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  1. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Roughly 200g of small (≈1g) nodules and runs of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China; the mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  2. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Palm-sized piece roughly 80g in weight. There is a very thin layer of coal on the top and bottom of the piece, making it a good example of a seam-type formation. It's blue coloration is purely surface fluorescence, initiated in this case by a 140 lumen LED light; this fluorescence (especially under a non-LW UV light) is caused by the presence of an exceptionally high concentration of various hydrocarbons contained within the amber.

    © Kaegen Lau

  3. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Palm-sized piece roughly 80g in weight, from the previous entry. Transmitted light through the deepest portion of the piece displays the amber's deep red coloration.

    © Kaegen Lau

  4. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Palm-sized piece roughly 80g in weight, from the 2 previous entries. This photo better displays the surface fluorescence of the specimen.

    © Kaegen Lau

  5. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    9.2g amber from Tiger Mountain, King County, WA. This amber is middle to late Eocene in age (about 41.3-33.9 Ma), and comes from coal seams along the boundary of the upper Tukwila/lower Renton Formations.

    © Kaegen Lau

  6. Skeetersaurus

    Shark tooth bonanza

    I know this is a late post but I had a trip for fossils a few weeks back and wanted to share the finds. Love it when I get something nice for the case!
  7. Skeetersaurus

    Shark Tooth Hunt, 19 Feb

    Hey guys, went on a fossil hunt this weekend and found a nice variety of teeth. Weather was great for a change and the water was perfect. I was only able to get in about 2 hours but here's the goods. Can't wait to go back!
  8. Hello all, I collect shark teeth (like so many of you =). My question: are there any collectors that have Dutch Megalodon teeth/fragments and/or Belgium/German O. megalodon? Pictures of your fossils/fossil teeth are very welcome! Kind regards, Fossilsforever
  9. Barrelcactusaddict

    Canadian Amber (Allenby Fm., 52.5-48 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    3.0g of amber, from the same lot in the two associated entries. This mid to late-Ypresian material comes from an old site near the abandoned mining town of Blakeburn, which site and its gangue piles are now technically owned by a coal mining company (although the existing legal claim of the individual who collected this amber is being overruled by the company). The amber is found primarily in association with Metasequoia sp. remains/imprints, however Pinus and Pseudolarix (among others) remains are also found in a lesser quantity at the site.

    © Kaegen Lau

  10. Barrelcactusaddict

    Dominican Amber (La Toca Fm., 20.43-13.65 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Opposing view of same specimen from associated image, weighing 10.0g and measuring (mm) 40x31x20; note the rough, unaltered (i.e., unbroken, natural) exterior of the specimen. Most dominican amber is transparent to translucent, yet this specimen is more akin in appearance to the "butterscotch" variety of Baltic amber; I have not determined if the turbidity is due to microscopic air bubbles, or organic inclusions, though it is most likely the former. This type of dominican amber is sometimes seen as a thin layer/flow overlying transparent material, but this specimen is mostly whole, and it's un

    © Kaegen Lau

  11. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small, partially broken nodule of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .8g and measuring (mm) 15x11x10. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  12. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9; the oblique view better displays the slightly oxidized surface of the largest flow in the piece. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographi

    © Kaegen Lau

  13. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9; note the several flow lines of successive runs. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from

    © Kaegen Lau

  14. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  15. Barrelcactusaddict

    Dominican Amber (La Toca Fm., 20.43-13.65 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Small run of amber from the La Cumbre Mine, weighing 2.4g, and measuring (mm) 37x13x8. It consists of numerous successive flows, and contains several small single-phase bubbles; as this specimen does, several others I have (from the same 2kg lot) from this locality also display an interesting "schiller" effect when adjusted in-hand (light reflects off of the flow lines' surface). Biological inclusions are a possibility with this specimen, though I will need to prepare it to confirm this.

    © Kaegen Lau

  16. Barrelcactusaddict

    Dominican Amber (La Toca Fm., 20.43-13.65 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Small run of amber from the La Cumbre Mine, weighing 2.4g, and measuring (mm) 37x13x8. It consists of numerous successive flows, and contains several small single-phase bubbles; biological inclusions are possible, though I will need to prepare the piece to confirm this.

