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  1. Hi, here are some fossils from my collection. All fossils were found in upper jurassic limestone quarries of Southern Germany. BR Martin
  2. DarasFossils

    Solnhofen Jellyfish?

    I just went to a local rock and fossil shop in Montana and they had an amazing selection of fossils for really reasonable prices, so I ended up getting quite a few. They had a lovely Solnhofen rack, mostly filled with fish, insects, and coprolites and some beautiful squid but I saw this questionable creature in the corner for very cheap so I decided it was worth it to purchase. I am guessing it is a jellyfish due to the shape, and I hope it is, but if it is something else, I really did not waste my money. It's around an inch and a half in diameter (4cm.) Just hoping it's not a coprolite lol. A
  3. Howdy! I’ve recently inherited a small amount of money, which I intend to spend on a high quality fossil. Merry Christmas to me! (I’m sure my Mom would approve…) I’ve always wanted a Solnhofen dragonfly. Attached are a couple photos of a specimen of interest, identified as Aeschnogomphus. I’ve requested UV photos if possible of specimen, which is in Europe. I know it’s essentially all real. But is there artistic enhancement? Seller says no repair, but can’t say whether it has been enhanced. It is very, very expensive, a once in a lifetime purchase. Probabl
  4. Goodmorning, last month I went to Solnhofen for my last fossil trip of the year in Germany. I found a lot of fossils (ammonites, coprolites, fish, worms...) and now I'm preparing the specimens. I have basic tools, a Dremel 290, needles, awls. I prepare all of these fossils with succes, but a big coprolite is still covered buy a tiny layer of matrix, that I can't remove with my actual tools. It's possible to effectively remove the matrix left with acid? Tomorrow I will post a photo of the fossil. Thanks.
  5. oilshale

    Amiopsis lepidota (Agassiz, 1833)

    Taxonomy from Fossilworks.org. Etymology: Lepidota (Greek), a form of lepidotós, scaly. Grande & Bemis 1998, p.490: “ Originally described as †Megalurus lepidotus by Agassiz in 1833:146, and listed that way by numerous authors over the next 100 years or so, but †Megalurus Agassiz is a junior homonym--see generic list for †Amiopsis Kner, 1863, above. Also referred to as †Urocles lepidotus by Jordan (1919:567); Lange (1968:32); Lambers (1992:295); and others." Grande & Bemis 1998, p.493: “Emended species diagnosis-†Amiopsis lepidota differs from other species of the genus by the fo
  6. On our famous auction site just popped out some incredibly detailed fossil insects and amphibians. Although there are no info from the seller (who probably got them without being aware of what they are), those are unfortunately not real. The matrix is clearly a limestone from Solnhofen, easily recognisable by the floating crinods (Saccocoma) and by manganese dendrites. There are highly detailed insect on them that have never been found in Solnhofen (including a giant spider). Also the amphibian column is probably a fish spine. There are already some bids on them, but please be aware
  7. rocket

    cfStenophlebia

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    another lovely dragonfly, 4 wings and parts of the body (the body is often not preserved), size is around 7 cm, just in prep (I hope to find more of the body, we will see...)
  8. Mesolimulus walchi in dorsal preservation with (poorly) retained "death trace". Taxonomy from Russel et al. 2021. Russel et al. 2021, p. 6: "Emended diagnosis. Prosoma semi-circular, genal spines without indentations that terminate at a first fifth of thoracetron. Cardiac lobe cone-shaped with crenulated margins and cardiac ridge. Ophthalmic ridges present and do not curve towards lateral prosomal margins. Posterior prosomal rim pronounced and lacks beads along margin. Occipital bands present and pronounced. Thoracetron trapezoidal and has pronounced flange. Lateral margin ridges abs
  9. oilshale

    Magila latimana Muenster 1839

    Taxonomy from Fossilworks.org. The state of preservation of Magila is mostly poor, which becomes understandable when you consider that Magila was a burrowing crustacean living in the ground. Therefore, a more calcified carapace was not necessary. Only the exceptionally wide claws are mostly well preserved. These probably also served for digging. Diagnosis from Garassino & Schweigert 2006, p. 22: “Carapace cylindrical laterally flattened; deep cervical groove strongly directed forward; one or two carinae weak in antennal region; rostrum short and edentate; antennal spine well developed;
  10. I already did some research (well, I looked through the Wikipedia list of fossil fish found in Solnhofen), but the closest thing I could find was Leptolepides, however they dont really look alike... Can anyone tell me, what I have got here? Thank you! Since all of you have been asking about the size, I took a picture with a ruler (alright, I took two)
  11. rocket

