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  1. Mochaccino

    Is this a T. rex tooth?

    Hello, Wondering if this is T.rex? Or Nano? It measures 1.25 inches and is said to be from the Hell Creek Fm. of South Dakota, no county unfortunately. The base doesn't seem 100% complete but from what is there I don't think is has the expected "pinch" of a Nano. Thoughts? Thanks.
  2. Tidgy's Dad

    T. rex's Arms.

    https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20221025-why-did-t-rex-have-such-puny-arms
  3. Hello everyone! Here I have a juvenile T. rex anterior dentary tooth that I would like to trade for a different theropod tooth. I am particularly after allosaurus (with or without matrix), ceratosaurus, dakotaraptor, baryonyx, or other theropod teeth as well I am willing to consider. Thanks so much for looking and have a good one! EDIT: I also wanted to add that I may be inclined to trade this one for a larger rex tooth of less quality (am open to possible resto/ repair work) > Size: 1.2 inch > No repairs, No restoration > Location: Powder Ri
  4. ThePhysicist

    Worn T. rex tooth (annotated)

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Not the prettiest tooth, but I very much enjoy fossils like this that demonstrate behavior and tell a story. T. rex and other Tyrannosaurs were unusual among theropods in that they consumed the entire carcass of an animal - bones and all. Most theropod dinosaurs have ziphodont teeth, thin and knife-like, good for cutting muscle from bone. The thick and robust teeth of adult Tyrannosaurs, coupled with their incredible bite force, allowed them to shatter and pulverize bone - even those of the large, formidable herbivores they hunted. Despite the robustness of their teeth, Tyrannosaur
  5. ThePhysicist

    Worn T. rex tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Not the prettiest tooth, but I very much enjoy fossils like this that demonstrate behavior and tell a story. T. rex and other Tyrannosaurs were unusual among theropods in that they consumed the entire carcass of an animal - bones and all. Most theropod dinosaurs have ziphodont teeth, thin and knife-like, good for cutting muscle from bone. The thick and robust teeth of adult Tyrannosaurs, coupled with their incredible bite force, allowed them to shatter and pulverize bone - even those of the large, formidable herbivores they hunted. Despite the robustness of their teeth, Tyrannosaur
  6. I know I've been aware of a few papers published several years indicating that T. rex wasn't just a classic scavenger but also an active hunter when it came to preying on herbivorous dinosaurs, and we all know that humans will get food poisoning if they eat raw meat. However, what enzymes did Tyrannosaurus rex have to help it consume the meat of dead individuals of herbivorous dinosaurs like Edmontosaurus annectens and Triceratops?
  7. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    A young T. rex tooth. The preservation of the enamel is fantastic, and I like the dark hues. The serrations are also in great shape. There is some minor feeding wear on the tip.
  8. ThePhysicist

    T. rex tooth chunk

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    For most collectors, it's more affordable to have a piece of a T. rex tooth if you just want it represented. This one is clearly T. rex: it's theropod with serrations (this one has the basalmost portion of the mesial carina), very thick, and clearly would've had a large circumference. Note also the large angle made by the curvature of the tooth at the carina (not Nanotyrannus which have narrow, blade-like teeth).
  9. While watching Eyewitness Virtual Reality Dinosaur Hunter, I learned that the T. rex specimen found by Kathy Wankel in Montana in 1988 had its neck stretched out in rigor mortis when it died. However, does anyone know of any other known dinosaur specimens that are known to have had their necks stretched out in rigor mortis after death?
  10. I am a university student studying T. rex, so of course, I ran into the Nanotyrannus debate. People have been arguing about Nanotyrannus being valid, but there's a huge problem: No adult specimen. Unless someone has an adult, or even a subadult, specimen of Nanotyrannus (over 15 years old), it isn't a real genus. This is why I am here. I know people collect fossils and post pics of them on here, so I'm willing to see what people may, or may not, have. My question is: Does anybody have an adult Nanotyrannus specimen? In simpler terms, does anybody have a Nanotyrannus fe
  11. I read somewhere in a paper by Jack Horner, that G-Rex was said to be around 16 years old when it died using bone histology. In the same paper it said that it was shown by LAG intervals that G-Rex would've continued to grow for 2-3 more years had it not died. This means that the infamous G-Rex was a sub-adult. Jack Horner's Paper: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.515.6451&rep=rep1&type=pdf This got me curious on how big exactly was G-Rex? What was its height, length, and weight? I tried googling the answers for these but to not avail as p
  12. A new "T-Rex" tooth just showed up on our favorite site. It is not a Tyrannosaurus rex tooth however but a more common and far cheaper Carch tooth. We know this because of its more blade-like morphology, its slender profile, its shape, its smaller denticles and the sand on the base I already notice multiple bids on it and I have no doubt the price would escalate as many hopeful collectors would try their hands on getting a cheap T-Rex tooth for themselves. For anyone looking to buy a true T. rex tooth, there are several factors to take note of: 1) Thi
  13. heZZ

    Nice tooth?

