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  1. Here by my new Spinosaurus Aegypticus tooth from Taouz, Morocco. It is 4 1/2 inches. The colors are less common than your regular Moroccon Spinosaurus teeth. It has 0 restoration done to the tooth, and the quality is very high. Which I find special about this one. Noticed some slight patho and serrations on this tooth too? Could someone explain the patho perhaps.
  2. This is kind of an oddly specific question, but out of the four theropod teeth that I have, all of them have the mesial serrations worn down, while the distal are pristine. Is this due to feeding wear? Or environmental factors? Could it possibly be that the mesial serrations are more fragile? Thanks for any answers.
  3. Hello! I apologize for my long absence. I transferred over to UW-Madison back on January, so I’ve been busy with school and life. I have messaged other members in the past about this enigmatic theropod tooth that I had purchased from a friend here on the forums a few years ago. I’ve been told that it is either Dromaeosaurid or Tyrannosaurid, but I’m still unsure. Since I am interested in studying vertebrate paleontology studying the Mesozoic era, a paleontologist at UW-Madison invited me into the lab and we got a decent enough picture of the (rather worn) serrations on this tooth. H
  4. Nanotyrannus35

    Nanotyrannus tooth

    From the album: Nanotyrannus35's Dinosaur Teeth

    About 1 inch long. Gifted to me by @Troodon
  5. Nanotyrannus35

    Theropod tooth fragment with serrations

    I'd gotten this tooth fragment from the lance formation of Weston county, Wyoming, it has some serrations and I think that it might be identifiable. The curvature of the fragment. And with this last one, I'm not sure if I'm doing it right. A photo of the tooth with a millimeter scale to show serration density. (it seems to me that there is around 3 serrations per millimeter) Thanks for any help.
  6. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur distal denticles

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA ~ 3.6 / mm Notice that the enamel is still clear, with the dentine visible underneath. If Nanotyrannus is valid, then this is Nanotyrannus.
  7. Mrtoad

    Shark teeth ID

    Hello, I found these in a bowl of Otodus obliquus teeth in a jersey shore gift shop. I’m assuming they’re from Morocco. The serrations tell me they’re something different but I don’t know what. Any ideas?
  8. PODIGGER

    ID help please

    Recovered the below bone from the Peace River a few weeks ago and put it aside thinking it was a partial bird bone or small reptile. On closer examination I can see serrations running along the length of the two sides. This now has me thinking Ray barb. The specimen is 26mm long by 10mm at the wide joint end. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks.
  9. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaurus rex serrations collage

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    To me, serrations are such a fascinating tool. They were independently evolved many times in many different animals. They concentrate force into smaller points (increasing the pressure = Force/Area) so that the thing being bitten would break or cut along the line of serrations. They also are great for "sawing" through things such as muscle. T. rex definitely made great use of this adaptation. Topmost (greyscale) image from "Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex:" https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249649164_Physical_evidence_of_predatory_behavior_
  10. Been doing some work with a dissecting scope and noticed this serrated barracuda tooth. Tooth is from the Old Church Formation (Oligocene). Is this common for small barracuda teeth?
  11. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaurus Rex tooth fragment (serrations)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Closer view of serrations.
  12. LordTrilobite

    Raptor tooth

    Tooth of a velociraptorine raptor. Specifically the serrations of the tooth are typical of Saurornitholestes.
  13. ThePhysicist

    T-rex tooth fragment

    From the album: Fossil Collection

    Tyrannosaurus rex tooth fragment from the Hell Creek formation.
  14. Happy holidays everyone. I would greatly appreciate help identifying the following specimen. It was collected in the Santa Susana Mountains of Simi Valley, Ventura County, California. It came from the Saugus or Pico Formation. Saugus is late Pleistocene to late Pliocene while Pico is middle Pleistocene to Pliocene. My uncertainty regarding the exact formation arises from the fact that (1) it was float material already weathered out of the formation it came from and (2) based on limited research and knowledge, I believe there has been a lack of consenus regarding differentiation of
  15. Hi! I have a tooth tip from hell creek formation but I dont know if its nano or rex, the serration count fits within the t-rex range with 2 serrations/mm , but I do think its quite slender for a rex tooth. What do you think? I tried my best to get a photo of the serrations but it wasn't very easy. The tooth tip is just 16 mm.
  16. readinghiker

    Psuedocorax

    Hey all, I am once again coming to you, as this board has some incredible people on it with a vast wealth of knowledge. I have a question about the genus Pseudocorax. Do they have serrations, or don't they? Welton and Farrish write that the crowns of P. granti are smooth..."cutting edges smooth and very thin." Yet I see photos on the net of P. affinis that definitely have serrations. Does ones specie of Pseudocorax have serrations while another doesn't? Thank you in advance for any information relating to this! Randy
  17. readinghiker

    Squalicorax

    Hey everyone, I don't have a lot of comparative material at hand, so I am asking for your help. I am working on a large shark fauna from the Cabezon area of New Mexico. The teeth are very beat up, possibly due to wave action on offshore sand bars. However, upon close inspection of the better teeth I have discovered that the serrations on the lingual side of the teeth contain indentations (or possible enable folding...see the photo). I have some squalicorax teeth from the Turonian, about 25 miles from this site, that were described in the New Mexico Museum o
  18. readinghiker

    Asking for more squalicorax help

    I have done some more research on the squalicorax that I posted about a few weeks ago. I ended up examining 886 teeth or fragments thereof. Of these, 79 showed a fossilization process in which the serrations (and sometimes the whole cusp) was covered with a white mineral. 48 were so worn that sometimes the serrations could barely be made out. 254 were too small or fragmented to be of any use (which does not preclude that they were of the same species as the rest). The remaining 632 all had the ornamentation that is so unusual. They can be found only on the labia
  19. Still_human

    Hybodus

    From the album: Sharks and fish

    Hybodus Houtienensis shark spine Permian to Cretaceous shark (impressive!!!!!) beautiful serration teeth down the back.
  20. Arizona Rex

    Tooth with serrations?

    I came across this tooth in a local shop. Could only get two pics but I zoomed in on one to show the cutting edge. The tooth is labeled "carnosaur" and it's close to one inch in length. Not sure if this tooth is dinosaur or crocodile. I came across a previous thread here on the forum with pictures of a similar cutting edge that suggested it may be a mosasaur. Hoping for a possible ID before a possible purchase. Thank you!
  21. HoppeHunting

    Smooth Tiger

    Hey all, This isn't so much a Fossil ID as it is a question. Can Tiger Shark teeth have smooth cutting edges if they're worn down enough? If so, then this tooth would certainly attest to that. I'm fairly certain that it came from the jaws of Physogaleus contortus (technically not a Tiger, but I call it one anyway). The strange thing is that it almost entirely lacks a defining feature of Tiger Shark teeth: serrations! The only evidence of a serrated edge are on the distal shoulder, but even there they are incredibly worn down. On the blade of the crown itself, the cutting edge is pe
  22. The Amateur Collecter

    Possible raptor tooth?

    So.......I've recently gotten into fossil collecting. It's very addicting, I'll admit. Anyway, I recently bought a neat little Kem Kem tooth that was supposedly listed as a "dromaeosaur" or "raptor" tooth. It wasn't too expensive, and of a decent size and quality, so if by chance it wasn't some sort of raptor tooth, I wasn't going to cry about wasting money. I have no idea why, since ignorance is bliss, but I had a sudden urge to look up identifying raptor teeth and stumbled across this impressive site (thank you for existing!!!!). I am now quite certain that my Kem Kem "dromaeosau
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