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  1. TheDinosaurKing

    Theropod Id Needed!

    Hello All I haven't the foggiest idea what species this tooth i saw on an online site is. @Troodon can you or someone else id this tooth for me? All I know is it Is 1 1/2 " long i don't have a location for this nice carnivore tooth. Thanks in Advance!
  2. Hervé15

    theropod bone to identify

    Hello Sorry, I'm rewriting this message in English. Considering the effectiveness of the responses to yesterday's post, I am submitting another one to you. Also found in the continental interlayer of the Kem kem plateau in Morocco. Bone density seems to be attributable more to a dinosaur than to a crocodilian ... A bone in a joint (carpus?). Does the shape of this bone inspire anyone? Thank you in advance for your answers.
  3. Here is a lovely isolated theropod tooth from USA - the seller lacked all locality data, although he believed it may have been from the Morrisons formation. This lovely tooth is just over 2.5cm long and has 15 serrations per 5mm on the distal side (DC) however serrations on the mid-centre off the medial side have not been preserved. It would be lovely to ID this to some level other than theropod if possible. Serrations on the mesial side only go down 2/3rds of the tooth. There is some restoration to the tooth - if any more photos would be beneficial please let me kno
  4. Just bought these little beauties. Were sold as 'dromaeosauridae sp.' finger bones. Ad also named them deltadromeus. Now, I'm aware of the difficulties with ID'ing Kem Kem theropod but I like buying cheap-ish fossils and then trying to figure out what they really are. Part of the fun I guess. Total length of both bones is ~63mm. Not sure if the arrangement is correct, bones seem to fit well. They're small, which makes me wonder if they're theropod at all. Did look into deltadromeus, found the gualicho shinyae which might be the best reference point it seems. Bones do look like some of the
  5. Hi everyone, I have a theropod teeth that I need help identifying. This tooth first came from a reseller from Morocco in 2019 (before Talsint teeth flooded the market). He promises this came from a Boulmane digger, and calls it a Jurassic tooth. Irregardless of whether this is a Jurassic tooth or not, the reseller is reliable when it comes to locality I have tried identifying this tooth but all my best guess is that it's a Megalosauridae indet. Here are its info: CH: 26.1 mm CBL: 13.7 mm CBW: 8 mm Distal denticle count: 13/5mm on
  6. FF7_Yuffie

    Another abingdon "theropod" vert

    Hi, anyone able to help with this? It's sold as Theropod, from Abingdon. 10.5 x 8 x5 cm. Unfortunately it's very weathered and has been squashed and distorted during fossilization, so it seems difficult to ID. Personally, I think it's been misidentified. At 5 cm, it seems much too thin. Secondly, I'm looking at some drawings of theropod and megalosaur verts and they seem to bend inwards a lot in the middle (not sure of the actual term for it) with large centrums and going narrow in the middle. But if someone else can take a second look, just to con
  7. FF7_Yuffie

    Theropod Vert, UK

    Hi. A second vert I like. From Abingdon, theropod. 6 x 5.9 x 5. Many thanks for the help
  8. CBchiefski

    Advanced Dinosaur Egg Guide

    The Advanced Dinosaur Egg Guide Please share this with those who have egg questions. When possible, technical terms were avoided or defined. Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, but it is always important to do your own research. This guide is merely a snapshot of information taken from many scientific publications. I am not an expert on eggs, rather I just love sharing what little I have learned over the years, what science has learned over the years. For an overview on how to spot a fossilized dinosaur egg and the sizes of eggs, see the basic guide:
  9. BellamyBlake

    Niger Theropod

    I have here a theropod tooth from I-n-Abanghaghit, Niger. It was labeled as Rugops. However, I was suspicious after obtaining it. I consulted with someone who deals in Niger material, who noted that this locality is Jurassic and thus it could not be Rugops. I read Troodon's thread on identifying Niger theropods. Per that guide and other sources, it seems that the only option would be Afrovenator based on that locality (I think I-n-Abanghaghit is synonymous with Agadez but not completely sure on that). This tooth is 0.85" long. Distal serrations count is 10.2 / 5 mm. Me
  10. Hi All, I'm new to this forum and thought I'd send over images of my theropod teeth plus one extremely impressive sauropod from Madagascar. Hope you like them! Paul
  11. PaleoNoel

    Another Lance fm. Tooth

    This past summer's trip to Wyoming provided no shortage of interesting and bizarre finds. This tooth was found at a channel deposit in the Lance fm. and is about 5 mm in length and 2 mm in width. It appears to be a theropod tooth based on the overall morphology, but lacks serrations unlike the all the non avian theropods in the formation. I'm not sure if the serrations were worn off or were never there in the first place. Or perhaps based on the small size it belonged to a young individual with developing teeth. The theropod it most closely resembles in my opinion is Richardoestesia, as it's o
  12. I have here a Spinosaurus tooth, 4" in length. It has the repair close to the base. I'd love to know if anyone can spot restorations. I don't see any. Thank you, Bellamy
  13. Hi all, I had posted about this tooth years ago and the conclusion back then was that its preservation was too poor for any proper ID. I am hoping that with new information we can at least determine if this is a crocodile or theropod. I discovered today that this tooth preserved some serrations First up, this tooth was acquired from a source with many Mongolian material. He called this an Alioramus tooth but I am not comfortable calling it that yet Secondly, a museum curator (who has handled Mongolian material) examined this tooth in person. He concluded this tooth was
  14. BellamyBlake

