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  1. FF7_Yuffie

    Lance Formation Tyrannosaur Tooth

    Hello everyone, A Tyrannosaur tooth here, it measures 1.1 inches, and is from Wyoming (Weston County) Lance Formation. If anyone can ID it as Nano or T-Rex, that would be much appreciated. There some very slight serrations, which I have zoomed in on. Thanks for the help.
  2. Although the research regarding this was only published this month, there has been a lot of intense speculation and controversy as to whether theropods especially Tyrannosaurus Rex were comparable to being "primates" of their time. "According to her findings, theropods had as many neurons in their brains as monkeys do today, with the T-Rex boasting "baboon-like" numbers of up to 3 billion neurons. That's a pretty scary level of intelligence for a killing machine the size of a house.With that many neurons, a T-Rex wouldn't have just possessed uncanny cognition. It also might have l
  3. Daze

    Tyrannosaurus Rex Tooth?

    Hi, according to the seller this is a 2 inch Tyrannosaurus Rex tooth from the Hell Creek Formation, Harding County, South Dakota. Really interested in your opinions, thanks.
  4. A while back, I was researching the number of likely Tyrannosauroidea dinosaurs that inhabited the Southern Hemisphere (I know this is a very controversial subject) in the Early Cretaceous for an extra credit research paper I was doing for my freshmen year college geology class. As I was looking for data for the paper, I found an unusual data entry on the paleontological database website fossilworks.org - It lists Tyrannosauridae remains from Jurassic Madagascar. http://www.fossilworks.org/cgi-bin/bridge.pl?a=collectionSearch&collection_no=55391 The specimen
  5. I came across a weird tooth online. The seller claims that it is an all-natural Tyrannosaurus rex tooth from the Hell Creek fm. (no more specifics than that), though it features very odd preservation. It is nearly pure white in color. As I have little experience in tooth identification and telling apart fakes, I would like to gauge everyone's opinions on whether or not this tooth is completely authentic and identified correctly. If I receive any more information about the specimen, I will make sure to list it here. *New info*: The seller has informed me that the tooth h
  6. Hi all! I am relatively new to the forum as well as to collecting but I have put together a small collection of various specimens over the last year. This collection will keep growing and I will continue to post when I get new specimens. I have some more small specimens but for now I am only posting a selection of my collection. Enjoy! -Ben
  7. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaurid premaxillary tooth

    "That some of these teeth are mammalian incisors there can be but little doubt..." - O. C. Marsh1 This kind of incisor-like ("incisiform") tooth was originally thought to have belonged to a large, Cretaceous mammal. Later discoveries revealed that these teeth were actually the front teeth ("premaxillary teeth") of Tyrannosaurs - and are now known as a hallmark of their clade, Tyrannosauroidea (along with fused nasals). Closely-spaced, parallel grooves on bones suggest that Tyrannosaurs used these teeth to selectively scrape meat from bone2. Identification Tyrannosaurid premaxi
  8. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur premaxillary tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    This kind of incisor-like ("incisorform") tooth was originally thought to have belonged to a large, Cretaceous mammal. Later discoveries revealed that these teeth were actually the front teeth ("premaxillary teeth") of Tyrannosaurs - and are now known as a hallmark of their clade, Tyrannosauroidea. Closely-spaced, parallel grooves on bones suggest that Tyrannosaurs used these teeth to scrape meat from bone. Given the size, this is from a very young animal. Should Nanotyrannus be valid, then this should be considered an indeterminate Tyrannosaurid.
  9. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur premaxillary tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    This kind of incisor-like ("incisorform") tooth was originally thought to have belonged to a large, Cretaceous mammal. Later discoveries revealed that these teeth were actually the front teeth ("premaxillary teeth") of Tyrannosaurs - and are now known as a hallmark of their clade, Tyrannosauroidea. Closely-spaced, parallel grooves on bones suggest that Tyrannosaurs used these teeth to scrape meat from bone. Given the size, this is from a juvenile animal (smaller than "Jane"). Should Nanotyrannus be valid, then this should be considered an indeterminate Tyrannosaurid.
  10. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur premaxillary teeth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    These strange, incisor-like teeth were originally thought to have belonged to a large Cretaceous mammal. Later discoveries showed that these teeth matched the front teeth of young Tyrannosaurs quite well. Given closely spaced, parallel feeding traces on bones, these "incisorform" teeth likely were used to scrape meat from bone.
  11. ThePhysicist

    Judithian Theropod

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A theropod tooth I recently acquired from the JRF. Sold as a juvenile Tyrannosaurid, but I'm not fully convinced.
  12. jikohr

    Are any of these T Rex?

