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Found 418 results

  1. From the album fish

    Bobasatrania mahavavica Triassic Ambilobe Madagascar
  2. Hi. They were found in Muschelkalk facies of Ladinian. Bony remains of nothosaurs and placodontos appear in the area. In a book they appear classified as placodontos teeth, but I would like to specify more. Thank you.
  3. New Triassic Dino from Brazil

    A very well preserved herrerasaurid dinosaur, Gnathovorax cabreirai is described in the attached paper. For us collectors it gives us clues around Carnian age teeth. Unfortunately most of the teeth available to collectors are Norian or earlier in age. https://peerj.com/articles/7963/ Unfortunately the paper does not do a great job describing the teeth, here is what we have: "All tooth crowns are blade like, caudally curved and labiolingually compressed. The premaxillay and dentary teeth lack serrations in their mesial margins. However, in the distal margin there are small serrations that form a right angle with the main axis of the tooth. In the maxillary teeth the serration occur in both margins."
  4. Staurikosaurus

    Staurikosaurus tooth. Measuring 3/8 inch. San Miguel, New Mexico. Triassic .
  5. Keichousaurus hui

    Here is an interesting vertebrate with a very long neck. It meaaures 6.5 inches 16.3 cm around curve. The Keichousaurus Hui from Guanglin, Guizhou Province, China. The formation is the Huixia beds and is preserved on a one inch thick limestone plate with no cracks.
  6. A number of collectors are very interested in Triassic Dinosaur tooth material, however, lots of misinformation exists, partially because little is known and dealers want to sell product. My knowledge is very limited so I tried to put together an assemblage of current information that has been published so that we can all become better versed on this topic. I'm not saying its complete but its the best I can do with my limited knowledge. Most technical papers on this subject are outdated, difficult to read for a novice and not complete enough. Fortunately a recent, legible paper was published in 2015 by Heckert & Lucas that has helped me. I've tried to extract the pertinent information, associated with teeth, since that what most collectors are interested in. First let me get on my sandbox and say that we should NOT assume that what is being sold is accurately described regardless who is selling it or how much you like a dealer. Very little is known and even less is described. If a seller insists what he has identified is accurate, have him show you the technical documents that supports his diagnosis. There are a number of theropods and archosaurs in these assemblages that have serrated teeth so identification is difficult. Triassic dealers similar to those in the Kem Kem which label everthing Spinosaurus like to label everything Coelophysis. Just be cautious..its your money. Almost all the teeth you see sold come from New Mexico so I will focus in that region. A Map of New Mexico with the Triassic outcrops shown below as well as the associated Counties. The numbers correlate to the stratigraphic formations shown below in Figure 4. Figure 4 The Zuni Mountains in West-Central NM are from the lower Chinle Group (Bluewater Creek Fm) and contain Tetrapod fossils amphibians and phytosaurs and aetosaurs. Dinosaurs are possible but nothing is diagnostic. Faunal List of the lower Chinle Group Zuni Mountains Northern/West Central New Mexico has yielded some of the most interesting Vertebrate Fossils most associated with Coelophysis at Ghost Ranch. Included in this group are the Petrified Forest and Rock Point Formation of the western counties. Chindesaurus bryansmalli, Tawa hallae and Daemonosaurus chauliodus are considered valid a dinosaurs in the Petrified Forest Fm. Coelophysis bauri is valid from the Rock Point Formation. Faunal List of the Petrified Forest and Rock Point Formation - Key on this list is Coelophysis bauri in the Rock Point Fm Northeasten New Mexico (Bull Canyon and Redonda Formations). Heckerts 2015 paper comments that dinosaur fossils remains are rare in the Bull Canyon Formation. The coelophysoid Gojirasaurus quayi has been described but its taxonomic placement is uncertain. Herrerasauridae tooth fragments have been found but nothing has been assigned to a taxon. Heckerts & Lucas 2015 Paper on Triassic Vertebrate Paleontology in New Mexico https://libres.uncg.edu/ir/asu/f/Heckert_Andrew_triassic.pdf Bull Canyon Formation 2001 Paper on Vertebrate Fauna https://nmgs.nmt.edu/publications/guidebooks/downloads/52/52_p0123_p0151.pdf Latest placement ( Hans-Dieter Sues et al 2011 ) Identifying Coelophysis bauri Teeth - There is lots of variation their teeth and I will show a few types. The Museum of Northern Arizona publication Coelophysis describes the teeth as follows: All the teeth are recurved Premaxillary teeth: rounded cross-section, smaller teeth are ribbed but smooth on larger ones. None show serrations. Maxillary Teeth: the first tooth is