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Found 388 results

  1. https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/12/europe/new-dinosaur-species-switzerland-scn-trnd/index.html http://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/sci-tech/notatesseraeraptor-frickensis_new-dinosaur-species-discovered-in-switzerland/45091466 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-019-0941-z.epdf?referrer_access_token=8cckgyaahQAqVoJUce22T9RgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0N3BrFRbswtT52o3s1u2Px4-OoA2PYT2up7NhcGNycCEBbA5x661JDk1c2J92fi6Ad0PFlhNsnirYSTXsRrBctG1kE8n82eshkrYRKKz7qRqEYLTL46A_VDrSGDUEzt2ApQ1VDILxin2d89vZxcSf9QN9swddQYv24BSR1Itil6ADf_j9DYcsF80w2ZDOv0Ver63Ytui3Nh8JdvrDR0dIxuSdbVyGT8Bi6t6Vt3wHjDhST22qIEfmECwIztRFBLRbo%3D&tracking_referrer=edition.cnn.com
  2. Fossil reptiles from West Timor

    Mulder and Jagt (2019) came out with a new paper concluding that the putative mosasaur Globidens timorensis is actually an ichthyosaur related to Tholodus and Xinminosaurus, and that the sediments on West Timor in which it was found are Triassic in age. There is also another Triassic marine reptile found in West Timor, the Mixosaurus-like ichthyosaur Mixosaurus timorensis. Is anyone not familiar with little-known marine reptiles from West Timor. I'm guessing that some Triassic ichthyosaurs that swam in the waters of present-day China traversed the waters of present-day Indonesia. Eric W.A. Mulder and John W.M. Jagt (2019). Globidens(?) timorensis E. VON HUENE, 1935: not a durophagous mosasaur, but an enigmatic Triassic ichthyosaur. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen 293 (1): 107–116. doi:10.1127/njgpa/2019/0835.
  3. Saurichthys dawaziensis Wu et al., 2009

    From the album Vertebrates

    iSaurichthys dawaziensis Wu et al., 2009 Middle Triassic Dawazi Yunnan PRC together with other unidentified fish
  4. Possible triassic track?

    I found this near the 476 turnpike where they tore up all the ground and exposed the New Brunswick Formation. This formation is triassic. I went to a dump site where the construction company took all the rock. Is this possibly some sort of trace fossil from a lizard or sphenodontid? (If you neer to see it better flip your phone or device upside down)
  5. Vertebra

    I found this in a central TX creek where I regularly find shark teeth and lower Cretaceous fossils. Thanks
  6. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/ancient-crocodiles-would-have-ordered-salad-180972518/ https://cosmosmagazine.com/palaeontology/some-prehistoric-crocs-were-vegetarians
  7. Ord Perm Triassic Ammonite or ?

    In a recent trip to the Candelaria Mining district of west central Nevada some rocks that suggest fossil forms where found. Is this a fossil? How big where coiled Nautiloids in the Ordivician? Is this more likely Permo-Triassic? I have more pics but the file size limit. Maybe another post later. The rock formations in the area per Mineral, Deposita 29, 318-329 (1994) MINERALIUM DEPOSITA O Springer-Verlag 1994 The Candelaria silver deposit, Nevada - preliminary sulphur, oxygen and hydrogen isotope geochemistry the basement consists of Ordovician cherts of the Palmetto complex; this is overlain unconformably by Permo-Triassic marine clastic sediments (Diablo and Candelaria Formations); these are structurally overlain by a serpentinitehosted tectonic melange (Pickhandle/Golconda allochthon); all these units are cut by three Mesozoic felsic dike systems. The local rock descriptions are obviously simplified. Palmetto Basin Assemblage - Shale, chert, quartzite, greenstone, and limestone Nolan Belt - Shale, chert, phyllite, quartzite, and limestone Diablo Siliciclastic Overlap Assemblage - Sandstone, siltstone, limestone, conglomerate, and carbonaceous limestone Siliciclastic Overlap Assemblage - Shale, sandstone, and limestone Candearia FM Golconda Terrane - Basinal, volcanogenic, terrigenous clastic, and minor carbonate rocks Siliciclastic Overlap Assemblage - Conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, and limestone Siliciclastic Overlap Assemblage - Shale, sandstone, and limestone Shale with interbedded sandstone and minor limestone characterize the Lower Triassic Candelaria Formation (Ferguson, Muller, and Cathcart, 1954).
  8. Brazil’s Triassic Coprolites

    For those who are interested, this paper on Brazil’s Triassic Coprolites is open access till July 15th. It’s a rather extensive piece, and I must admit I could only briefly skim it, but I imagine others on here may find it very informative. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/let.12251 PDF version: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/let.12251 perhaps it might peak @GeschWhats interest?
  9. Branch or strobilus?

