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  1. ThePhysicist

    T. rex tooth

    Identification This is a classic T. rex tooth. It's clearly Tyrannosaurid by its robusticity, similar serration densities on each carina (mesial carina counted by the "roots" of the denticles as they are completely worn off), and chisel-shaped serrations. Those qualities with its locality and formation mean it must be the one and only. Notes The Crown Height Ratio (CHR) suggests a posterior position (it's short and stout). There's evidence of wear on the tip and mesial carina.
  2. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur tooth

    Identification Tyrannosaur teeth characteristically have similar serration densities on each carina, with chisel-shaped denticles. Though small, this tooth matches those qualities, and doesn't resemble other smaller theropods like Dromaeosaurids. Identified as Cf. T. rex based on its similarity to another, larger tooth in my collection. Notes This tooth is from a juvenile individual. Serration densities illustrated in the above photos. There is a slight pathology (bend) near the tip.
  3. This is my first of what I hope to be many posts on TFF, so any suggestions on how to adhere to proper etiquette or improve the reader’s experience is welcome. In 2020, I found my first few teeth while hiking the Alberta badlands. In hind sight, they weren’t all that impressive. But at the time, I was ecstatic! Needless to say, I was hooked. During the winter that followed, I found myself itching to get back out to see what else I could find. In an attempt to scratch my itch, I began looking for online forums and discovered r/fossilid on Reddit which then led me here to TFF
  4. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur tooth

    Identification Tyrannosaur teeth have similarly-sized serrations on each edge, and the serrations are chisel-shaped. This is a classic "Nano-morph" tooth being compressed and blade-like (which is the primitive condition of Tyrannosaurs). Notes This tooth has excellent preservation, with serrations crossing the tip, and clear enamel. There is a minor wear facet near the tip on the lingual side, indicating this is from the left maxilla.
  5. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur teeth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Formation Tyrannosaur teeth from various counties in Montana. Largest CH (Crown Height): 22 mm
  6. Updated Dec 30, 2021 Collectors, online sellers and some dealers periodically ask me to help them in the identification of tyrannosaur type teeth. So I thought I would put together a guide from Western North America (US/Canada) to help in identification. The following is the current understanding of those Tyrannosaurids described/known with the stratigraphic unit where they are found. If I missed any let me know. Albertosaurus sarcophagus : Horseshoe Canyon Formation cf Albertosaurus indet: Wapiti Formation Gorgosaurus libratus : Dinosaur P
  7. Hello, this tooth has baffled me for years. I can't tell if it is a juvenile tyrannosaurid dentary tooth or a cf. Richardoestesia gilmorei tooth Its locality info is Montana, Two Medicine Formation The tooth has a serration density of 19/5mm on the distal mid-line. Unfortunately the mesial carina is worn down so that crucial data is missing The CH is 11.5 mm, CBW is 7 mm and CBL is 4.5 mm As far as I am aware, juvenile tyrannosaurid (with the exception of T. rex) have slender teeth while as this tooth is somewhat robust. Meanwhile, Richardoestesi
  8. ThePhysicist

    Infant Hell Creek Tyrannosaurid?

    Hi y'all, got this small theropod in the mail; I bought it suspecting it was Tyrannosaurid. Upon in-hand inspection, I believe that suspicion is confirmed. It bears close resemblance to one of my larger juvenile T. rex maxillary teeth. It also appears to have a slight pathology near the apex - a slight bend. @Troodon Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Wibaux Co., MT, USA CH: 9 mm Mesial serration density: ~ 5.3 / mm Distal serration density: ~ 5 / mm Serration densities: Serrations:
  9. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur distal denticles

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA ~ 3.6 / mm Notice that the enamel is still clear, with the dentine visible underneath. If Nanotyrannus is valid, then this is Nanotyrannus.
  10. ThePhysicist

    Hell Creek Tyrannosaur

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA If Nanotyrannus is valid, then this is Nanotyrannus.
  11. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur tooth tip

