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  1. Here are just some of my finds from a day spent in the Graysonites wacoense Zone, Grayson Marl Formation, Washita Group of north Texas (Lower Cenomanian, ~97mya) last Sunday, November 13th. This is my second visit to the site, which is equivalent to and faunally almost identical to the Del Rio micromorph exposures of further south, today only present at a couple sites in the DFW area. Starting off with the first find which happened to be my first complete (sans spines and Aristotle’s lantern of course), and largest Goniophorus scotti (Goniophoridae) urchin:
  2. Mioplosus_Lover24

    Holden Beach Diversity Of Fossils

    Recently got back from a trip on Holden Beach, and just WOW. Words can't describe the uniqueness of being able to find Mosasaur teeth next to Megalodon teeth. The recent Hurricane brought in many new fossils and I had quite good luck. Here are some photos of the trip, I will post a picture showing all of my best finds shortly, but for now enjoy! First, here are some of the Squalicorax pristodontus teeth I collected. These were relatively common.
  3. Year ago two friends of mine found some nice teeth and vertebraes from Squalicorax. As they were found close together - what is very unusual - we decided to write a small paper about it. We came to the solution that the verts and teeth belong to the skull-region of the shark. Finds like this are very rare, not many published till now. Journal was "APH" (www.ap-h.de), founded in Hannover. A nice Paper (now existing 50 Years!), 4 issues a year full of papers about northern germany fossils and more 49-61 (Raquet).pdf
  4. It's been over a month now since @Jared C and I found the Eagle Ford Xiphactinus. In the weeks that followed our discovery I was able to get in touch with the right people at Baylor University where I go to school and start to organize a retrieval project. Unfortunately I haven't been able to make it back to the site since then as all involved will have to wait for the wheels of bureaucracy to turn enough for us to have the proper permission necessary to return. So I was left with a problem: my first visit to the Eagle Ford turned out so well that I wanted nothing more than to go back, but I c
  5. WOW, what a day! Today I had the pleasure of finally meeting @Jared C after over a year of reading his trip reports and admiring all of the incredible finds he's made exploring the Cretaceous formations of Central Texas. We have a lot in common: both of us are pursuing a career in paleontology, are both (almost) the same age, and are both attending universities in-state that are only an hour and a half away from each other. Needless to say, I can't believe it took us this long to finally go on a hunt together. Jared drove up from his new place in College Station this morning to me
  6. Hey everyone! I’m looking to trade various Florida fossils such as Lemon shark, Carcharhinus, Tiger, and Hemipristis Serra teeth, soft shelled turtle shell, sting Ray mouth plates and barbs, etc. for a Ptychodus or a Squalicorax tooth! Feel free to send me a message if you want pictures or have requests!
  7. ThePhysicist

    Cretaceous sharks

    From the album: Sharks

    Just a handful of Cretaceous species, most from North Texas. The sea that bisected North America ~85 million years ago played host to a diverse and burgeoning ecosystem that supported many species of sharks. It was likely due to specialization that allowed these sharks to all live in the same place and time.
  8. Marco90

    Squalicorax pristodontus

    From the album: My collection in progress

    Squalicorax pristodontus Agassiz 1843 Location: Morocco Age: 72-66 Mya (Maastrichtian, Upper Cretaceous) Measurements: 2,5x1,5 cm Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Subphylum: Vertebrata Class: Chondrichthyes Subclass: Elasmobranchi Superorder: Selachimorpha Order: Lamniformes Family: Anacoracidae
  9. ThePhysicist

    Crow shark positions

    From the album: Post Oak Creek

    Reconstructed tooth set from a "Crow" shark - Squalicorax (could be S. falcatus) - illustrating the variety of tooth positions. Anterior teeth have erect, triangular cusps. Lateral teeth and posteriors are more common and have an increasingly posteriorly slanted crown, resembling the teeth of modern tiger sharks.
  10. EPIKLULSXDDDDD

