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  1. ThePhysicist

    Shark teeth (and sawfish)

    From the album: North Sulphur River

    Shark teeth (at least in my experience) are really hard to find at NSR. The best method would probably be to sift for them in gravel, but I've yet to do that. The odd looking one is actually the base of sawfish rostral tooth.
  2. RAlves

    Any thoughts on this one?

    Hello, Trying to identify this fossil found in Portugal, Arrábida region. Could it be from a sawfish (Pristidae)? Thanks for the help.
  3. butchndad

    BigBrook ID help needed

    Good evening. Another morning spent in Big Brook. Did ok with the shark teeth. 3 questions: 1) 15/16th inches I think is a sawfish rostal. 2). 3/8 inch piece of jawbone with 2 teeth which I think is fossil fish but have no idea which, and 3) a 1 1/8 inch piece of bone I guess to be modern. Can you identify the animal? Thank you for sharing your knowledge.
  4. FossilizedJello

    IMG_9835.JPG

    From the album: Huge Big Brook Fossil Collection

    Spearhead, Crow shark teeth, goblin shark teeth, xiphactinus teeth, mososaur, enchodus, arrowhead, pyctnodontis plates, crab claws, ray tooth, sawfish teeth, semi-modern incisor, semi-modern unknown tooth, bone, jaw fragment with enchodus tooth, toe bone, fossil scute
  5. butchndad

    Fish teeth?

    Hello all found at big brook 4 looks like a sawfish tooth 3 maybe also sawfish with no rostrum 1 & 2 I have no idea and hope you can help sorry for the lousy photos
  6. ThePhysicist

    Sawfish vertebra

    From the album: Post Oak Creek

    I erroneously identified this as a shark centrum, however it doesn't have any foramina on the lateral surface, so it must be a sawfish.
  7. ThePhysicist

    sawfish rostral teeth

    From the album: Post Oak Creek

    These are usually found broken - as is for pretty much everything from post oak.
  8. I hit a new spot in Northeast Texas. This area is a mix or cretaceous and pleistocene. The rooted mosasaur tooth and my first croc tooth made my day. Both are super rare for this area. I also found the largest Enchodus jaw I've found since I started hunting four years ago.
  9. JarrodB

    Northeast Texas Hunt!

    Fun hunt yesterday. I found some huge broken sawfish teeth, shark teeth, enchodus jaw and teeth, mosasaur verts, big heart clam which I've never found in the Sulphur river area and a killer petrified wood Gary point. It got hot around 2PM so I got out early.
  10. The Jersey Devil

    Several NJ Cretaceous Non-Shark pathologies

    Hello TFF, I got a couple items from the Late Cretaceous of NJ that seem to be pathological. The first one, an Anomoeodus phaseolus tooth, seems to be very wrinkly and so I deemed it a patho. That is more of a verification as I haven’t seen a pathological one before. The second is an Ischyrhiza mira rostral blade that has a third carina on one of its faces and a slight flattening (flattening better seen in person). This is also a verification as I just didn’t expect to see a patho rostral. The third one is a bit strange. It is definitely a fish tooth. T
  11. Finally managed to get out for a few hours when I visited Florida earlier this month. Walked in to a Peace river tributary where I got to spend a few hours shifting gravel while keeping an eye on the local wildlife. Was interesting how different the finds were when compared to the previous site which was about 25 miles further north. Nothing overly special, but was a pleasant way to spend an afternoon. Found a lot of bone fragments this trip, but no dugong which surprised me after my first experience. There were also fewer shark teeth this time around. Not sure what the big b
  12. I had a fun hike at the North Sulphur River Texas yesterday. I figured it would be picked over but I found a pretty remote spot with my 4x4. The one sawfish tooth I found in a small creek a few days before. Everything else is from yesterday. It was a great day for Cretaceous coprolite (Poo). @GeschWhat The one coprolite is full of fish verts, bones and fins.
  13. A post by @ynot on STH teeth a while back peaked my interest in extant sawfish rostral teeth. The two extant sawfish genera are Pristis and Anoxypristis. There is only a single extant Anoxypristis species, Anoxypristis cuspidata (Knifetooth or Narrow Sawfish). There are 4 extant species of Pristis, Pristis clavata (Dwarf Sawfish), Pristis pectinata (Smalltooth Sawfish), Pristis pristis (Largetooth Sawfish), and Pristis zijsron (Green Sawfish) Last 2016. I borrowed a Pristis pectinata (Smalltooth Sawfish) rostrum from a friend so I could take pictures of it. This rostrum is from a sawfi
  14. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since May 25, 2018.
  15. A post by YNOT @ynot on STH teeth peaked my interest in extant sawfish rostral teeth. The two extant sawfish genera are Pristis and Anoxypristis. There is only a single extant Anoxypristis species, Anoxypristis cuspidata (Knifetooth or Narrow Sawfish). There are 4 extant species of Pristis, Pristis clavata (Dwarf Sawfish), Pristis pectinata (Smalltooth Sawfish), Pristis pristis (Largetooth Sawfish), and Pristis zijsron (Green Sawfish) Last 2016. I borrowed an Anoxypristis cuspidata rostrum from a friend so I could take pictures of it. The rostrum is 18” long and is shown bel
  16. Plantguy