    © Kaegen Lau

  17. Barrelcactusaddict

    Dominican Amber (La Toca Fm., 20.43-13.65 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Dominican amber from the La Cumbre Mine, from the Cordillera Septentrional. Most pieces range from 5-10g in weight, with at least one containing a large two-phase inclusion (enhydro). Material from this mine frequently presents exterior crusts/aggregates of pyrite (iron sulfide); these were likely formed in a reducing, marine/lacustrine environment, where marine sediments, organic detritus, volcanic material (i.e., ash), and sulfate-reducing bacteria helped to provide the sulfides and iron needed.

    © Kaegen Lau

  18. Barrelcactusaddict

    Dominican Amber (La Toca Fm., 20.43-13.65 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A rare and very unusual specimen, weighing 10.0g and measuring (mm) 40x31x20. Most dominican amber is transparent to translucent, yet this specimen is more akin in appearance to the "butterscotch" variety of Baltic amber; I have not determined if the turbidity is due to microscopic air bubbles, or organic inclusions, though it is most likely the former. This type of dominican amber is sometimes seen as a thin layer/flow overlying transparent material, but this specimen is mostly whole, and it's unaltered exterior does not indicate to its having overlain any previous flows. I uncovered this pie

    © Kaegen Lau

  19. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    1.2 gram amber from Tiger Mountain, King County, WA. Smaller inclusions consist mostly of slightly darker, congealed resin positioned along natural flow lines; this feature is by far most commonly seen among the Indonesian ambers. The few large, dark masses are botanical debris. Image taken under approx. 10x magnification with a Belomo Triplet loupe. This amber is middle to late Eocene in age (about 41.3-33.9 Ma), and comes from coal seams along the boundary between the upper Tukwila/lower Renton Formations.

    © Kaegen Lau

  20. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Two exceptionally fluorescent pieces of amber from Tiger Mountain, King County, WA. These were illuminated with a 140 lumen LED penlight, not a long wave UV light; this is a surprising feature for amber of this locality, as blue amber is only well-documented to come from the Dominican Republic, Indonesia, and Chiapas. This amber is middle to late Eocene in age (about 41.3-33.9 Ma), and comes from coal seams along the boundary of the upper Tukwila/lower Renton Formations.

    © Kaegen Lau

  21. Barrelcactusaddict

    Rovno Amber (Mezhigorje Fm., 33.9-28.1 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Two pieces, roughly weighing 7 and 4 grams respectively. Both are mined from the Rivne region of Ukraine's Rivne Oblast, and had a little to no oxidized layer, in comparison to amber mined from the nearby (roughly 50 km) Klesiv Deposit.

    © Kaegen Lau

  22. Barrelcactusaddict

    Rovno Amber (Mezhigorje Fm., 33.9-28.1 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Roughly 12g specimen of amber mined from the Klesiv Deposit of the Rivne region in the Rivne Oblast of Ukraine. It was originally coated in a 2mm red oxidized crust, typical of this locality. It is believed that the presence of this crust is an indicator that amber from this particular locality underwent little to no re-deposition throughout its diagenesis, and oddly contains the majority of described insect-included Rovno material.

    © Kaegen Lau

  23. Barrelcactusaddict

    Rovno Amber (Mezhigorje Fm., 33.9-28.1 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    19.0g specimen of hand-polished amber from the Rivne region of Ukraine. It contains numerous botanical debris, although I have not observed any definitive insect inclusions. It is what would be termed a "run"; this specimen has over 12 successive layers that would have run down the side of the tree (the depicted piece would be properly-oriented if rotated 90˚).

    © Kaegen Lau

  24. Barrelcactusaddict

    Canadian Amber (Allenby Fm., 52.5-48 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Closeup of material from previous entry.

    © Kaegen Lau

  25. Barrelcactusaddict

    Canadian Amber (Allenby Fm., 52.5-48 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Rough amber from an old site near Coalmont, British Columbia. The original site is now closed to collecting, since a mining company somehow got a court injunction and has "jumped" the owner's legal, active long-standing claim. The claim owner has informed me that he is not able to collect larger specimens (>3g fraction), as he had been able to in the past.

    © Kaegen Lau

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