    Squalicorax

    From the album: Favorites

    Shark. Squalicorax from NSR, Ozan Formation. 12/19/21
  11. Thomas1982

    Squalicorax

    From the album: Cretaceous of Delaware and New Jersey

    Squalicorax Big Brook, New Jersey
  12. Hello forum members! With the new Coronavirus raging across the world, I thought it would be nice to start some kind of advent calendar, using my own Squalicorax collection. Everyday I will post one or multiple Squalicorax teeth from one location. Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak. I will start with the oldest tooth from the Albian substage and end with the teeth from the uppermost substage; the Maastrichtian. The first one is the oldest and also one of the smallest teeth in my collection. Unfortunately it is so sma
  13. Hello! I have a question. The Squalicorax species, kaupi and basanii: Are they the same species? For example: I got a Squalicorax from Morocco. With the label Squalicorax kaupi but I have seen the same shark teeth being named Squalicorax basanii. Is it kaupi or basanii? Here is a photo of a "Squalicorax kaupi" (not mine) but similar : Regards Adriano
  14. Darbi

    Squalicorax sp.

    Recently I purchased these two Squalicorax sp. tooths from an auction website and both are currently on the way. I have a few questions about identification since I know very little about shark tooths and also please correct any misidentifications. Seller A sold me this tooth and it was listed as Squalicorax hartwelli. It is collected from Niobrara formation in western Kansas. Is Squalicorax hartwelli considered a variation of Squalicorax falcatus? Do you agree with seller A's identification above? Seller B sold me this tooth and it was li
  15. Captcrunch227

    COVID Containment Collecting

    After spending a great deal of time in the house lately do to COVID and days and days of rain, I took the family on a nice leisurely walk to our favorite hunting spot on this beautiful North Texas day. While the kids wwere off collecting some beautiful Turitellas and oysters, I had only one thing on the mind, shark teeth. Cretalamna seems to dominate this site, however some large Cretodus semiplicatus have been found. A Ptychodus latissimus and 2 Plesiosaur teeth have also been found at the site, filling us with hope on each trip for an incredible find. The trip was a p
  16. Hello, I'm looking at this shark tooth for sale, which is listed as Squalicorax bassani from the Phosphate beds of Morocco (scale in cm). I quite trust the seller and as far as I can tell it looks to be the correct species based on a cursory search. However since I am a complete rookie to teeth and have never bought any before, I wanted to ask for a confirmation on the species, and ask how is the quality? Is it good/medium/bad? The other S. bassani teeth I see don't usually have this reddish brown coloration, rather they are ivory/black and shiny, com
  17. Jonathan Raymond

    My shark teeth collection

    Here is my shark teeth collection. photo 1 Species: Carcharocles megalodon Age: 2,6-15 million years (Miocene-Pliocene) Size: 9,5 centimeters Localisation: Georgia River (Georgia) Formation: Hawthorn photo 2 Species : Isurus hastalis Age: 9 million years (Miocene) Size: 4,8 centimeters Localisation: Copiapo, Chile Formation: Bahia Inglesa photo 3 Species: Squalicorax pristodontus Age: 70 million years (Upper Cretaceous) Size: 2,9 centimeters Localisation: Morocco Formation: Kem Kem B
  18. steviefossils

    Pathology or normal?

    Hi all, I found this pristodontus tooth at Big Brook. Of all the Squalicorax teeth I've collected and seen, I haven't seen any with ridges on its lingual or labial sides. Would anyone be able to share if this is a normal feature or pathology? Thanks.
  19. I made a trip to a Navarro County creek yesterday morning. This is the same creek I visited a few weeks ago, but I was a little bit further downstream yesterday. It was still a Wolfe City formation area. It ended up being one of those days where I spent more time hiking and exploring than I should have. I was looking for likely outcrops in this creek, and just didn't find any. I eventually started checking the unlikely looking ones closely, but never did find any fossils that way. I finally spent some time crawling gravel bars, and found a few things there. I'm still a relative newbie at this,
  20. I live near the western edge of Henderson County in Texas. It's a fairly flat area with few outcrops of any kind exposed, and even when they are, they aren't very fossiliferous. The county just west of me is Navarro County, and it does actually have some formations that hold fossils. But I haven't had much luck finding anything in Navarro County. I keep looking, since it's so close. I did a long hike down a Navarro County creek yesterday. For most of the day, it looked like another of those trips where I just don't find anything. But one thing I've learned about fossil hunting is that even aft
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