Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'trace fossils'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Ever put a foot in your mouth

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. First of all I want to make it clear that I know what are trace fossils an I know the difference between fossils and trace fossils, but I feel like I am missing something. In a few posts here on the forum I saw people saying things like "this is not a fossil, maybe a trace fossil" and things like this and I do understand that regular fossils give more information but can anyone please explain to me why it seems like trace fossils are worthless compared to regular fossils?
  2. Newly discovered fossil named after U of A paleontologist By Andrew Lyle, Univeristy of Alberta Research News, January 26, 2021 https://www.ualberta.ca/folio/2021/01/newly-discovered-fossil-named-after-u-of-a-paleontologist.html https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-01/uoa-ndf012621.php https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210127093217.htm The paper is: M. Ryan King, Andrew D. La Croix, Terry A. Gates, Paul B. Anderson, Lindsay E. Zanno. Glossifungites gingrasi n. isp., a probable subaqueous insect domicile from the Cretac
  3. Bradley Flynn

    Upper Devonian trace fossil ID

    Hi all So I took some pictures of some very interesting trace fossils. They are found in the upper Devonian, frasnian, Witteberg group, Swartruggens formation. Is it possible to get an identification on these?
  4. Found this piece on a walk near a Triassic outcrop in Pennsylvania, has a pretty exact visual similiarity to the wing rib of a Triassic reptile but is likely just some form of sedimentary trace. It would be great to get some more opinions on this piece to see if its worth holding onto or I would label it to be definitely sedimentary and rid of it, which I feel is the case.
  5. Took me a little while to post this trip report, I'm always a busy person. This trip is from October 3rd, 2020 in Ellsworth County, Kansas at a reservoir. The predominant formation at the site I visited is Kiowa formation; which is known for marsh and delta environments in the early Cretaceous (Albian). I found some interesting things and I'll show below. Possibly some carbonized wood materials. Lignite or coal? It was flaky and would crumble if touched. It left some black powders on my hands after handling it. I found several large pieces of them together and partly encased in con
  6. Finally ... a short trek on the open prairie of Eastern Colorado and into a slice of the Cretaceous period. This was my first true jaunt since my move from the East coast and it was a welcome change to my normal routine. My journey really began several years ago when I purchased some shark teeth from a fossil forum member in Colorado. He regularly visits a site on private land in Eastern Colorado that contains (what we think) are exposures of the Fox Hills fm. , and are chock full of marine fossils from that time period. I contacted him several weeks after I arrived, desperate to
  7. Oxygen levels also important in biodiversity of trace fossils. https://phys.org/news/2020-08-ancient-life-story-early-diversity.html
  8. I took a walk along Etobicoke Creek on the weekend and found some of the usual suspects!
  9. I have found scattered limestone clasts with submillimeter holes in them. I pick them up wondering if they are stromatoporoids, bryozoans, sponges or the like. The holes do not extend into the interior of the rock. Some of the rocks have lichen and algae growing on them. I finally found a soft dark lichen or algae growing in the holes in the rocks. Let me know if anyone can tell whether the dark spots are lichen or algae. If they are the cause then the rock exhibits bioerosian. Bioerosian was first described by Conrad Neumann in 1966 as “the removal of consolidated mineral o
  10. Went to Joshua Creek near Mississauga and got bitten by Mosquitoes! This creek yields its treasures very reluctantly. I looked at hundreds of rocks and brought back only six. One is an 'X' shaped burrow. Another has a bunch of wavy ridges through several layers which I presume are either geological or maybe fossil algae that is new to me. Also got a few 'bumpy' bryozoans, which I have taken to calling 'Parvohallopora' until I can figure out what they really are in Georgian Bay formation. Much of the area was packed with trace fossils...intensely detailed, but boring and
  11. Hi all, Once again we are back from a weekend of fossil sleuthing in south eastern Arizona south of Tucson. The Upper middle cambrian Abrigo formation is mostly limestones, but the lowermost member is either a dark grey shale, or green glauconitic micaceous shale. Gorgeous stuff! Three main localities were visited - the 80/90 Roadcut (mostly trilobits and brachs), Ajax Hill near Tombstone (trilobits), and and area near Colossal Cave just south of Tucson. (tons of trace fossils). Trace fossils are very abundant in both the Abrigo Formation and the slightly older Bright Angel Sh
  12. Fossil footprints found in Sydney suburb are from the earliest swimming tetrapods in Australia by Phil Bell, University of New England https://phys.org/news/2020-05-fossil-footprints-sydney-suburb-earliest.html Roy M. Farman et al. Australia's earliest tetrapod swimming traces from the Hawkesbury Sandstone (Middle Triassic) of the Sydney Basin, Journal of Paleontology (2020). DOI: 10.1017/jpa.2020.22 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-paleontology/article/australias-earliest-tetrapod-swimming-traces-from-the-hawkesbury-sandston
  13. Bonehunter

    Trace fossils or water residue?