    Hi everyone! I acquired a bunch of Tyrannosaur tips from Hell Creek recently. Most were sold as Tyrannosaur indet. which is what I've been going by for them except the ones with a really thick, almost circular cross section. These three I'm kinda on the fence as they're pretty robust but not circular. All three are Hell Creek but from different localities which I have next to each one. Also when I took the cross section measurements I didn't take those at the end of the base because it was uneven on all of them, being broken tips. So what I did was I went up a little to a complete
  13. ThePhysicist

    T. rex tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    It's remarkable that the minute features of this tooth can be preserved with such clarity after 66 million years!
  14. Nanotyrannus35

    Possible Tyrannosaurid Bone

    I have this piece of chunkosaur from the Lance Formation. It looks like it might have the trabecular structure of tyrannosaur bone. It's from the Lance formation of Weston County, WY. Thanks for any help.
  15. Hello, I am hoping someone can help me! I have a Daspletosaurus tooth from the old man formation. It was found with a coarse, tar like substance stuck around the tooth (shown in photos) that won’t come off. I’ve tried rubbing acetone but that didn’t work. I tried picking a piece off but the enamel came with it. Are there any alternative methods I can use without risking any damage to the tooth?
  16. Tyrannosaur tooth I found in North Carolina's Black Creek group yesterday afternoon. Based on the serration count, I'm thinking it's Dryptosaurus, the line of serrations in the second pic is 1.58cm long (measuring by hand), and I counted 31..I do plan to check them for certain later with a stereoscope, but my understanding is Dryptosaurus has <11 serrations/0.5cm and Appalachiosaurus >11/0.5cm. If anyone who deals with this regularly wants to help with the ID, please feel free.
  17. jikohr

    Nano or Indet. Tyrannosaur?

    Hi everyone! Another little gem I acquired recently, sold to me as Nano, figured it was Nano, now looking at it I'm wondering if it's indeterminate as the base is damaged so I can't see a pinch, and it's kinda thick. So what do you all think? Any insight is appreciated as always! CH is 3.06 cm CBL is 1.41 cm CBW is .786 cm (I also got a digital caliper finally) Powder River County Montana Hell Creek
  18. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaurid vs Dromaeosaurid

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    As a theropod tooth aficionado, I thought it useful to compare two families present in the Hell Creek Formation. They become increasingly difficult to distinguish as they get smaller, but this graphic presents some features which may be used to differentiate them on two similarly-sized exceptional specimens. Keep in mind there is some variability due to position, ontogeny, etc., so it's beneficial to study more than one tooth for each family.
  19. jikohr

    Rex or Nano?

    Hi everyone! I have my eye on a potential Rex but the seller isn't sure if it's a rex or a huge Nano. The measurements they gave are 1.75 x .6 x .37 Inches so about 4.46 x 1.52 x .94 cm. It's from powder River County Montana The tooth is an anterior and the oval shaped base combined with it being that large of an anterior says rex to me, but I figured I'd seek a second opinion.
  20. ThePhysicist

    Worn T. rex tooth (annotated)

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Not the prettiest tooth, but I very much enjoy fossils like this that demonstrate behavior and tell a story. T. rex and other Tyrannosaurs were unusual among theropods in that they consumed the entire carcass of an animal - bones and all. Most theropod dinosaurs have ziphodont teeth, thin and knife-like, good for cutting muscle from bone. The thick and robust teeth of adult Tyrannosaurs, coupled with their incredible bite force, allowed them to shatter and pulverize bone - even those of the large, formidable herbivores they hunted. Despite the robustness of their teeth, Tyrannosaur
  21. ThePhysicist

    Worn T. rex tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Not the prettiest tooth, but I very much enjoy fossils like this that demonstrate behavior and tell a story. T. rex and other Tyrannosaurs were unusual among theropods in that they consumed the entire carcass of an animal - bones and all. Most theropod dinosaurs have ziphodont teeth, thin and knife-like, good for cutting muscle from bone. The thick and robust teeth of adult Tyrannosaurs, coupled with their incredible bite force, allowed them to shatter and pulverize bone - even those of the large, formidable herbivores they hunted. Despite the robustness of their teeth, Tyrannosaur
  22. The_bro87

    Theropod foot bones?

    Hello! I found these foot bones (called tarsals I believe?) from Wibaux county Mt in the Hell Creek formation. The seller says that there’s a possibility these are theropod bones, specifically saying bone 1 might be a dromeosaur bone, and bone 2 could possibly be from a tyrannosaur. I looked at some photos online and the only real difference I could tell is some of the dromeosaur bones could be proportionally longer. I also don’t know how to tell if these are even from dinosaurs or some other reptile/bird. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks.
  23. Sergiorex

    Trex or nano

    Found in hell creek fm
  24. patrickhudson

    Tyrannosaur model

    Had an idea a while back to try and make a replica maxillary cast of a tyrannosaur and set some of my real teeth I’ve collected from the JRF in it. This was attempt one - took me about an hour. Wanted to see if it was worth putting more effort into it. Next step would be getting someone much smarter than me to help identify some of my teeth so they can be in the correct area of the mouth. I’ve got about 40 to choose from. For now, it was just to get an idea.
  25. jikohr

    Are these Juvenile Rexes?

    Hi everyone! I acquired these two pretty recently and immediately though Juvenile Rex, but after that other one I figured I should be more careful and ask for a second opinion. Both are from the Hell Creek of Powder River County, Montana. Tooth 1: Crown Height: 11 mm Crown Base Length: 5.5 mm Crown Base Width: 5 mm Mesial serration density: 4.5 per mm Distal serration density: 4 per mm Tooth 2: Crown Height: 14 mm Crown Base length: 7 mm Crown Base Width: 5 mm Mesial serration density: 4.5 per mm Distal serration density:
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