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Found 70 results

  1. Dinosaur Tracks

    Thought I would share some of my Acrocanthosaurus tracks in my collection from Texas. These are from the Glen Rose Formation. Anyone who has dino tracks, please feel free to post them here on this thread too...would love to see them! The associated pair are big...both over 20 inches long.
  2. Tear Drop shaped trace fossil

    Hello, first post, so apologies in advance for any unintended transgressions. I found this one in Big Brook, New Jersey among the plethora of trace fossils usually attributed to shrimp, that are usually disregarded by most hunters here. (I personally find them kind of interesting, and have a lot of fun when I bring them home and tell my wife they are "witch's fingers.") Usually the tube is more rounded and longer and yes, "finger-like." This one is tear shaped and flat on one side. I have seen similar shaped fossils online attributed to insects. There is also an old post here of a similar fossil thought to be the work of a clam. I am just wondering if anyone has another opinion before I slap a label on it and put it back with the other witch's fingers...I mean shrimp burrows. (Sorry not a very exciting first post.) I'm also wondering if there is a more definite classification. I've heard they might be something called a ghost shrimp, which also sounds rather spooky. OK I see missed some info here and sorry for the lack of metric measurements I sometimes forget how primitive we are here (and then I watch the news and it all comes rushing back.) Item is approximately 7.5 CM. Big Brook is a stream located in Colt's Neck Township, Middlesex County, NJ. It's a hot spot for Shark's teeth, mosasaur teeth and an occasional cephalopod part. This was pulled from the river bed itself.
  3. Hi everyone, it's been a while since I've posted something to have ID'd so I thought I would take a few pictures of the oddities in my collection and post them on here. I'd like to know people's opinions on this piece of bone I found in the Hell Creek formation of North Dakota which looks like it may have holes in it made by bone boring invertebrates. Here they are!
  4. Fossil nematode trace in gastropod?

    Good morning again! I found this 1.5cm gastropod yesterday over lunch in soft gray "mudstone". Haven't cleaned it or identified it yet, but the most interesting aspect is a mineralized, lined, trace fossil or actual mineralized remains of some sort of fossilized nematode. It is at the 12:00 position in the photo. The "trace" is covered by matrix to the left. Bear with me on this one Since it is in the plane of the inner shell and mineralized, I surmise the gastropod died, and as in modern world, nematodes take advantage and migrate through the tissues, eating/absorbing the detritus, but some "event" killed the nematode, or over time mineralized its "track" along the interface of the shell and the tissue. Make sense? Regardless, its really cool!!. There's another tracing in it but difficult to get any pics. Thoughts as always appreciated!!! Bone
  5. Sauropod skin cast?

    This piece was found Today in Colorado at the old marsh quarry is this a possible sauropod skin cast?
  6. Trace fossils? Coral? Anemone? Worms?!?

    Hey there! This is my first post on The Fossil Forum. I don't have a lot of knowledge about fossils, but I sure do know how to find them. Hopefully these aren't too obvious and boring, but I'm incredibly curious anyway. I found these near Sheep Bridge north of Phoenix, Arizona. Here the Verde river has cut through deep layers of ancient lava, sandstone, mudstone, etc. I was exploring for crystals up on a steep hill along the river's canyon walls when I came across a whole lot of these things. They are very fragile and I didn't want to break apart some of the 2-3 foot wide boulders of them so as to preserve them for others to find. Anyway, my understanding is that this area was once a sea floor, so I'm assuming they are some type of coral, anemone or something similar. The fossils are composed mostly of the same sediment which encases them, so I suppose they must be trace fossils, but please correct me if I am wrong. Other not-so-filled-in ones even had crystals and other minerals lining the cavity. As well, I looked at a geological map of Arizona and the area I was exploring is composed of the following... Late to Middle Miocene Basaltic Rocks (8-16 Ma): Mostly dark, mesa-forming basalt deposited as lava flows. Pliocene to Middle Miocene Deposits (2-16 Ma): Moderately to strongly consolidated conglomerate and sandstone deposited in basins during and after late Tertiary faulting. Includes lesser amounts of mudstone, siltstone, limestone, and gypsum. There are a couple photos of some ball shaped objects which were very easy to knock apart from the surrounding stone. I have no idea what those could be. The rest of the photos are of the coral looking objects. Some of them, if still intact, were nearly 24 inches long, but I left those behind and only took smaller samples. Please note how the "head" of the corals appears to flare out and is larger than the rest of the stem. Finally, some of them appear to have a little node sticking out of the "head," but I suspect that may be due to weathering as these are very fragile fossils. Thank you all so much for your interest and help and I look forward to learning more!
  7. CYLINDRICHNUS CONCENTRICUS TOOTS IN HOWARD, 1966(TRACE FOS SIL) IN ITS TYPE LOCALITY, UPPER CRETACEOUS, WYOMING Allan A. EKDALE & Sherie C. HARDING Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae (2015), vol. 85: 427–432. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14241/asgp.2015.018 asgpichnolspecissueekdalefestschri85_3_507_514 (2).pdf
  8. Bone, tube, or plant?