    Is this a good tooth or does it have any restoration, something wrong abou it? Hell Creek Formation, Jordan, Montana.
  14. Hi All I am open to trading my following theropod teeth. I have attached a couple of images of each teeth along with info on the size and locality etc. Please PM me for more info and images/offers if interested. EDIT - I am after other theropod teeth in return Paul
  15. Hello everyone! Since I live close to the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, D.C., I thought I would go through and give you all a tour of the new fossil hall specimens. Due to the size of the museum, I decided to only focus on the dinosaur fossils. If anyone would like, in the future I can go back to get some pictures of the mammalian and invertebrate fossils as well. Also, due to file size, this will take a little while to add everything in (additional comments) despite the fact I have substantially reduced/cropped all the images. Thanks, hope you enjoy! ........................
  16. PrehistoricWonders

    Large Dino bone

    Hi, I bought this bone unprepared a few weeks ago and was wondering if anyone had any idea of what type of bone it is and what it came from?(it was identified as a T-Rex gastralia by the seller)
  17. Hi I decided to make this since the new Tyrannosaur from Alberta’s Foremost Formation, Thanatotheristes deerootorum has just been named and described. Enjoy!! Tyrannosaur bearing Formations in Canada: Formations in Alberta but most of the Formations on my list are I Alberta anyway. Horseshoe Canyon Formation 74-68 million years ago, Alberta: Albertosaurus sarcophagus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. but no compelling evidence so far. Oldman Formation 78.2-77 million years ago, Alberta: Daspletosaurus torosus, Gorgosaurus sp. Foremost
  18. New Studies Of elastin, collagen, actin in T Rex soft tissues reported. They were even able to raise antibodies to the proteins! https://m.phys.org/news/2019-11-mechanisms-soft-tissue-protein-tyrannosaurus.html
  19. Scylla

    T.Rex Skull News

    Cool story bro... https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49595680
  20. Dracarys

    T Rex tooth?

    I am obtaining this tooth that was collected in 1980s and found originally in S Dakota and is 3 1/2 inches. The person only identified it as dinosaur tooth. Here are the pictures. It looks like Trex right? Thanks in advance.
  21. Dracarys

    Nano vs T. rex?

    I have two similar sized teeth that were both from Hell Creek. One is a large nano tooth (left) but the other may be T. rex? The one on the right certainly is fatter. Thoughts? Thanks
  22. mattman10

    Tyrannosaur Vertebra?

    Just looking for a little help identifying a hell creek vertebra. The individual I purchased it from said it was likely a Tyrannosaur cervical vertebra (probably rex rather than a nano vertebra due to its size). Based on its shape and the fact it's very light, I'm fairly confident their identification is correct. Any help would be much appreciated
  23. After the Velociraptor skull, I finally finished another very long project: the baby T. rex skull designed by Inhuman Species, a 3D printed museum quality fossil replica of a 2-3 years old Tyrannosaurus rex. I really love this project and I made a video of the making from the 3D printing to the painting - I hope you like it. If you're wondering, I 3D printed the skull with the Alfawise U30 in PLA plastic; please watch the video and turn on subtitles to learn more about the tools and the making processes. If your're addicted or interested in 3D printing, you
  24. ZackV

    T. rex or nanno

    I found this tooth for sale listed as Nannotyrannus Tyrannosaurus. I was looking at the tooth and it seemed to have a pretty thick and oval base, but the base also looked like it was a little pinched in like a lot of Nanotyrannus teeth. I thought these pictures would be the best to figure it out, but there are more as well. Thanks for any help in advance, I’ve been looking for a T. Rex tooth for a while, and I want to make sure if I buy one it’s the real deal.
  25. New York Times story about T Rex https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/04/science/tyrannosaurus-rex-dinosaurs.html
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