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA If Nanotyrannus is valid, then this is Nanotyrannus. Note that the serrations wrap around the tip ("apex") of the tooth as is common in unworn Tyrannosaurs.
  12. I saw a tooth of an Tyrannosaurid Indet. The price looks good and the size is 3.3 inches including the repaired lower end. The seller told that this is from Judith River Formation, Northern Montana, and No restoration. Can anyone find any evidence of restoration? I can't find any... And.. this is another one from the same seller. This is also Tyrannosaurid indet, and from JRF.
  13. Hi all, I could not resist and took another shot on my quest to obtain a Dakotaraptor tooth. Here the tooth in question this time: It was found in the Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County. Measurements are: CH 1,41 cm - CBL 0,68 cm - CBW 0,3 cm - denticles per 5mm are 22 mesial and 19 distal. Note the slight tilt of the denticles towards the tip of the tooth. It's the best fit I have found so far, what deviates from the dePalma description is the shape of the base, it has a pinch, but I would not consider it rectangular. As a side note, it looks exactly like the base of Acheroraptor
  14. Two Tyrannosaurid teeth that I ordered early this week has arrived. This is the first tooth that I want to show, which is a tooth of a juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex (or Nanotyrannus). Since I personally believe that the Nanotyrannus is an invalid genus, I think this is a juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex tooth. For those who do not agree, this is a Nanotyrannus tooth. This tooth is from Hell Creek formation of Garfield Co. Montana. This is an 1-3/8 inch, and has some chips and scratches at the labial side, but I think this is still a great tooth.
  15. TOM BUCKLEY

    @troodon post

    A couple of days ago there was a thread that provided links to @Troodon 's id posts about identifying tyrannosaurid teeth. I didn't bookmark them and can't locate them. Any guidance would be appreciated. Thanks.
  16. it seems to be much more basal, but the news keeps saying close relative of t-rex like its a much more derived member of the group
  17. BellamyBlake

    Theropods

    I decided to expand my obsession with sharks towards an obsession with theropods. I received my first piece today, a Spinosaur from Morocco, even making a display resembling the rolling deserts of the Sahara for it. This thread will be updated when any further theropod teeth arrive
  18. BellamyBlake

    Gorgosaurus libratus

    I have here a Tyrannosaurid tooth identified as Gorgosaurus libratus. It's 3/4" and the provenance is Montana. I'm wondering if the Gorgosaurus claim appears to be accurate. Thank you, Bellamy
  19. musicnfossils

    Dinos & More Dinos

    Just wanted to post some of my favourites from the last few months of collecting. Winter is only a few short months away so I’m heading to the field whenever I can. We’ve got some tyrannosaurid (gorgosaurus or daspletosaurus) toe bones as of this morning! Very excited about that. Bunch of verts including a big one, I know most of the verts aren’t from the same animal but I like to set them up like a tail for visitors The ornithomimid claw, a few tyrannosaurid teeth, croc scute & skull section (I believe that vert belongs to a croc as well, the one before the string) little th
  20. Abstraktum

    Theropod tooth from Judith River Fm.

    Hello everybody So I got this small tooth from Hill County, Montana, Judith River Formation, labeled as a Theropod indet. tooth. Length is just around 0.5 inches. CM as seen in the pictures. Any hope for an ID beyond Theropod indet? Thx!
  21. musicnfossils

    Bonebed

    Got access to some more private land near Dinosaur PP, company owned. My friend was familiar with this area since he was a kid so he said we should check it out, and we found some awesome dinosaur fossils! So far nothing was collected, but yesterday I got ahold of the land supervisor for the company and after receiving some paperwork coming my way on Monday I will be permitted to surface collect anything I find in this area, so this thread will be updated with more finds this coming week. Here are some photos of what we found so far: A lot of the bones looked like they were from a
  22. Hi all, I recently acquired this Theropod indet. tooth speculating it might be a Dromaeosaurus albertensis. It was found in the Judith River Fm., is 0.72 inch long and serration count over 5mm is 20 mesial and 18 distal. It is a very stout tooth, so might as well be a Tyrannosaurid. It has a twist in the mesial carina and though denticles are very close in width, mesial ones are shorter, and the shape of denticles does not look classic Tyrannosaurid to me. I would like hear your opinions please.
  23. Hey guys, this tooth was listed as a dinosaur tooth(tyrannosaurid), does anyone know what this belonged to?
  24. Hi all, I have been staring at this tooth for quite a while now with question marks in my head. It was found in the Bissekty Formation, Kyzylkum desert, Uzbekistan. It's 27mm long (1.01 inch) and properly labeled as Theropod indet. However, the seller raises the possibility of it being a Dromaeosaurid. Serrations do look different in length and width, a count on screen gives me distal 13/5mm and mesial 16/5mm. What throws me off is the rather 'stout' crown and round cross section, more Tyrannosaurid in my view. However, I have no reference images and the only publication I found (Sues and
  25. kinnza1

    Tyrannosaurid Indet Confirmation

    Hello all, Recently acquired 2 teeth, found and sold together, that I would love some insight and second opinions on. Both teeth are described as Tyrannosaurid Indet, from the Judith River Formation. The seller described that he purchased them both together from the harvester, but due to the fact he was not the original collector, the information is isolated to the above information. Smaller tooth is 15/16" long, dark chocolate color, and 1/4" wide. Serrations are present on front and rear edges, with serrations starting midway on the front edge.
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