    Hello. Is it a branch with leaf-scars and cone scars or a cones? I hope you will understand me Late triassic, Russia, Chelyabinsk region.
  10. Serpianotiaris coaeva QUENSTEDT 1873

    From the album Invertebrates

    Serpianotiaris coaeva QUENSTEDT 1873 Middle Triassic Anisian/Ladinian Trochitenkalk Formation Crailsheim Germany apical side Diameter (without spines) 4cm
  11. Last week I stumbled upon a deposit that might be yielding a bit more. Several bone fragments, a vertebrae (I think), lots of boney plate material, and a small tarsal bone. I have collected this area for years an never found as much in one spot as I did last week. Going back with proper tools for looking further. Wish me luck.
  12. I found this on the foreshore at Penarth beach (rocky) close to cliffs. I assumed it could be a trace fossil of some kind? Somebody on Reddit suggested perhaps Fusulinids, and they certainly resemble those from what I’ve seen, but it doesn’t look to tie in with the age of the rocks at the site.
  13. researching obscure dinosaurs

    I am currently spending a bit of time every day looking into dinosaurs that are off the beaten path. One of my goals with our education programs is to introduce kids to more obscure dinosaurs that they will not have heard of. We have a few fossils that accomplish that goal already in our program such as Thescelosaurus and Struthiomimus. Scientists and collectors know these dinosaurs but kids do not. They are that next level of knowledge beyond T-Rex, Trikes, Sauropods, etc. We are adding a Leptoceratops tooth for this reason. it is a weird little dino that the kids will not know but will be really interested in. Ceratosaurs are another that get that reaction too. They are overshadowed by the more well known large Theropods. We do this within the Dromoaeosaur family by busting out our Atrociraptor tooth. It is just different enough to really get their attention. I have been reading up on Alvarezsauridae lately and they are a really interesting group of dinosaurs. I doubt we will obtain any fossils but they may be worth mentioning without fossils which is not a common practice for us. I think the Troodontids fit this bill as I have yet to hear any kids mention them and I will be working on getting a Troodontid tooth here in the next few months. It is on the list for sure. I had a lot of fun getting ideas for non-dinosaurs to include in our programs so I thought it would be really fun and informative to get the opinions of the very sharp minded dinosaur collectors here. Keep in mind that our goal is to give fossil examples with the dinosaurs we discuss so do not get to crazy with species from China or South America lol Keep suggestions to North America, Africa, and Europe. I am not adverse to tracks and eggs either. What are some obscure or strange dinosaurs that we can look into to expand our programs?
  14. Identifying layers of sediment

    Need some help identifying layers of fossil sediment along a steep cliff side, having a hard time distinguishing time zones. Thank you!
  15. Temnospondyl help

    Here's a hard one: This is a very nice temnospondyl skeleton (you can see the sclerotic rings!). It measures about 11cm long from snout to what is preserved of the tail. My question is: Can anyone tell me the genus/species and provenance of the fossil? I was told by the previous owner that it was possibly Platyrhinops from the Lower Triassic of Germany, but I have no idea. It looks like maybe a very well preserved Permian age Discosauriscus from the Czech Republic or some sort of temnospondyly from the Pfalz of Germany. I am happy to share more photos. Thanks for the help :-)
  16. Lavernock bone bed

    This is being sold as a bone bed from Lavernock, Wales. It is labelled as possibly dinosaur. It is rhaetic triassic. Could it be dinosaur?
  17. Hi! I recently aqcuired quite a lot of "microfossils" to kick off my Triassic collection, as I personally find it one of the most interesting time periods and while I am aware possibly not all of them are ID'd correctly I just wanted to get some nice fossils from this time period regardless of their ID's. All the fossils I acquired are from the Bull Canyon Formation, Dockum Group, San Miguel County, New Mexico, USA (Norian age) But I myself am not very knowledgeable yet in this material as I just started my collection but I am aware that some if not most of the ID's on these fossils given by the seller might be wrong as everything I read about the Bull Canyon formation says that the formation isn't that well discribed yet. I tried to make the photo's as good as I could, but it wasn't always easy given their extremely small size, so I hope the quality is good enough to work with. So I am kinda hoping is someone here on the forum would like to give it a try to see if he/she could confirm or disprove given ID's. Thank you in advance! The first set of 2 teeth were listed as the Phytosaur "Pseudopalatus" teeth which after doing a bit of research is considered a junior synonym for "Machaeroprosopus" The next collection of 3 teeth were listed as the Pseudosuchian "Revueltosaurus" The next tooth was listed as a "Theropod indet" tooth, and I know there are at least 2 species of theropod present at Bull Canyon, a Coelophysid called Gojirasaurus and a herrerasaurid called Chindesaurus. But I am not even sure whether this tooth is dinosaurian or not. The next set of teeth were listed as "Arganodus" lungfish teeth And the final tooth was listed as a "Sphenodont" (Rhynchocephalia indet.) tooth with affinities to Clevosaurus (which is found in Nova Scotia, Great Britain and China)
  18. Tropites sp.,

    From the album Triassic In Situ Pictures

    Strong condensed Tuvalian layer with Tropites sp., Jovites sp., Juvavites sp.,
  19. Norian Hardground with ammonoids.JPG

    From the album Triassic In Situ Pictures

    Triassic/Norian hardground with visible ammonoids. Genera are: Arcestes, Cladiscites, Rhacophyllites, Megaphyllites, Placites.
  20. Today I attended the 2019 Warsaw Mineral Expo, which is held every year in March Of course the majority of stands are with jewelry, however there is always one room devoted to fossils:
  21. Anisian Fossilblock.JPG

    From the album Triassic In Situ Pictures

    Upper Anisian Fossilblock with abundantFlexoptychites.
  22. Upper Norian ammonoids.JPG

    From the album Triassic In Situ Pictures

    Block with small upper Norian ammonoid cross sections
  23. Triassic-Carnian,Joannites sp..JPG

    From the album Triassic In Situ Pictures

    Two Joannites sp. in lower Carnian limestone.
  24. Triassic-Norian Ammonoids - Kopie.JPG

    From the album Triassic In Situ Pictures

    Cross sections of Norian Arcestes sp.
  25. Ladinian Gymnites.JPG

    From the album Triassic In Situ Pictures

    Ladinian Gymnites sp. in situ.
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