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Found 473 results

  1. Footprint maybe?

    Found this not far from the other footprints. This is sandstone. I can’t really tell for sure.
  2. Passaic Formation NJ

    Hello all, I have seen and read about finding triassic apatopus, theropod, and ornithischian dinosaur prints/fossils in the passaic formation in NJ. I was wondering if anyone new of any locations where productive passaic is accessible? If not I am always looking for other good fossil hunting grounds in NJ (other than Navesink formation creeks and Sayreville amber, which I am quite familiar with).
  3. The Anisian (Middle Triassic) ammonite faunas of Nevada have long been known to provide the most complete sequence for this stage in the world, with many genera such as Gymnotoceras, Frechites, and Nevadites being represented in abundance at classic sites such as Fossil Hill in the Humboldt Range. Here I will illustrate three less common to rare forms that are also present in Middle Anisian strata in Nevada. Unionvillites hadleyi (Smith) Provenance: Humboldt Range, Congress Canyon near Unionville Age: Middle Anisian, Hyatti Zone, Hadleyi Subzone A well-preserved specimen showing the braided keel. Reference: Bucher, H., "Ammonoids of the Hyatti Zone and the Anisian Transgression in the Triassic Star Peak Group, Northwestern Nevada, USA" (Palaeontographica 223, pp. 137-166, Stuttgart, 1992). This keeled, tuberculate form has been reported from a few localities in the Humboldt Range. Semibeyrichites sp. Provenance: Humboldt Range, Big Canyon north of Unionville Age: Middle Anisian, Hyatti Zone, Mctaggarti Subzone Reference: Bucher (1992) above. Bucher reported two specimens from the Humboldt Range as the first occurrence of this genus in the western hemisphere. This specimen was found very close to Bucher's locality. Chiratites bituberculatus Monnet and Bucher Provenance: south of Favret Canyon, Augusta Mountains Age: Middle Anisian, Shoshonensis Zone, Mojsvari Subzone Reference: Monnet, C. and Bucher, H., New Middle and Late Anisian (Middle Triassic) ammonoid faunas from northwestern Nevada (USA): taxonomy and biochronology (Fossils and Strata, 52, 2005). Monnet and Bucher proposed this species on the basis of a single specimen from the Augusta Mountains. I have since discovered about six specimens at another nearby locality.
  4. Triassic bone

    Hi everyone , anyone know what this bone is? My guess is a pachystropheus vert. It measure 17mm long and is Rhaetian, Triassic Found in Somerset, UK. Westbury formation. Thanks.
  5. What is it? concretion? egg?

  6. Happy with my shark spine

    Hi everyone , Just thought I’d like to share this find I made recently. It’s a nice. Hybodont cf. hybodus shark spine from the Rhaetic, Westbury Formation of England. It measures about 12cm. Took about 30mins to an hour extraction and about three hours repair so far. Still haven’t fully repaired it yet. It’s like a jigsaw without the cover! Biggest one I’ve ever found!
  7. Four Triassic teeth

    Found these four, if someone can take a look. All from Bull Canyob. 1 - A preondactylus tooth. 5mm. Now, I know this is from Italy, so I'm guessing name is wrong. But is it pterosaur? 2 - Fabrosaurus. 3mm 3 - Prosauropod. 4mm 4 - Eudiomorphodon - 2mm. Another species I thought was from Italy. Many thanks
  8. Barely a month had gone by since my last trip to New Mexico and Colorado, but I already had plans for this trip in the works. Primary focus this time, which was a solo trip, was fossil collecting, visiting well known sites that have been on my radar for quite some time. I flew out to Salt Lake City and drove directly to Kemmerer, WY. My first stop there was Fossil Butte National Monument: Here is a view of the visitors center (free admission) and the surrounding barren, but awesome landscape that surrounds it:
  9. Possible trackway?

    Formation: Thaynes Fm. NOT Nugget Sandstone. Age: Early to Middle Triassic I’ve got a real brain puzzler here. I believe it is a trackway given the regular spacing and exact same prints but I don’t know what would have made it. I’ve put the north arrow to point out a third partial track. What do you think?
  10. I picked this up a while ago from the yard of a rockhound who is now deceased, but they could not tell me anything about it at the time anyway... all they could say was it was likely collected somewhere here on Vancouver Island, which would make it either Triassic Parson Bay/Sutton or Quatsino Formation, or Pennsylvanian/Permian Mt Mark or Buttle Lake Fm. I don't think it's likely to be from any of the younger formations. These structures look suspiciously like sponges to me, but I can't say for sure. They've obviously been silicified, which makes ID difficult. Any ideas? I noticed the feature marked with a red circle while looking thru the photos. It might be indicative of ID or maybe I'm just seeing things. I've not bothered to shrink the photos, as I want people to be able to see whatever detail there is on this thing. Hopefully they will load... I'll post one at a time if I have to.
  11. Collection