    So- been starting to look for my first conodonts in black shale in the Kansas City area and I commonly see what appears to be mineral deposits left when water seeps through layers, then dries, but these are in winterset limestone (as best I can tell) and while they look similar, maybe these are trace fossils? thanks for taking a look! Bone
  14. BenWorrell

    Devonian Burrows? Fish Poo?

    ID help please! I recently found these strange features in a Devonian rock in Johnson County, Iowa. They are unusual looking enough that I suspect an animal may have been involved in their formation. My first guess was that they were burrows that had filled in with dense crinoid and shell debris, but I'm not sure how that would happen. My second guess was that it could be poop/coprolite from a fish or some other Devonian creature. I didn't have a scale with me, but these would be very large for fish poop. I will post another photo in a separate post below (files are too big). I wou
  15. Rexofspades

    Trace Fossils from Miocene Potomac

    Hi, longtime lurker first time poster here. I was wondering if you guys can help me ID this concretion my family found years ago near Calvert. I believe it might be a trace fossil of some kind, possibly a burrow or tunnel. I have found similar types at Westmoreland State Park. I can upload pictures from different angles if needed. Any suggestions of what it could be?
  16. Had a great day getting out this weekend and exploring some cretaceous clay outcroppings along the creek bed. Lots off impressions of shells but other interesting things that I don't recognize. Are they anything other than erosion patterns? I have more photos if needed. Thank you! ay ge I think the top is some type of shell but what about underneath?
  17. Hello everyone, I am in desperate need of help with a huge debate I have been having with a friend over fossils preserved in ironstone concretions. From some of what I had read to some advice from other members I it possible to find vertebrate bone among shells and other mollusks preserved in an ironstone concretion. Whether it leaves a trace of the organism, morphs the organic material into the structure of the iron concretion through the decomposition with preserving, or whatever else it may be it seems to be possible. So recently I have hunted a place known to have recorded mar
  18. Malik

    Jurassic Trace Fossils

    Here's some pictures of Trace fossils from early Jurassic of Western Himalaya. I'm curious if anyone knows what the proper name should be if not "Thalassinoides". Thanks in advance
  19. Dear all, It was difficult, very difficult to wait with posting, since I am very, very excited about this fossil find. However, I also wanted the Dutch magazine version to come out first. Well, it finally did this Tuesday, so here is some info in English, along with a couple of the figures. During a visit to the Piesberg near Osnabrück (Germany) in 2010, I found a stem fragment of Calamites decorated with strange, elongate-oval structures [Fig. 1]. While those features were unusual and quite remarkable, it proved difficult to find information about them and the fossil consequently went into
  20. Several months ago a speaker at a Dallas Paleontological Society general meeting gave a talk that included information about research into the remains of urine spatters left by large herbivorous dinosaurs which had been recently identified. I don't remember who it was, when it was or even the general topic of the talk but I would like to know what the scientific name is for these trace fossils if anyone knows.
  21. Kasia

    Givetian fossils from Poland

    Hello, I have found these during my recent trip to Wymysłów and Śniadka, two locations in Poland with middle Devonian fossils of the Świętomarz Beds. The ones from Wymysłów seem to be some kind of trace fossils:
  22. Italo40

    Deep-water trace fossils

    Hello friends! Today I'm seeking your help to identify a few fossils that I've found over the years. They are trace fossils and I collected them in northern Italy, along a creek. They were not in their original setting, but nearby outcrops dated to the Cretaceous or the beginning of the Caenozoic. These deposits were formed by the action of turbidity currents, in deep waters. If you have any idea for the ID, they are more than welcome! Thank you!
  23. Sun was in abad position unfortunately but I’m curious if you think these are just random marks or something else? The top picture marks are about 8” total. The bottom two with the sets of four are about six inches square per set, on a huge boulder. As always, value your input!
  24. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2215291-540-million-year-old-worm-was-first-segmented-animal-that-could-move/?utm_campaign=RSS|NSNS&utm_source=NSNS&utm_medium=RSS&utm_content=news https://www.courthousenews.com/scientists-uncover-550-million-year-old-fossils-of-bug-trails/
  25. I made a trip today to Albion Falls in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada by public transportation. Albion Falls is a classical waterfall that cascades over the Niagara Escarpment in Hamilton, Ontario and is 19 metres high. The waters flow north along the Redhill Valley as Redhill Creek to empty to Lake Ontario. Once a popular tourist destination, climbing up the waterfall is not allowed anymore due to paramedics having to rescue irresponsible tourists who have hurt and died from slipping and falling. I mostly ended up checking out the Grimsby Formation which is nicely exposed near the waterfall.
×
×
  • Create New...