Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'silurian'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Ever put a foot in your mouth

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. Rock-Guy-17

    Trace Fossil ID from Western New York

    I found a few plates of sandstone that I really liked a few years back in Lockport, NY. I believe they are from the Silurian Grimsby formation. I don't remember nearly anything about trace fossils. My first guess from just googling before making this post was arthrophycus. Can anyone tell me what kind of trace fossil is present in these pieces? 1. 2. 3. 4.
  2. Mainefossils

    Chonetes bastini

    Chonetes bastini was first described from the Leighton Fm, also called the Pembroke Fm. It is differentiated from other species by the number of spines and its finer more numerous striae. Most specimens are missing the hinge spines. The above pictures show the pedicle valve. A poorly preserved original or cast of the shell exterior is in the left side photo. Some of the exterior of the shell may be missing since there is a horizontal groove above the shell where shell may have once filled it. The right photo shows an exterior impression or mold. Williams, Henry Sha
  3. Mainefossils

    Actinopteria bella

    Actinopteria bella is a species of bivalve found in the Leighton/Pembroke Fm, and first described by Henry S. Williams. It is differentiated from A. fornicata by less convexity in its shell and a wider beak. It is differentiated from A. dispar by its shorter shell. The above pictures are of the left valve. A poorly preserved original or cast of the shell exterior is on the left side. Some of the exterior of the shell may be missing since the exterior ribs have less than normal height. The right photo is an exterior impression or mold. Some of the shell may be present on
  4. Mainefossils

    Brachiopod id

    This is another fossil from the Silurian Leighton Fm, Maine. It is an excellently preserved internal and external mold of a brachiopod. It is similar to the Salopina species that I am constantly finding in this formation, but this brachiopod's valve is more strongly curved, instead of almost flat. It also has less numerous striae, and they almost reach the median process. As well as this, the dental plate is thinner and curves inward more strongly, and the ctenophoridium is wider. Any help on its identification would be greatly appreciated. Here are some pictures of it (internal mold on the le
  5. Hello, I'd appreciate your help with this one. I found this one at a Lake Michigan beach in Illinois. Silurian from the Racine formation. I believe it's a sponge or demosponge. Thinking the white dots on the vertical growth are pores, and the admittedly terrible microscopic photo of a small area on top of the rock shows some of its openings. Some of these seem to be filled with minerals that make them look like bumps, many others aren't preserved well at all, just show as faded round dots. Am I way off on this? TIA, Pippa
  6. Nautiloid

    Unidentified tiny fossils

    From the album: Nautiloid’s Eurypterids and other Silurian fossils

    Unidentified fossils that could be ostracods Upper Silurian Bertie Group Fiddlers Green Formation Phelps Member

    © Owen Yonkin 2020

  7. aek

    Snow thaw

    I needed to get out of the house for a few hours and so went to try my luck at finding some local Silurian fossils. First outing of the year. My first best find was this crinoid which I believe is a Eucalyptocrinites crassus calyx. A good size. On the reverse side is a small Encrinurus egani. This next find I was pretty excited about. A large D. platycaudus cephalon. I took it home to prep... Unfortunately, the preservation was not ideal, but that's the way the cookie crumbles. I placed a nicer example next to it
  8. Mainefossils

    Gnathasome fish scales

    Fossil forum, I have just finished uncovering a gnathasome fish scale. It is from the Leighton Fm, Maine. I believe it to be in the genus Gomphoncus, maybe even Gomphoncus sandelenis, which was described as being in the Eastport Formation (https://www.erudit.org/fr/revues/ageo/2018-v54-ageo04224/1055415ar.pdf). I am unsure of this id though, mainly because of the pit in the largest end of the scale. It is approximately 200 microns long by 250 microns wide by 200 microns deep. Any help on the id of the genus, or maybe even the species, would be greatly appreciated. Here are some pictures
  9. Would anyone know if ADAM's SILURIAN collection is still available to view please on TFF.
  10. EscarpmentMary

    Eurypterid

    I was working at my desk today when one of my fossils caught my eye. I picked it up and thought that looks like a Tully Monster, but a quick check on the internet and I realized too small and not my geological time period, the Tullimonstrum belongs in the Pennsylvanian period. 300 million years ago, too young, there you go Illinois US. So I’m thinking a part of Eurypterid, or sea scorpion, they were around during theSilurian. What do you all think?
  11. Mainefossils

    Lingulid brachiopod id

    Fossil forum, This is another specimen from the Leighton Fm. I had two possibilities, Lingula scobina and L. lewisii, which I found mentioned in this paper https://repository.si.edu/bitstream/handle/10088/14399/1/USNMP-45_1985_1913.pdf, and which I further researched. The main problems I have with these two species are that L. scobina has different surface sculpture, and L. lewisii is an English species. Any further guidance or suggestions? Here are some pictures of it (internal mold on the left, external on the right):
  12. Mainefossils