    Hi all, after seeing all these nice collections from other members I also want to share the collection of my father and I with you. The collections is of various time periods and sites. We started collecting in 2009 close to home in a quarry nearby Maastricht called 't Rooth (sadly this quarry is close for visitors since 2016). From there on we started visiting other quarries and the collection started too grew massively. We frequently visited the ENCI, Winterswijk and Solnhofen. I will start off with some of the display cabinets
  12. Nothosaurus specialist needed

    Hi! I recently bought "so called" Nothosaurus vertebra, but seller didn't have any proof of origin of the specimen. Could you confirm that this is a Nothosaurus vertebra? It was found in triassic site in Silesia, Poland. Another question. Why this bones are do small? Could it be a juvenille reptile or example of a smaller species?
  13. A number of collectors are very interested in Triassic Dinosaur tooth material, however, lots of misinformation exists, partially because little is known and dealers want to sell product. My knowledge is very limited so I tried to put together an assemblage of current information that has been published so that we can all become better versed on this topic. I'm not saying its complete but its the best I can do with my limited knowledge. Most technical papers on this subject are outdated, difficult to read for a novice and not complete enough. Fortunately a recent, legible paper was published in 2015 by Heckert & Lucas that has helped me. I've tried to extract the pertinent information, associated with teeth, since that what most collectors are interested in. First let me get on my sandbox and say that we should NOT assume that what is being sold is accurately described regardless who is selling it or how much you like a dealer. Very little is known and even less is described. If a seller insists what he has identified is accurate, have him show you the technical documents that supports his diagnosis. There are a number of theropods and archosaurs in these assemblages that have serrated teeth so identification is difficult. Triassic dealers similar to those in the Kem Kem which label everthing Spinosaurus like to label everything Coelophysis. Just be cautious..its your money. Almost all the teeth you see sold come from New Mexico so I will focus in that region. A Map of New Mexico with the Triassic outcrops shown below as well as the associated Counties. The numbers correlate to the stratigraphic formations shown below in Figure 4. Figure 4 The Zuni Mountains in West-Central NM are from the lower Chinle Group (Bluewater Creek Fm) and contain Tetrapod fossils amphibians and phytosaurs and aetosaurs. Dinosaurs are possible but nothing is diagnostic. Faunal List of the lower Chinle Group Zuni Mountains Northern/West Central New Mexico has yielded some of the most interesting Vertebrate Fossils most associated with Coelophysis at Ghost Ranch. Included in this group are the Petrified Forest and Rock Point Formation of the western counties. Chindesaurus bryansmalli, Tawa hallae and Daemonosaurus chauliodus are considered valid a dinosaurs in the Petrified Forest Fm. Coelophysis bauri is valid from the Rock Point Formation. Faunal List of the Petrified Forest and Rock Point Formation - Key on this list is Coelophysis bauri in the Rock Point Fm Northeasten New Mexico (Bull Canyon and Redonda Formations). Heckerts 2015 paper comments that dinosaur fossils remains are rare in the Bull Canyon Formation. The coelophysoid Gojirasaurus quayi has been described but its taxonomic placement is uncertain. Herrerasauridae tooth fragments have been found but nothing has been assigned to a taxon. Heckerts & Lucas 2015 Paper on Triassic Vertebrate Paleontology in New Mexico https://libres.uncg.edu/ir/asu/f/Heckert_Andrew_triassic.pdf Bull Canyon Formation 2001 Paper on Vertebrate Fauna https://nmgs.nmt.edu/publications/guidebooks/downloads/52/52_p0123_p0151.pdf Latest placement ( Hans-Dieter Sues et al 2011 ) Identifying Coelophysis bauri Teeth - There is lots of variation their teeth and I will show a few types. The Museum of Northern Arizona publication Coelophysis describes the teeth as follows: All the teeth are recurved Premaxillary teeth: rounded cross-section, smaller teeth are ribbed but smooth on larger ones. None show serrations. Maxillary Teeth: the first tooth is recurved with no serrations, second tooth has serrations only on the posterior carina. All the other maxillary teeth have serrations on both edges. Some of the teeth the serrations may be limited to the upper part of the anterior (mesial) edge. Dentary Teeth: the first seven teeth lack serrations, eight tooth serrations only on the posterior edge. Subsequent teeth have serrations on both edges. The first four teeth are elliptical (rounded) in cross-section being compressed after that. Anterior teeth may contain ridges. Serrations are very fine 8 to 9 per millimeter on the posterior (distal) edge. (other publications say 7/mm) Distal Carina Denticles Premaxillary, Maxillary and Dentary teeth shown - Dentary tooth Maxillary Tooth Anterior Denticles Posterior Maxillary Tooth Paper on Coelophsis Teeth by Currie and Buckley Coelophisis.pdf Additional images of the teeth with no supporting info Good overall paper on C. bauri but does nothing to increase our knowledge on how to describe its teeth https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292525024_The_paleobiology_of_Coelophysis_bauri_Cope_from_the_Upper_Triassic_Apachean_Whitaker_quarry_New_Mexico_with_detailed_analysis_of_a_single_quarry_block Ken Carpenter described these teeth from the Bull Canyon fm as cf Coelophysis. Other Theropods Gojirasaurus quayi : one tooth was described with the holotype however it was found isolated and cannot be positively assigned to this species. (Added a few pages below) Chindesaurus bryansmalli : not aware of any skeletal material Daemonosaurus chauliodus The paper does not get into detail on the teeth. See below http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royprsb/278/1723/3459.full.pdf Tawa hallae : http://www.thefossilforum.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=503864
  14. Fossil footprints found in Sydney suburb are from the earliest swimming tetrapods in Australia by Phil Bell, University of New England https://phys.org/news/2020-05-fossil-footprints-sydney-suburb-earliest.html Roy M. Farman et al. Australia's earliest tetrapod swimming traces from the Hawkesbury Sandstone (Middle Triassic) of the Sydney Basin, Journal of Paleontology (2020). DOI: 10.1017/jpa.2020.22 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-paleontology/article/australias-earliest-tetrapod-swimming-traces-from-the-hawkesbury-sandstone-middle-triassic-of-the-sydney-basin/2C787D68A8F2F300B2111A0E68E5981C Yours, Paul H.
  15. I was wondering if there are any permian to cretaceous reptile/amphibian fossils that even an newbie like me can acquire without having to dig or pay a huge price for,I looked for permian and triassic stuff and it is really hard to find such things Are barasaurus legal to buy?
  16. I'm looking for some places to look for Triassic fossils in west texas. I've heard that there is some exposed along US-84 but I'm looking for a little more around there.
  17. I have my eye on them, but I thought I'd check first. First is labelled as a small carnivore Gralkator/Coelophysis from Scotland late Triassic to Early Jurassic. Matrix is 220mm x 77mm The 2nd pair is again small carnivore but from Hampton County USA, early Jurassic. Thanks
  18. Ammonites Epidaurus Greece

