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  1. ThePhysicist

    Galveston tiger shark

    From the album: Galveston Fossils

    Spotted this one at night - best way to beat the heat during the Summer, but makes hunting much more difficult than it already is in Galveston. Tiger sharks appear to be less common than Carcharhinus; this is from the extant species: Galeocerdo cuvier.
  2. ThePhysicist

    Galveston shark tooth

    From the album: Galveston Fossils

    Razor sharp sandbar shark tooth. Lovely dark blue when it was still wet.
  3. ThePhysicist

    Sandbar shark tooth

    From the album: Galveston Fossils

    After drying out, some teeth can change their color, typically getting a bit lighter.
  4. ThePhysicist

    Galveston shark teeth

    From the album: Galveston Fossils

    Found 3 teeth this weekend trip. Galveston shark teeth are very hard to find (for me). These were all found on the main island (not Bolivar). The top two I believe are the sandbar shark (C. plumbeus) and the lower one is a tiger shark (G. cuvier).
  5. ThePhysicist

    Do you see the shark tooth?

    From the album: Galveston Fossils

    Spotted this one at night - best way to beat the heat during the Summer, but makes hunting much more difficult than it already is in Galveston.
  6. Sarahnm

    Shark tooth ID help!

    Hi there! I am super new to fossils and have been wanting to learn more. Today I found my first ever shark tooth by total accident on the San Lorenzo River in Felton, CA. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify the tooth! One of my students also found a thinner one in the same area yesterday- pretty wild!- and I was wondering if they were both the same species. My best super uneducated guess is some kind of mako shark but really have no idea! some extra details: both of them were sitting on the shore of the river in plain sight- I don’t have a measurement of them right now bu
  7. Thanks for any help putting species IDs on these marine fossils from Magoito Beach, Portugal. My best guesses are as follows: 1-12) Oysters, unsure of species 13-20) Clams, original material and steinkerns. 13, 16 and 19 are quite "tall", others rather flat. 21, 22) ?? Possibly a coral? Or crinoid fragments or a trace fossil? 23, 24) smaller oyster pieces 25) a mussel? 26-29) gastropods 30) shark tooth - possibly goblin shark? Sadly fragmented, but has distinctive pair of lobes at the root midline 31) ?? intriguing paddle-shaped structure with a distinctive mid-line
  8. hokietech96

    Great white

    I hope everyone is doing well. Was on the beach today in NJ and I found what I think is a juvenile great white. I think it is worn because there is no serrations. My question at what point do great whites get serrations? I’m assuming it’s right from the beginning?
  9. David in Japan

    Shark tooth identification

    Hi TFF friends, Last time I went fossil hunting I found this pretty beaten shark tooth on the surface of a rock lying on the beach. Himenoura formation, Late cretaceous, -85MYA Kumamoto japan. The apex is missing but it is none the less an interesting tooth. At first I thought it was my first Squalicorax tooth but when I looked under magnification I was not able to see any serrations and noticed a nutrient groove and a small cusplet here on the left side of the root in the photo below. After extracting completely the t
  10. Found these teeth several days ago on Bolivar Peninsula,TX (Holiday Beach subdivision). My understanding is that shark teeth can be difficult to ID down to exact species, but am curious nonetheless (my guess for the bigger one was bull, other two mako or lemon). Thanks in advance for any expertise!
  11. ThePhysicist

    Ptychodus whipplei

    From the album: Sharks

    An odd shark from the Cretaceous of North Texas - these sharks had crushing teeth suited for hard-bodied prey.
  12. ThePhysicist

    Carcharodon hubbelli

    From the album: Sharks

    White sharks used to have smooth-edged teeth. They eventually evolved serrations as their diets transitioned to marine mammals from fish. This shark was a transitional form between the smooth-edged predecessors and the modern fully-serrated great white. The serrations on this tooth are not worn-down. C. hubbelli serrations are naturally finer, typically decrease in size towards the tip, and are oriented towards the tip. This tooth is from the desert of northern Chile. Fossils from Chile are now illegal to export, so as an ethical collector you need to make sure that any Chilean fos
  13. ThePhysicist

    Great white shark tooth

    From the album: Sharks

    One of the most coveted teeth due to the great white's popularity. Being one of my favorite animals, I knew I had to get a nice one eventually. This one in particular is special. Besides being in superb condition, this tooth has a bite mark on the root: three parallel grooves on the labial side of the root gouged by serrations. Bite marks on teeth are uncommon, and a neat feature on this already sweet tooth. This tooth is from the desert of northern Chile. Fossils from Chile are now illegal to export, so as an ethical collector you need to make sure that any Chilean f
  14. ThePhysicist

    Tiger shark tooth

    From the album: Sharks

    The tiger shark is still around today. Their unique teeth are very good at cutting through tough turtle shell - their favorite prey. Their teeth also happen to work on about anything else that can fit in their mouths.
  15. ThePhysicist

    Cretodus

    From the album: Sharks

    A large genus (for the Cretaceous); this one was found at the DFW airport in the 80's.
  16. Tigereagle12345

    Trip to Westmoreland State Park, VA

    Last weekend I went on a camping trip to Westmoreland State Park in Virginia, somewhere I had fossil hunted previously and found some cool bones like a dolphin vert. This time, I found several bones that I believe might be able to be identified. If anyone can help, it would be much appreciated. Thanks! All of the finds: A piece of whale bone, id'd through size: Rey Teeth: Continued in the next post due to upload issues
  17. Hi there everyone! I acquired this plesiosaur tooth specimen from Oued Zem, Khouribga, Morocco not too long ago and I couldn't help but be fascinated by all of the different fossils found in the single piece of matrix. The front of the specimen contains a beautiful plesiosaur tooth with what I believe is a fish vertebrae and other fish material. On the back, the specimen is riddled with small shark teeth as seen by an exposed root and various exposed crowns. Though I'd greatly appreciate a positive ID on the plesiosaur tooth, I'm really more interested in th
  18. Callahan

    64804D25-5938-4789-9CEF-2D5C3BCD17CA

    From the album: 39 years exploring Texas

    Collection from undisclosed area in tarrant county tx
  19. ThePhysicist

    Cretoxyrhina tooth (3)

    From the album: Sharks

    A gorgeous tooth from one of my favorite sharks! The enamel isn't polished - the chalk preserves its shine extremely well - it's as shiny as when it fell out of the animal's mouth!
  20. ThePhysicist

    Cretoxyrhina tooth (2)

    From the album: Sharks

    A beautiful tooth from one of my favorite sharks. This one is extra special because of the self-inflicted bite mark - a gash seen on the left in lingual view. Apparently their bite was strong enough to cut their own teeth!
  21. ThePhysicist

    Cretoxyrhina tooth

    From the album: Sharks

    One of my favorites - the "ginsu" shark. This one was found at the DFW airport in the 80's.
  22. ThePhysicist

    Isurolamna bajarunasi

    From the album: Sharks

    An Eocene Mackerel shark closely related to the mako and white sharks. It may have evolved from I. inflata.
  23. ThePhysicist

    Cretodus tooth

    From the album: Post Oak Creek

    The "big guy" to find at POC. Though, this one is smaller, the preservation is as good as it gets for this location. In fact, it makes me believe that POC could draw from layers adjacent to the Eagle Ford Group. I've found matrix pieces that are consistent with the geology of EFG, but need to find matrix pieces with this kind of preservation to confirm Atco or something else. I'm also not sure that this is C. crassidens anymore since this smaller, narrower form differs so much from the holotype. I currently believe it's an undescribed species since I haven't found something that ma
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