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  1. Does anyone know the catalog no. of this skull? And is there any paper mentions this skull? or more descriptions for it. thx guys help. have a lovely day.
  2. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur premaxillary tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    This kind of incisor-like ("incisorform") tooth was originally thought to have belonged to a large, Cretaceous mammal. Later discoveries revealed that these teeth were actually the front teeth ("premaxillary teeth") of Tyrannosaurs - and are now known as a hallmark of their clade, Tyrannosauroidea. Closely-spaced, parallel grooves on bones suggest that Tyrannosaurs used these teeth to scrape meat from bone. Given the size, this is from a very young animal. Should Nanotyrannus be valid, then this should be considered an indeterminate Tyrannosaurid.
  3. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur premaxillary tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    This kind of incisor-like ("incisorform") tooth was originally thought to have belonged to a large, Cretaceous mammal. Later discoveries revealed that these teeth were actually the front teeth ("premaxillary teeth") of Tyrannosaurs - and are now known as a hallmark of their clade, Tyrannosauroidea. Closely-spaced, parallel grooves on bones suggest that Tyrannosaurs used these teeth to scrape meat from bone. Given the size, this is from a juvenile animal (smaller than "Jane"). Should Nanotyrannus be valid, then this should be considered an indeterminate Tyrannosaurid.
  4. Hi, guys. Does anyone have some high-quality images of Albertosaurus sarcophagus skulls (or maxilla /dentary)? please. and the following images were my sharing, which I found on the internet. Thanks for your guys' sharing. have a lovely day guys.
  5. Updated Nov 25, 2022 Collectors, online sellers and some dealers periodically ask me to help them in the identification of tyrannosaur type teeth. So I thought I would put together a guide from Western North America (US/Canada) to help in identification. The following is the current understanding of those Tyrannosaurids described/known with the stratigraphic unit where they are found. If I missed any let me know. Albertosaurus sarcophagus : Horseshoe Canyon Formation cf Albertosaurus indet: Wapiti Formation Gorgosaurus libratu
  6. There's a new documentary about dinosaurs (Prehistoric Planet). In this documentary we see a lot of dinosaurs and their appearance is quite different from movies (JW series) one of the most interesting is the Tyrannosaurus rex. This is because The T.rex had lips instead of showing cusps of their maxilla teeth. Actually, I really like the new look. It looks more like an animal than a monster from movies, but i'm very curious why did T.rex have lips? what is their evidence? I'm more interested in the basis for their idea. Does anyone know which paper has mentioned or discu
  7. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur premaxillary teeth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    These strange, incisor-like teeth were originally thought to have belonged to a large Cretaceous mammal. Later discoveries showed that these teeth matched the front teeth of young Tyrannosaurs quite well. Given closely spaced, parallel feeding traces on bones, these "incisorform" teeth likely were used to scrape meat from bone.
  8. I have an interesting question when I read a paper (Hurum, Jørn H.; & Sabath, Karol. Giant theropod dinosaurs from Asia and North America: Skulls of Tarbosaurus bataar and Tyrannosaurus rex compared) I only found that it was mentioned in the content, T.rex had stereoscopic vision(Stereopsis), but I did not find any description of the vision of Tarbosaurus. Does anyone know that Tarbosaurus had stereovision? If Yes or No, please explain the reasons and provide a paper to prove it.Please Thanks guys. have a lovely day
  9. Kikokuryu

    Tiny Judith River Theropod Teeth

    These teeth were sold as a baby tyrannosaurid and a dromaeosaurid/bird respectively. Some other specimens from this lot have been posted here if I recall. But they are from North of Havre, Montana close to the Canadian border. Apparently they are from quite an old collection from around 1950-70s. The provenance should place it solidly in Judith River Formation. Since these teeth were selling somewhat quickly, I just grabbed them and decided on figuring it out later. The first tyrannosaurid tooth does have some similarities to Dromaeosaurus with the mesial twist, but I could be wron
  10. WyomingRocks!

    Theropod Tooth ID please!

    Hello, I am going to post a tooth I found a few days ago. I will try to follow the theropod tooth description post on the photos and info. Letme know if I am missing anything. Thanks for any help. It was kind of hard to miss! Fmtn: JRF State: MT County: Hill County CH: 33 mm
  11. Hello so I was wondering if it’s possible to identify a theropod bones vs herbivores easily. I heard theropods are more hollow and have a honeycomb structure but I’m wondering if there are any more difference. I know that if they are found near a skeleton obviously it’s more likely to be from the same dinosaur. I was wondering since I see this seller that sold a lot of bones that he claimed is tyrannosaurid and he seems pretty knowledgeable so I was wondering if it was likely the description are correct. They are generally 4-7 inches long and are “limb bones.” I was thinking about buying on
  12. This small tooth was found in powder county, it measures a little over half a inch and I wanted help with identification . Seller listed as either Nanotyrannus or Tyrannosaurus rex. I also think it’s most likely tyrannosaurid, and I wanted to know whether it’s tyrannosaurid and if it is whether it’s more likely to be Nanotyrannus or Tyrannosaurus rex. Im assuming it’s just a indeterminate tyrannosaurid because of the base damage and size, but please let me know you opinions.
  13. I’m not sure what species or group these dinosaur teeth are from, first one seems to me to be either Tyrannosaurid or Dromeosauird. I’m learning towards Dromeosaurid but I’m obviously no expert.The tooth measures 1/4 inch x3/16 and is from Garfield county Montana. Second tooth correct me if I’m wrong but doesn’t seem to be Tyrannosaurid nor Dromeosaurid. It has a weird shape and I’m not sure what group of dinosaur it’s from. It’s also from Garfield county, Montana. And measures half an inch x1/16. Sorry about image quality
  14. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaurid vs Dromaeosaurid