    I found these at an Oriskany Sandstone exposure in Blair County Pennsylvania that is normally overgrown. There was abundant crinoid & shell material around. There is no internal structure, and the larger specimen seems to show some faint longitudinal striations. ID suggestions appreciated ad. I was thinking Mud tube, filled burrow, cephalopod /shell cast, or plant bits. I couldn't find any similar pictures in my resources.
  9. Some type of trace fossil?

    Can someone tell me if this is some sort of trace fossil? I find them often in the clay in a creek bed that contains fossils of the upper Cretaceous period. Thank you!
  10. Hello everyone, I am in desperate need of help with a huge debate I have been having with a friend over fossils preserved in ironstone concretions. From some of what I had read to some advice from other members I it possible to find vertebrate bone among shells and other mollusks preserved in an ironstone concretion. Whether it leaves a trace of the organism, morphs the organic material into the structure of the iron concretion through the decomposition with preserving, or whatever else it may be it seems to be possible. So recently I have hunted a place known to have recorded marine cretaceous shell and other mollusk found in ironstone concretion as well as cretaceous plants in shale, it seems like not to vast of enough study has been done there only from what I know, but since no vertebrate material had yet been discovered there though there can maybe be the possibility. I found these two particularly distinct pieces in iron concretions that exactly mimic the scute structure of soft shell turtle and croc in my opinion, I know how iron concretions are famous for leaving psuedofossils and such but these two pieces look way to exact and since its possible for shells and mollusks to preserve why not scutes? So I am here looking to end this debate, I'm looking for your opinion, can these be labeled as fossils, traces, etc? Or are these among some of the world's best iron concretions and nothing more. Your input especially if you are very experience in this subject would be tremendously appreciated.
  11. I went to a construction site near a big lake (Dian lake 滇池) at Kunming, China (Although this city is famous for Cambrian fossil) This place is going to construct some apartments. A lot of workers pass by without realizing they are trace fossil. it's geological map is: from https://www.osgeo.cn/map/m02db the location is around: from IOS's map So it suppose be from Quaternary, right? (but I am not sure if lake trace fossil can produce trace fossil like below) And I found some trace fossil: and some other stuff i am not so sure: and last picture is ripple mark If it is from the lake, that would be a nice vacation place in summer!
  12. This rock was found in the shallow water off the South East shore of Lake Michigan about 20 years ago. No idea what it could be. Any help would be appreciated.
  13. A few Ordovician unknowns

    Here are a few fossils I recently collected from the Maquoketa Group (Upper Ordovician) in northern Illinois that I'm not sure about. 1) Maybe some kind of trace fossil? 2) The two things in question here are to the left and right of the pentagonal crinoid columnal. The small fossil on the left looks like it might be part of a trilobite genal spine? And the three-pointed fossil to the bottom right I have no idea about. I feel like I've seen something similar before but can't remember.
  14. pseudo fossil, starfish