    Solnhofenamia

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    a rare and nice 40cm Solnhofenamia, uncommon fish in excellent preservation

    © fossils worldwide

  12. rocket

    Mesobelostonum deperditum

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    insect are not common in this region, they are not easy to be seen and to identify. A rare and hugh one is the water bug Mesobelostonum deperditum, this is around 3 cm

    © fossils worldwide

  13. I bought this piece online and it just looks too good to be true, especially for the price.
  14. rocket

    Aeger spinipes kleiner

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    thats the one I showed before under daylight

    © fossils worldwide

  15. rocket

    Aeger spinipes normal size

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    This is Aeger spinipes in "normal size", around 11 cm. Very often the antennae are not preserved or only in parts

    © fossils worldwide

  16. rocket

    Aeger spinipes large

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    sometimes the best way to prepare Solnhofen-Fossils is to do it under blue light. This works perfect with nearly all crustaceans, vertebrate-fossils and some more. This one is fresh from the prep and needs finshing, huge Aeger spinipes (around 18 cm) from Eichstaett

    © fossils worldwide

  17. rocket

    Aeger spinipes large

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    this is the huge 18 cm Aeger spinipes I showed before as UV-Light-pic. You see..., its easier to prep with blue light

    © fossils worldwide

  18. rocket

    Amiopsis lepidota

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    a rare and beautyful "Besenfisch" Amiopsis lepidota in nearly perfect condition, Solnhofen-Area, around 18 cm, no restaurations, no coloration

    © fossils worldwide

  19. rocket

    comaturella_15

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    the "Floating Crinoidd", Comaturella pinnata GOLDFUSS 1886. In the slab limestones you can find many free-swimming crinoids, Saccocoma pectinata. These are small and cover entire strata. Rare are other crinoids, such as this beautiful comatulid "Comaturella pinnata" with a height of over 13 cm. Comaturella lived suspended in the water column and could actively change direction. Complete specimens are rare

    © fossils worldwide

  20. rocket

    Hydrocraspedota_mayri_pfalzpaint

    From the album: Fossils from the Plattenkalke of the Altmühl Valley

    Fossil jellyfish are rarities. They are soft, consist almost only of water and have no substance that fossilises well. They are very rare in the Plattenkalken, but some have been found over the centuries. Even rarer than jellyfish are medusae. One of these specimens, which is rarer than a pterosaur, is shown here. An almost complete specimen of Hydrocraspedota mayri, about 18 cm in diameter. Found in Pfalzpaint

    © fossils worldwide

  21. Hello everyone, I went to a fossil deposit in Solnhofen, Germany a few years ago. I never got all of my finds IDed however. I would appreciate your help if you have time. Thanks for your intrest, -AnyArthropod
  22. Dendrites are moss- or tree-like pseudofossils on the margins of rock fissures and fossils, usually on the bedding surfaces of platy limestones and sandstones. Mineral-rich water with high concentrations of iron and manganese has penetrated microscopic cavities between limestone layers, and diffusion-limited growth has created these brown iron and black manganese dendrites, which are often mistaken for fossil ferns or fossil moss.. This slab with manganese and iron dendrites comes from the lithographic limestones of Solnhofen.
  23. After my visit last week (http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/86063-my-little-trip-to-solnhofen/) This time I was at the visitor quarry in Solnhofen. It was very hard work and it was too hot but the finds arent too bad Its a pity that I couldnt find a fish but nevertheless I found some interesting things! Two pictures of the quarry: A beautiful 4 cm long Laevaptychus: A cuttlefish remain: with nice details (6 cm long): And my finds of the day: Two teeth Teeth a
  24. To mark the occasion of this new sub forum for museums. I would like you show you some wonderful stuff in Teylers Museum in Haarlem, Netherlands. This is actually the oldest museum in the Netherlands and thus also has some really cool history attached to it and it's specimens. http://www.teylersmuseum.nl/en Besides fossils this museum also holds an art and science collection. The museum is just as beautiful as the specimens in it and a true time capsule. While it is quite a small museum, it's charm is worth the trip alone. Even the cabinets are pretty. It even has a few world firsts, such
  25. oilshale

    Glyphea pseudoscyllarus

    From the album: Invertebrates

    Glyphea pseudoscyllarus Schlotheim, 1822 Upper Jurassic Tithonian (Malm zeta) Solnhofen Germany Length 6 cm / 2 inch
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