recurved with no serrations, second tooth has serrations only on the posterior carina. All the other maxillary teeth have serrations on both edges. Some of the teeth the serrations may be limited to the upper part of the anterior (mesial) edge. Dentary Teeth: the first seven teeth lack serrations, eight tooth serrations only on the posterior edge. Subsequent teeth have serrations on both edges. The first four teeth are elliptical (rounded) in cross-section being compressed after that. Anterior teeth may contain ridges. Serrations are very fine 8 to 9 per millimeter on the posterior (distal) edge. (other publications say 7/mm) Distal Carina Denticles Premaxillary, Maxillary and Dentary teeth shown - Dentary tooth Maxillary Tooth Anterior Denticles Posterior Maxillary Tooth Paper on Coelophsis Teeth by Currie and Buckley Coelophisis.pdf Additional images of the teeth with no supporting info Good overall paper on C. bauri but does nothing to increase our knowledge on how to describe its teeth https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292525024_The_paleobiology_of_Coelophysis_bauri_Cope_from_the_Upper_Triassic_Apachean_Whitaker_quarry_New_Mexico_with_detailed_analysis_of_a_single_quarry_block Other Theropods Gojirasaurus quayi : one tooth was described with the holotype however it was found isolated and cannot be positively assigned to this species. (Added a few pages below) Chindesaurus bryansmalli : not aware of any skeletal material Daemonosaurus chauliodus The paper does not get into detail on the teeth. See below http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royprsb/278/1723/3459.full.pdf Tawa hallae : http://www.thefossilforum.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=503864
  7. L.S., Thought it would be fun to share this "chance encounter" I had at a mineral show. The photograph below shows a slab of petrified wood from the Triassic of the Isalo II Fm. of Madagascar. When material from this locality is offered for sale (which happens often and in large quantities), it is usually labelled as "Araucarioxylon" or simply as "petrified wood" (where the latter may actually be better). While most of the wood indeed has an "Araucaria-like" anatomy (see Rössler et al. 2014 for a recent discussion on the nomenclature), I recently was lucky enough to "find" something else. While the left-most photograph may not directly show it, the anatomy of this particular slab is quite different from the common Araucaria-like specimens. I tried to clarify the anatomy by contouring the main structures seen, which hopefully makes visible how this wood consists of multiple rings of perimedular bundles and wedge-shaped structures, showing both centripetal and centrifugal xylem (inward and outward growing regions, per as provisionally indicated by the blue and red arrows). This curious growth form (by modern wood standards, at least) is characteristic for the stems of some groups of Mesozoic seed ferns, such as those from the Umkomasiales order. The best-known genus with this type of anatomy is probably Rhexoxylon (see Archangelsky and Brett 1961), but there are more similar genera, making it difficult to arrive at a more specific identification.
  8. Barely a month had gone by since my last trip to New Mexico and Colorado, but I already had plans for this trip in the works. Primary focus this time, which was a solo trip, was fossil collecting, visiting well known sites that have been on my radar for quite some time. I flew out to Salt Lake City and drove directly to Kemmerer, WY. My first stop there was Fossil Butte National Monument: Here is a view of the visitors center (free admission) and the surrounding barren, but awesome landscape that surrounds it:
  9. Fossil Coral?

    This is said to be a Triassic fossil coral from Guizhou, China. Any idea if it is a fossil coral and what species it probably is? Thanks.
  10. Hi all! I've been active in the field for a bit but I've been MIA for a while, dealing with personal life. BUT I have come back online. Have some adventures I have yet to post. So if you're curious about the geology of that part of the world from the eyes of this Canadian hobbit, swing by my blog. Don't be shy and subscribe if you want to keep updated. I'll try to add some of the blog info in this forum too so that I can reach as many folks as possible so they can see the amazing stuff in my backyard. Blog URL: https://redleafz.blogspot.com Thanks!! - Keenan p.s. Little preview:
  11. Exploring the dinosaur graveyards of the Eastern Cape A chance discovery by a local shepherd has lead to a major scientific research program involving palaeontologists from South Africa, the UK and the US in the Karoo Basin. The area is proving to be one of the richest localities for vertebrate fossils in South Africa. by David Paul Ford, Oct 03, 2019 https://natureecoevocommunity.nature.com/users/317374-david-paul-ford/posts/54340-exploring-the-dinosaur-graveyards-of-the-eastern-cape Yours, Paul H.
  12. back from the future:end-Permian events