    Torvosaurus

    I have here a theropod tooth tip from the Morrison Formation of Moffat County, Colorado. It's 1/2". The claim is that it's Torvosaurus based on the serrations. Is that a definitive way to identify this as Torvosaurus as opposed to another theropod? @Troodon Thank you, Bellamy
  15. Alex Eve

    Weird vertebrae

    I found these two vertebrae together in the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta. I’m wondering what they might be? I’m suspecting rather Champsosaur, turtle, or juvenile theropod. Any insight into the identity of these two elements would be great, thanks! @Troodon
  16. Hola a todos. He estado viendo publicaciones durante mucho tiempo con dientes de nanotyrannus. Lo que me gustaría saber es si usted, que tiene más experiencia en la recolección de fósiles, podría identificarlos como pertenecientes a ese dinosaurio o no. De antemano muchas gracias. (Translated: Hello everyone. I've been looking at posts for a long time with nanotyrannus teeth. What I would like to know is whether you, who have more experience in collecting fossils, could identify them as belonging to that dinosaur or not. Beforehand thank you very much.)
  17. I have here Carcharodontosaurus teeth from two sellers. No restorations are declared. However, I'm suspicious of both and would appreciate more opinions on them. Here's the first one, I believe the tip is restored. It's 3.78"
  18. TheItalianPaleo

    Theropod/ornitischian Toe Bone (?)

    Hi everyone, Notice: im italian, so understand my errors So this is a dinosaur bone that, after one year of studying it, i never understand the species or the family of it. I buy it in Italy like two years ago, and in the old Times i was sure it cames from a Theropod Vertebrae from Morocco, Kem Kem Beds (like the seller said). After 5 months of studying, i have contacted Cristiano Dal Sasso ( the one who have discovered the first dinosaur of Italy and other ones) and he said that i it was probably a toe bone from an ornitischian one. After s
  19. PaleoNoel

    Hell Creek Bird Bone?

    Another small Hell Creek bone found in North Dakota, this time it appears to be a the end of a limb from what I believe may be a bird, small non-avian theropod or perhaps even pterosaur. It has very thin walls which is what made me think that way and I would appreciate any input from my fellow members. The bone is about 1 cm in length and 6 mm at it's widest point at the bulbous base.
  20. PaleoNoel

    Hell Creek Small Digit

    I found this tiny, slender bone at a Hell Creek microsite during my trip to the Dakotas in 2019 with PaleoProspectors. I'm not sure what it came from, but I'm hoping it's theropod, avian or otherwise. It's missing a section of the outer layer of bone and I believe the interior is hollow & filled in with the ironstone common in the formation. The dimensions are 1.7 cm in length and about 3 mm in width. I would appreciate any feedback you may have. In situ shot from the site: The closeup shots did not come out exactly how I wanted them lighting and detail wise. If you would l
  21. Isolated theropod Teeth from the Kem Kem Basin continue to be a mystery. Plan on documenting all the different morphologies I have in my collection to see the variation that exists. Currently we cannot identify any one to a specific species or genus possibly family. I can provide discussion and aid in identification at some point. Just a note, different morphologies do not necessarily mean different species. There are lots of tooth variations in the dentition of a theropod, why its so difficult to nail down an ID even in the best of circumstances. Morph Type 1 A
  22. PaleoNoel

    Tiny Lance fm. Theropod Tooth

    Hi everyone, tonight I want to share with you one of my favorite finds from the summer, this absolutely tiny theropod tooth I found looking through anthill matrix in Wyoming's Lance formation. It's currently the smallest theropod tooth in my collection and it's always an interesting contrast when compared to my largest personally found tooth (a Tyrannosaurid from Judith River). It's about 3 mm in length and a bit over 1.5 mm in width. I believe the serrations have been worn off as they are incredibly faint in some areas and absent in others. I'm not sure if the way the light gleans off t
  23. Hi TFF, I am a Dromaeosauridae enthusiast and have been collecting online for a little while now. I want to thank the members here for getting me educated on so many aspects of fossil teeth identification. I want to share my small collection in the hopes this is helpful for some of you in the future. Your critical input is highly appreciated, as always! #1 First up, one of my treasures, a robust Deinonychus antirrhopus tooth from the Cloverly Fm. A big thanks to @StevenJD for letting go of this one – much appreciated! Note the asymmetry in the placement of the carinae
  24. Hi everyone! As I have mentioned several times, being a 3D artist I am trying to move into the field of paleoart. Recently I have started modeling Ceratosaurus nasicornis in 3D, and I really want to make it as accurate and plausible as possible. Here is what I have got so far: a basic model done in 3ds Max. After this I am planning to take it to ZBrush and add more muscle definition, sking wrinkles, scales and other fine details. At this stage this is just the base and I would like to share it with you guys in order to receive some feedback from those who know their dinosaur anatomy. Did
  25. So, this theropod tooth came in a lot of a bunch of other teeth I bought as part of a box lot of about 20 Kem Kem theropod teeth. Most of it was in pretty bad condition, and there wasn't really provenance attached to them, but I paid literally pocket change for them. But to get back on point, I wasn't sure if this was an Abelisauridae, or a Carcharodontosaurus, possibly an indeterminate theropod. My gut feeling is that it's an Abelisauridae, but I'm not sure, Abelisaurid teeth tend to be much more easily recognizable, and I have a lingering doubt on this one. Measurements are in centimeters. A
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