    Hello! I am doing some labelling and archiving so that I do not loose track of my fossils. Most of them, I have managed to narrow down to species, but for these little fellas. Some info: Triassic age Scale bar: 1cm 70% Sturia sp.or 30% Arcestes sp. Date of discovery: 2001 (My first found fossils) Location: 37°36'19"N 23°04'25"E The matrix is what locally call "Epidaurus marble". Same marble was used on the upper part of the Ancient theatre nearby, that's why it is full of cephalopods. I have read THIS and THIS post, plus a publication mentioned on the second post so I am between Sturia and Arcestes, mostly balanced towards Sturia. I compared against many photos, but I believe this made up my mind: Currently, this outcrop is not exposed. Used to be a small quarry either for marble or for fossil extraction. Has been covered with soil more than a decade and transformed into an olive oil plantation. Confirmed in person 12/2019. I know my chances are too thin since the samples are two small, but if someone is experienced to Hallstat phase, I would appreciate some advice. Wouldn't bother so much, but these are my firsts and hold deep sentimental value. Thanks in advance!
  19. Fish in a nodule needs ID

    Hi All, I bought a fossil fish on online a while ago. The seller identified it as "PTERONISCULUS Fish fossil Trias 250 mio Madagascar" It would be nice to confirm and also get additional information on possible locality, ideally reference to a scientific publication. I'm really curious about in situ conditions where the fossil was found. Could it be desert, or a mine. It seems like the fish nodules are not that rare if you look on-line but it's hard to find anything about the place of origin. Clearly, recognizing a fish species in this condition is a rare skill. So, many thanks in advance to those who will weigh in and share an opinion and information. Pictures are attached.
  20. I recently purchased a small lot of Bull Canyon Formation, New Mexico teeth, most of which were Phytosaurid. Then i noticed this tooth and how eerily similar it is too Pterosaur teeth from Morocco. From what i've read, there have been documented Eudimorphodon fossils collected from the Chinle Group, however i cannot find pictures for comparison. The closest teeth i can find from New Mexico are Preondactylus and Peteinosaurus teeth that have been put up for sale on multiple websites, though the information provided with them is unhelpful. I've included a photo of the "front", "back" and a side profile of the tooth. If clearer photos are needed to assist with identification, i can get some taken and uploaded.
  21. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  22. Triassic Cephalopods fro Epidaurs

    Hi Guys, I'm taking advantage of this period of staying at home to recheck and better identify the fossils from my collection. Someone can tell me the genus and species of these triassic fossils of Epidaurus. Thanks in advance and please stay home if you can !!
  23. Encrinus liliiformis (Lamarck 1801)

    From the album Echinodermata

    Complete length 20cm. Crown: 10cm. From the German Middle Triassic Muschelkalk at Alverdissen, North Rhine Westfalia. This was part of my reward for translating a colleague's website into English for him.
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