    While walking back to the car I walked over this interesting specimen. I do not know if it is a pseudo fossil most likely, feeding trace of a star fish with lots of arms most unlikely. This comes from the toolebuc formation in central Queensland and is cretaceous. The item in question is 60 mm across. Any comments appreciated. Mike
  15. Here In Washington State! I purchased an estate with a 1925 Argentina Body & Trace fossil collection from a 1924-25 Meteor expedition, the collection has been sealed since 1935 and I am just now archiving the items with photos and as much information as I have. Although I was told all of the items were collected in the same area as the meteor, the specimens span over Millions of years (Billions if going by the estimated 4.5 Billion year old Meteorite) Ammonites at 409-66Ma to Ground Cherries at 52 Ma with the fruit fossilized and a few with showings of the husk at the tops. There are over 400 pieces so I've got a lot of work to do. I look forward to your comments as well as needed help with some of the loose items that are not easily ID (I know there are other species of fruits, nuts pictured below, this is what is next for me to archive)
  16. If any one can or would answer a question for me. I am just curious if these trace fossils are of any value?. I will be honest this is something precious to me and my younger brother that found it. It's going to be in our family for many generations to come. This is special and priceless for many reading. The first being we found it on our family property that's been our family for generation. It was located at the very creek our 15 siblings and us have played in and spent all of our Sumner day's in since we was bigg enough to sit in water. This is a special place for our family. My father played their as a child. My grandfather's and his father played there as well. So I can't explain how much that piece of stone, rock what ever else it is means to us. If any one could help i would appreciate greatly. I am not asking for any figure or any thing of that nature. I just want to know if has value aside from the value we god for it.
  17. Deep-water trace fossils

    Hello friends! Today I'm seeking your help to identify a few fossils that I've found over the years. They are trace fossils and I collected them in northern Italy, along a creek. They were not in their original setting, but nearby outcrops dated to the Cretaceous or the beginning of the Caenozoic. These deposits were formed by the action of turbidity currents, in deep waters. If you have any idea for the ID, they are more than welcome! Thank you!
  18. These tracks were made by a foot-long worm on a "death march" 550 million years ago. Newsweek, Sept. 4, 2019 (has pictures ) https://www.newsweek.com/ancient-worm-tracks-evolution-life-1457624 Barras, C., 2019. Ancient worm fossil rolls back origins of animal life. Nature, 573(7772), p.15. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02556-x https://www.nature.com/magazine-assets/d41586-019-02556-x/d41586-019-02556-x.pdf Chen, Z., Zhou, C., Yuan, X. and Xiao, S., 2019. Death march of a segmented and trilobate bilaterian elucidates early animal evolution. Nature, pp.1-4. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1522-7 Yours, Paul H.
  19. Just wanted to share the newest addition to my collection. An anchisauripus dinosaur track fossil, collected legally in Massachusetts.
  20. Help Me Out

    After a little research I think this is coprolite. Rock on one side and something that resembles poop on the other side. See next post for reverse side. Size is 1 1/4 inch by 3/4 inch by 1/4 inch
  21. Is this rock considered a fossil

    So is this rock considered a trace fossil or a fossil at all? I am asking because I have seen similar rocks identified as fossils. Thanks.
  22. Strange Steinkern

    This is a steinkern of a fossil clam that I had purchased, the shell itself fell apart almost immediately and this was left. I just want to confirm that the things on the surface of it are some kinds of trace burrows from worms, I am not really sure but that is what they look like to me. Thank you all.
  23. Track traces?

    Found this slab at Jalama Beach, California on Saturday. It was quite different from all other blank pieces we found. Monterey Shale Formation, Miocene. Some of these prints look like bird tracks to me. Any insights?
  24. Kilkee Ireland

    Looking for help identifying what I believe are trace fossil found on the cliffs in Kilkee Ireland. The area is Upper Carboniferous if I am reading the map correctly. Any help would be appreciated.
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