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  1. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur premaxillary tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    This kind of incisor-like ("incisorform") tooth was originally thought to have belonged to a large, Cretaceous mammal. Later discoveries revealed that these teeth were actually the front teeth ("premaxillary teeth") of Tyrannosaurs - and are now known as a hallmark of their clade, Tyrannosauroidea. Closely-spaced, parallel grooves on bones suggest that Tyrannosaurs used these teeth to scrape meat from bone. Given the size, this is from a very young animal. Should Nanotyrannus be valid, then this should be considered an indeterminate Tyrannosaurid.
  2. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur premaxillary tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    This kind of incisor-like ("incisorform") tooth was originally thought to have belonged to a large, Cretaceous mammal. Later discoveries revealed that these teeth were actually the front teeth ("premaxillary teeth") of Tyrannosaurs - and are now known as a hallmark of their clade, Tyrannosauroidea. Closely-spaced, parallel grooves on bones suggest that Tyrannosaurs used these teeth to scrape meat from bone. Given the size, this is from a juvenile animal (smaller than "Jane"). Should Nanotyrannus be valid, then this should be considered an indeterminate Tyrannosaurid.
  3. Along with an interest in Pennsylvanian fish diversity, I've also had an interest (like many others studying Paleontology) in the diversity of Dinosaur genera during the Cretaceous era (particularly the Theropod diversity in North America during the Maastrichtian period 72.1-66 Million years ago). Compared to the preceding Campanian period (83.6-72.1 Million years ago), I've noticed there is a slightly less number of known Tyannosauridae genera in Western North America (at the time a separate continent known as Laramidia). I've come up with a list of confirmed known and possible Tyrannosaurida
  4. ThePhysicist

    T. rex tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    It's remarkable that the minute features of this tooth can be preserved with such clarity after 66 million years!
  5. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaurid vs Dromaeosaurid

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    As a theropod tooth aficionado, I thought it useful to compare two families present in the Hell Creek Formation. They become increasingly difficult to distinguish as they get smaller, but this graphic presents some features which may be used to differentiate them on two similarly-sized exceptional specimens. Keep in mind there is some variability due to position, ontogeny, etc., so it's beneficial to study more than one tooth for each family.
  6. ThePhysicist

    Worn T. rex tooth (annotated)

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Not the prettiest tooth, but I very much enjoy fossils like this that demonstrate behavior and tell a story. T. rex and other Tyrannosaurs were unusual among theropods in that they consumed the entire carcass of an animal - bones and all. Most theropod dinosaurs have ziphodont teeth, thin and knife-like, good for cutting muscle from bone. The thick and robust teeth of adult Tyrannosaurs, coupled with their incredible bite force, allowed them to shatter and pulverize bone - even those of the large, formidable herbivores they hunted. Despite the robustness of their teeth, Tyrannosaur
  7. ThePhysicist

    Worn T. rex tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Not the prettiest tooth, but I very much enjoy fossils like this that demonstrate behavior and tell a story. T. rex and other Tyrannosaurs were unusual among theropods in that they consumed the entire carcass of an animal - bones and all. Most theropod dinosaurs have ziphodont teeth, thin and knife-like, good for cutting muscle from bone. The thick and robust teeth of adult Tyrannosaurs, coupled with their incredible bite force, allowed them to shatter and pulverize bone - even those of the large, formidable herbivores they hunted. Despite the robustness of their teeth, Tyrannosaur
  8. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    A young T. rex tooth. The preservation of the enamel is fantastic, and I like the dark hues. The serrations are also in great shape. There is some minor feeding wear on the tip.
  9. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Sold by the BHI as Nanotyrannus lancensis. However, given the uncertain status of Nanotyrannus' validity, I chose to label it as Tyrannosaurid for now. It is interesting to compare to my other small Tyrannosaur teeth of the same/similar position. The base is clearly more compressed than my baby rex tooth (which is also smaller).
  10. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    A Tyrannosaur tooth from Eastern Montana. Given the basal "pinching," this would be Nanotyrannus lancensis if it's valid (otherwise it's T. rex). Interesting to compare it to my other small Tyrannosaur teeth. The tip was probably broken after fossilization, but the gouges on the labial face may be inflicted while the tooth was in use. Note that the enamel is well-preserved with sharply resolved texture and is still clear.
  11. ThePhysicist

    T. rex tooth

    Identification This is a classic T. rex tooth. It's clearly Tyrannosaurid by its robusticity, similar serration densities on each carina (mesial carina counted by the "roots" of the denticles as they are completely worn off), and chisel-shaped serrations. Those qualities with its locality and formation mean it must be the one and only. Notes The Crown Height Ratio (CHR) suggests a posterior position (it's short and stout). There's evidence of wear on the tip and mesial carina.
  12. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur tooth

    Identification Tyrannosaur teeth characteristically have similar serration densities on each carina, with chisel-shaped denticles. Though small, this tooth matches those qualities, and doesn't resemble other smaller theropods like Dromaeosaurids. Identified as Cf. T. rex based on its similarity to another, larger tooth in my collection. Notes This tooth is from a juvenile individual. Serration densities illustrated in the above photos. There is a slight pathology (bend) near the tip.
  13. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Tyrannosauridae (Nanotyrannus-morph) Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA A classic Nanotyrannus Tyrannosaur tooth: compressed and blade-like. Exceptional preservation, with a minor wear facet near the tip on the lingual side (indicating it's from the left maxilla). I really like the color.
  14. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Fm., Garfield Co., MT, USA This is from the right maxilla of a juvenile individual (note the lingual wear). Art by RJ Palmer
  15. ThePhysicist

    T. rex posterior

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Fm., Fallon Co., MT, USA The CHR suggests a posterior position for this somewhat beat-up T. rex tooth.
  16. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur tooth

    Identification Tyrannosaur teeth have similarly-sized serrations on each edge, and the serrations are chisel-shaped. This is a classic "Nano-morph" tooth being compressed and blade-like (which is the primitive condition of Tyrannosaurs). Notes This tooth has excellent preservation, with serrations crossing the tip, and clear enamel. There is a minor wear facet near the tip on the lingual side, indicating this is from the left maxilla.
  17. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex posterior

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Fm., Carter Co., MT, USA More information Art by RJ Palmer
  18. From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Fm., Wibaux Co., MT, USA Minor compression, common in maxillary teeth. It closely matches my larger juvenile T. rex.
  19. ThePhysicist

    Posterior T. rex tooth apex

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Fm., Fallon Co., MT, USA Not in the best shape, but a clearly robust tip with some feeding wear.
  20. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex maxillary tooth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Fm., Wibaux Co., MT, USA This is a juvenile Tyrannosaurid tooth. The serration densities are similar on each carina, the serrations are chisel-shaped and robust, the tooth is not recurved, and the mesial carina is straight. It closely resembles my larger T. rex maxillary tooth in cross section.
  21. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur distal denticles

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA ~ 3.6 / mm Notice that the enamel is still clear, with the dentine visible underneath. If Nanotyrannus is valid, then this is Nanotyrannus.
  22. ThePhysicist

    Hell Creek Tyrannosaur

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA If Nanotyrannus is valid, then this is Nanotyrannus.
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