    Unknown fossil

    Fossil forum, I recently found an interesting fossil. I was thinking coral or bryozoan, but was unable to identify it correctly. It is from the Leighton Fm Maine (again), which is Silurian. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Here are some pictures of it:
  13. Mainefossils

    Brachiopod ID

    Fossil Forum, I recently found multiple brachiopods that I believe are in the genus Salopina, moved from Orthis, and of the same species. I found them in the Leighton Fm, Maine, which is Silurian. I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the species was, and also if anyone had any literature on this genus. Here are some pictures of them (internal molds are on the left, external on the right):
  14. oilshale

    Inopinatella sp.

    Literature: Tinn, O. et al. (2009): Thallophytic algal flora from a new Silurian Lagersttte. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 2009, 58, 1, 3842
  15. Tidgy's Dad

    ADAM'S SILURIAN

    Hoooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrraaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Here we are at last, into Adam's Silurian. Thanks for looking. First up is the Lower Silurian or Llandovery and I begin with a problem. I posted this one incorrectly in Adam's Ordovician as it had got it's label muddled up with an Ordovician Favosites I had that has vanished in the move here, but is being replaced by kind forum member @Herb Anyway, this, I remember now I've found the correct label, is from the greenish Browgill Formation, part of the Stockdale Group from a cutting near Skelg
  16. BeforeDinosaurs

    Getting Started In Southeast Wisconsin

    I'm excited to get into fossil collecting, but before I spend money on gear, I'd like to be able to make an informed decision. The fossils I'd be collecting are from the Silurian age Racine Dolomite. I know that Estwing tools are generally considered the best, but other than that, I am completely unsure as to which hammers and chisels would be most appropriate for breaking these apparently very hard rocks, or even how to go about using them. I know a spot on a friend's property (by the Milwaukee River) where there are a bunch of Silurian rocks piled up, so I don't think access will be a huge p
  17. I found these, endocast impressions of dorsal shields of the jawless fish Americaspis americana, in the Silurian of Pennsylvania. There are 2 1/3 dorsal shields shown. A complete shield measures approximately 2.4 x 1.0 inches (6.10 x 2.54 cm).
  18. Ken K

    Meristina maria, HallIMG_9339.jpg

    From the album: The Waldron Shale

    Wonderful specimen of the brachiopod Meristina maria, Hall. Conspicuous in the Waldron, specimens retaining all the shell material an fully inflated are not commonly collected. Specimen measures 1.25" in length.
  19. Ken K

    Calymene brevicepsIMG_4200.jpg

    From the album: The Waldron Shale

  20. From the album: The Waldron Shale

    Featured is a beautiful specimen of Calymene breviceps from the Waldron Shale. Despite this species being a somewhat common trilobite of the Waldron Shale, specimens of this quality are hard to come by. Specimen is 1" on matrix measuring 3.5" x 4.5". Collected and Prepared by Ken Karns.
  21. From the album: The Waldron Shale

    Plate with two specimens of the Crinoid Eucalyptocrinites elrodi (Hall). Plate measures 10" x 7" with crowns measuring approx. 2.5" in length. Specimens of this quality are exceedingly rare in the Waldron. Note the one specimen complete with root system.
  22. aek

    Silurian trilobite

    Any ideas on this partial lichid? Sugar run formation. Measures about a cm. Also on the fence on the other cephalon. Proetid? Thanks for any help.
  23. locutus9

    Silurian Invertebrate Needs ID

    These are two fossils of the same species collected at the Long Pond Road Site along the Erie Canal in Greece, New York. They are from the middle Silurian Rochester shale. These were collected last winter, and I have since been unable to identify them. Both are no greater than 3cm in length. Some interesting fine detail is visible on the first specimen. The American dime is 1.8cm in diameter.
  24. locutus9

    Silurian Fossil Needs ID

    This is a fossil I collected at the Long Pond Road Site along the Erie Canal in Greece, New York. It is from the middle Silurian Rochester shale. Some interesting perpendicular lines can be seen along the edge of it. I have looked for other fossils similar to this one and have found nothing. The American dime is 1.8cm in diameter.
  25. Per Christian

    Ceratiocaris or Slimonia?

    Hi all. I have this specimen i bought fra a dealer in western europe It's from the Lesmahagow in scotland. I bought it as a Slimonia, but was later advised on facebook that it's in fact a ceratiocaris. What do you guys here think? I'm pretty convinced it's a ceratiocaris. What confuses me is that the dealer is quite experienced and he collected it himself decades ago, and got it id'ed by the museum in Edinburgh
×
×
  • Create New...