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    As a theropod tooth aficionado, I thought it useful to compare two families present in the Hell Creek Formation. They become increasingly difficult to distinguish as they get smaller, but this graphic presents some features which may be used to differentiate them on two similarly-sized exceptional specimens. Keep in mind there is some variability due to position, ontogeny, etc., so it's beneficial to study more than one tooth for each family.
  15. ThePhysicist

    Worn T. rex tooth (annotated)

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Not the prettiest tooth, but I very much enjoy fossils like this that demonstrate behavior and tell a story. T. rex and other Tyrannosaurs were unusual among theropods in that they consumed the entire carcass of an animal - bones and all. Most theropod dinosaurs have ziphodont teeth, thin and knife-like, good for cutting muscle from bone. The thick and robust teeth of adult Tyrannosaurs, coupled with their incredible bite force, allowed them to shatter and pulverize bone - even those of the large, formidable herbivores they hunted. Despite the robustness of their teeth, Tyrannosaur
  16. ThePhysicist

    Worn T. rex tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Not the prettiest tooth, but I very much enjoy fossils like this that demonstrate behavior and tell a story. T. rex and other Tyrannosaurs were unusual among theropods in that they consumed the entire carcass of an animal - bones and all. Most theropod dinosaurs have ziphodont teeth, thin and knife-like, good for cutting muscle from bone. The thick and robust teeth of adult Tyrannosaurs, coupled with their incredible bite force, allowed them to shatter and pulverize bone - even those of the large, formidable herbivores they hunted. Despite the robustness of their teeth, Tyrannosaur
  17. Thefossilman92

    Very tiny tyrannosaurid tooth

    I have this very tiny tyrannosaurid tooth from hell creek formation, south dakota. Im wondering if it's possible to know if the tooth is from a infant nano or t-rex? Distal serration density: about 6/mm Can't see any intact serrations on the mesial side. Crown Height: 4 mm Crown base-lenght: 2,5 mm Crown base-width: under 1 millimeter, about 0,8 mm to roughly estimate (very hard to measure this one).
  18. Mrhenky3

    Nanotyrannus or other?

    I've recently aquired this Tyrannosaurid tooth from a local shop. The shop sold it as Nanotyrannus lancensis. I think the tip has been repaired, but not quite sure that it is worn or repaired. However the tooth does not show the indents on the bottom, which is sometimes to be expected on Nanotyrannus I heard. I was wondering if somebody could take another look for me and share their opinion, about what species this tooth belonged to. Thanks in advance. The tooth was found in the Hell Creek Formation in Montana
  19. Hi all, I recently acquired this Theropod indet. tooth speculating it might be a Dromaeosaurus albertensis. It was found in the Judith River Fm., is 0.72 inch long and serration count over 5mm is 20 mesial and 18 distal. It is a very stout tooth, so might as well be a Tyrannosaurid. It has a twist in the mesial carina and though denticles are very close in width, mesial ones are shorter, and the shape of denticles does not look classic Tyrannosaurid to me. I would like hear your opinions please.
  20. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Sold by the BHI as Nanotyrannus lancensis. However, given the uncertain status of Nanotyrannus' validity, I chose to label it as Tyrannosaurid for now. It is interesting to compare to my other small Tyrannosaur teeth of the same/similar position. The base is clearly more compressed than my baby rex tooth (which is also smaller).
  21. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    A Tyrannosaur tooth from Eastern Montana. Given the basal "pinching," this would be Nanotyrannus lancensis if it's valid (otherwise it's T. rex). Interesting to compare it to my other small Tyrannosaur teeth. The tip was probably broken after fossilization, but the gouges on the labial face may be inflicted while the tooth was in use. Note that the enamel is well-preserved with sharply resolved texture and is still clear.
  22. ThePhysicist

    T. rex tooth

    Identification This is a classic T. rex tooth. It's clearly Tyrannosaurid by its robusticity, similar serration densities on each carina (mesial carina counted by the "roots" of the denticles as they are completely worn off), and chisel-shaped serrations. Those qualities with its locality and formation mean it must be the one and only. Notes The Crown Height Ratio (CHR) suggests a posterior position (it's short and stout). There's evidence of wear on the tip and mesial carina.
  23. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur tooth

    Identification Tyrannosaur teeth characteristically have similar serration densities on each carina, with chisel-shaped denticles. Though small, this tooth matches those qualities, and doesn't resemble other smaller theropods like Dromaeosaurids. Identified as Cf. T. rex based on its similarity to another, larger tooth in my collection. Notes This tooth is from a juvenile individual. Serration densities illustrated in the above photos. There is a slight pathology (bend) near the tip.
  24. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur tooth

    Identification Tyrannosaur teeth have similarly-sized serrations on each edge, and the serrations are chisel-shaped. This is a classic "Nano-morph" tooth being compressed and blade-like (which is the primitive condition of Tyrannosaurs). Notes This tooth has excellent preservation, with serrations crossing the tip, and clear enamel. There is a minor wear facet near the tip on the lingual side, indicating this is from the left maxilla.
  25. Hello, this tooth has baffled me for years. I can't tell if it is a juvenile tyrannosaurid dentary tooth or a cf. Richardoestesia gilmorei tooth Its locality info is Montana, Two Medicine Formation The tooth has a serration density of 19/5mm on the distal mid-line. Unfortunately the mesial carina is worn down so that crucial data is missing The CH is 11.5 mm, CBW is 7 mm and CBL is 4.5 mm As far as I am aware, juvenile tyrannosaurid (with the exception of T. rex) have slender teeth while as this tooth is somewhat robust. Meanwhile, Richardoestesi
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