    VAIMCLOUH End-Permian (252 Mya) deforestation, wildfires and flooding—An ancient biotic crisis with lessons for the present Vivi Vajda,, StephenMcLoughlin, Chris Mays, Tracy D.Frank, Christopher R.Fielding, AllenTevyaw, Veiko Lehsten, Malcolm Bocking, Robert S.Nicoll Earth and Planetary Science Letters 529(2020)115875 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! NB: 7,3 Mb editorial note: Having some pre-existing knowledge of organic petrology,palynology,geochemistry would be helpful
  13. Cylindrical fluted object

    Looks like a fossil branch perhaps. About three inches long. Ends appear to be porous. Pretty much looks like a small log. I
  14. Part 1 Scientific Integrity in Education; Part 2: “The Great Dying” – end Permian extinction John Geissman, University of Texas at Dallas Geologists of Jackson Hole https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nYTuDP54ZI Yours, Paul H.
  15. Bull Canyon Formation

    Here are some of my Bull Canyon Formation fossils from New Mexico.
  16. More tracks

    Found more tracks! Been digging out and flipping these big chunks of rock since all the tracks are on the underside. I stand corrected on my loose amateur term dinosaurs - archosaurs is the correct term.
  17. New footprints from today

    Just found these today. Two different slabs about 4 feet long. Some closeups of one of them.
  18. Rooted Hybodus minor UK

    From the album Odd and Rare Shark Teeth

    Upper Triassic Hybodus minor from Gloucestershire, UK. Westbury Formation. Very difficult to find hybodontids with roots still in tact.
  19. Rooted Hybodus minor UK

    From the album Odd and Rare Shark Teeth

    Upper Triassic Hybodus minor from Gloucestershire, UK. Westbury Formation. Very difficult to find hybodontids with roots still in tact.
  20. Resin transfer method Keichousaurus

    Just a question regarding the resin transfer method. I’m looking at a Keichousaurus fossil that I am considering purchasing. While the fossil looks good the seller has stated that the matrix was very unstable and he utilized the resin transfer method to stabilize the matrix. How effective is this method? The matrix looks very thin to me and any inquiries have gone unanswered. I do not have any photos of this specimen but I can direct anyone interested via pm to the very popular site the specimen is selling on. If that’s not a violation of forum rules. Thanks.
  21. Possible Triassic tracks

    Mercer County, New Jersey, USA. Hello, I recently found these two specimens and was wondering if they look good for Triassic tracks. If so, I heard they are very difficult to attribute to a certain species but any information or leads on that would be greatly appreciated (or should I just stick to the Cretaceous streams ). Note - these are NOT from the spot I found my last trackway (#5 on link below), I've just been obsessed lately with finding similar spots close to home. As always, all help is greatly appreciated! -Frank
  22. Mud Ripples, maybe some roots

    The remains of a muddy area.
  23. Dinosaur footprints

    Found these in East Central Arizona. A deep wash has cut through a rock ledge containing lots of the footprints. Still working on trying to get some of the bigger rock slabs hauled out.
  24. Multiple fossils found at Aust Cliffs, Bristol

    I recently visited Aust Cliffs by the River Severn in Bristol, UK. I believe the fossils are almost entirely Triassic, as the other layers aren't fossiliferous. These were found in broken blocks on the foreshore but most likely originated at the Rhaetian Penarth series at the top of the cliff, as this is where the bone beds are found. I can post more photos if needed, however these are the best I could get at the time on my phone. Any help would be appreciated #1 #2 #3 The black piece is hard and shiny if that helps #4 The shiny part is just over 5mm long. It looks like scales on a fish? Due to the size this is the most I could zoom in while keeping it in focus. #5 This is in a much larger block but the fossil is about 15mm long. Is it bone?
  25. http://artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec=11&int_new=116226#.XWQllUcwjIU Short video (in Spanish) https://www.presstv.com/Detail/2019/08/24/604300/Paleontologists-Mammal-Squirrel-Film-Ice-Age
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