume some kind of shell.
  22. yearsago

    Texas, maybe coral?

    south of Austin Texas, halfway up a small mountain, dug from a pit in the ground the one circled in red I'm pretty sure is just sandstone, but i thought I'd check. The other one im curious about. The camera didn't capture it well but its embedded on crystal stone, opaque, yellowish. I've found one before with the same pattern but i lost it. is it a type of coral? I found a different type of coral in the same spot before.
  23. Bringing Fossils to Life

    Mystery Devonian Fish

    I found this mysterious fossil in Richland, Michigan, and don't know what to make of it. It appears to have a fish scale and lots of bone fragments, as well as a piece of coral, in smoothed (Devonian?) sandstone. I don't know my fish very well; can anyone help?
  24. I found this worn piece of Berea Sandstone that seems to have once hosted a bunch of brittle stars on the face. How would you calculate the risk:reward ratio wrt splitting it to see if there are pristine brittle star fossils inside, and if so, what's the best method to expose potential fossils without an air scribe and without jeopardizing the brittle stars that are exposed? It's about an inch thick and has a very, very, very slight hint of a fissure near the face. Sorry for the poor pics.
  25. Philip A Good

    Crustaceans in Sandstone

    This is a fossil of what I think was a small crustacean. It was found in a tributary very close to the Shenandoah River. It is sandstone. The view in 1 is the best example however in 6 there are what appears to be the noses of other specimens sticking out of the matrix. Oddly enough they all seem to be facing in the same direction, perhaps a feeding pattern. I would sure like some help identifying and dating this specimen. I'm sure there are more where this one came from. Thanks in advance, Phil Good--------Northern Va.
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