    Sawfish teeth?

    Was going thru another bag of old stuff and found this tooth and was thinking it had different features than the last sawfish tooth I found, maybe its something else. Here's two sets of views of the newer find. It appears to have very tiny serrations and somewhat stockier and is not oval in cross section but appears more tear drop shaped. Is it a sawfish and is it the same as the earlier one I found? Are either of them Pristis or Anoxypristis? Here's a set of 3 views of the one I had found earlier. Sorry for the varying scales and orientations and a
  17. Nico CA

    Sawfish teeth or Reptile teeth?

    I found this teeth in a marine sedimentary sandstone (Cretaceous.Palaeocene) and I don't know what is it.
  18. sixgill pete

    Cretaceous Sawfish

    This little I. mira oral tooth is a very uncommon find. It was found by fine sifting marl from the bottom of the formation. The rostral teeth of these Cretaceous saw sharks (fish) are common and verts are also occasionally found.
  19. sixgill pete

    Sawshark Rostrral Tooth

    A rostral tooth of I. mirs. These are not uncommon, but always a pleasure to find. This one is nicely colored.
  20. brad hinkelman

    big brook nj id please

    I'm assuming worn saw fish? thanks
  21. RandyB

    Ramanessin 2-18-17

    Took advantage of the mid-60's sunny forecast Saturday for a drive down to Ramanessin Brook in NJ. Nothing special, seemed to be mostly fragments and there were lots of footprints along the banks, but it was still enjoyable to be outside enjoying the winter reprieve. Tiny sawfish (Ischyrhiza mira) rostral tooth, front looks good, but back is busted up (scale = quarter inch squares) Tiny ammo fragment (front & back)
  22. brad hinkelman

    todays help from big brook nj

    Well today was nice up in the snow at the brook and even running into frank and shane forum members there..and then another couple as my wife and I were leaving.....among some decent shark teeth always find some other interesting things, I'm assuming that the first pic is a sawfish rostral tooth and with talking to shane and frank at the brook possibly coral on the next pics? anyone with info on it and time period.
  23. LordTrilobite

    Onchopristis tooth

    Tooth of a sawfish.
  24. LordTrilobite

    Onchopristis tooth

    Tooth of a sawfish.
  25. AshHendrick

    GMR Saw Fish Tooth (Ischyrhiza Mira)

    From the album: GMR Finds

    Conservation Status: Extinct Scientific Classification: Family: Sclerorhynchidae Genus: Ischyrhiza Species: Mira Common Name: Saw Fish Fossil Period: Cretaceous Formation: Yorktown (within Greenville, NC) Formation Period: Late Miocene to Early Pliocene. Found: November of 2015 at GMR in Greenville, NC
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