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  1. I have several thousand well preserved shark and ray vertebrae from the Eocene of Virginia. I also have many more thousands of bony fish vertebrae from the Eocene of Virginia. See the group pictures in this post. The paper plates are 9 inches in diameter for size reference. There is very little written on fossil shark and ray vertebrae that I can find in the literature and what is written is scattered throughout a good number of different papers. I have a unique, extensive assemblage of many different vertebrae types and forms which represent the fish species from the Eocene of
  2. Found this little fossil on the James River shoreline near Surry, Virginia (US). Wondered whether it might be an incomplete dolphin ear bone, but not entirely confident in that ID! It's just about an inch long.
  3. Ketik

    Unknown vertebra?

    Hello, I’m new to this group and was hoping for help identifying this find. I found it on a well known fossil beach on the east coast of VA, USA. It looks like a vertebra to me, but this was my first fossil hunting trip and I was expecting to find shark teeth. Any ideas on what this is from? Or if it is really ancient? Thank you for your help!
  4. Coryrsmith23

    Popes Creek, Westmoreland, VA, Potomac

    Please help me identify 2 unusual fossils I discovered November 2022 at Popes Creek on the Potomac River, Westmoreland VA. I have attached images.
  5. Some of the stuff from recent trips. I have had a great year for cowshark teeth @Fin Lover ! One particular spot has produced the best, some even intact. My "usual" finds are sand tiger teeth; most of these, except the biggest, have sharp cusps. And another spot produced mako/ great white teeth. (Some glitches with my scanner; not the image I had edited(?)) May append another later. Weather has been great, cool in the morning, warm with low humidity in the afternoons. Finally getting some rain (too late for my garden) and washing out some teeth and other stuff. Fishing has been goo
  6. Chesapeaking

    Meg?

    This tooth is very worn and has no evidence of serrations. It is about 3 cm in length. A possible worn cusplet is present on one side. The way the tooth is shaped along with what appears to be a bourlette lead me to believe this is a megalodon tooth, but I'd like to get another opinion.
  7. cck

    Hear Hear!! Cetacean ear

    Hi all! Looking for advice and insight on this cetacean ear bone ( periotic? ) … All info is welcome and thanks!
  8. Highlights from a couple of recent trips. I found two Hemipristis/ snaggletooth, the big one is perfect (rare for me). Also a nice cowshark tooth, tips intact and most of a root (also rare for me). More gray sharkteeth than usual, fewer angel shark and drum "teeth" (less gravel where I was digging?) I think the black piece with embedded gravel is a drum tooth plate; not sure what the yellow piece is? (when in doubt "Turtle"). A bonito nose and the usual sand tiger spikes. Fun to be hunting in the cooler weather, less mosquitoes and deer flies, still frogs and salamanders although th
  9. Hello, Some friends and I went to Chippokes State Park in Virginia last week. The park is beautiful, and going down to the beach was very nice. We ended up settling at a sand bar formed at the mouth of the College Run creek. Although, we did not find anything too remarkable at first sight - other than lots of fossil oyster and clam shells - after sitting down for a bit we found our first shark tooth. With renewed hopes we kept scouring the area and found a couple more smaller ones - no meg big or small sadly... I did decide to bring with me a gallon Ziploc bag half full of material
  10. NOVA_ranger

    Mini-meg, or something else?

    Found this nice little tooth on Chippokes plantation down in southern VA. It’s just over 1 1/4 inches. It looks meg-ish, but it just seems a bit off. Any ideas?
  11. A few interesting ones from recent trips (tried to flip and scan each side). Finally found a cowshark symphysial, but like most from the creek, it was broken (fewer but better shape from the beaches? Hopefully not broken from screening.) The pathological tooth I posted last trip (a sand tiger quite bent), along with dolphin tooth and skate scute. No big makos, but a few inch or so. A lot of fossil coral chunks at the spot. Not sure the mammal tooth is ID-able; tips of points missing. I like the jaw bone, not common here. A few angel shark teeth, fairly common here.
  12. Andúril Flame of the West

    Localities in the Virginia Area

    Hello everyone, This is my first posting on TFF (although I've been lurking on the forum for a while) and I am excited to be joining a community centered around one of my main interests. I have seen that this forum houses a very kind and helpful community, and I was hoping that some may be interested in helping a - very new and inexperienced - fossil hunter. I will be in the Charlottesville area for Labor Day weekend and I am in search of any tips for finding fossils in that area or general locations where they might be. I am willing to drive up to 3 hours to other locations in Vi
  13. Dr. Stephen Godfrey, the Curator of Paleontology at the Calvert Marine Museum, has a special interest in bones and coprolites with bite marks. I recently found the below fish coprolite (20 mm length) with bite marks in the Eocene, Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia and donated it to the Calvert Marine Museum. Some bite marks are infilled with Pyrite. It is by far the nicest example of a fish coprolite with bite marks that I’ve seen from the Eocene, Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia (I’ve collected over 50,000 fish coprolites (shark, ray and bony fish) from the Nanjemoy Formation over the last 25
  14. Blue Ridge

    Petrified Wood?

    Hi - I collected these specimens on my property in the Blue Ridge Mtns/Shenandoah Ridge, and I’m being told they are examples of petrified wood. I’m not so sure. I’d love to hear opinions from folks who know a lot more about these formations than I do. Thank you!
  15. Chesapeaking

    Shark Tooth ID

    Found along the Potomac River, and is half an inch long at best. It's not that visible in these photos but there are faint hints of serrations.
  16. Chesapeaking

    Otodus?

    Found along the Potomac River in Virginia. About 1.5 inches in length.
  17. Chesapeaking

    Bone ID

    Having a lot of difficulty with this one. It's about 1 inch in length. Found along the Potomac River.
  18. Found on the beach at Westmoreland State Park, VA on Fossil Beach.
  19. The assistant curator of paleontology at the Virginia Museum of Natural History is researching squamates, which includes snakes, from the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia. A couple of friends and I have given him recently a large number of snake vertebrae, mostly from the sea snakes Palaeophis casei and Palaeophis toliapicus, from the Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia, to support his research. We will donate the specimens needed for his research. He is definitely interested in my large Palaeophis sp. vertebra in the below pictures:
  20. Kiddo found this while looking for shells at the beach in the Southern Chesapeake Bay area of Virginia. Looks like driftwood, solid and heavy like rock. Weighs 19 grams and is approx 5cm x 3cm x ¾cm. I told her I would ask. She really hopes it's a bone fossil.
  21. Chesapeaking

    Shark Tooth ID

    I've been trying to figure out what shark this tooth is from. It was found in the Potomac River near Colonial Beach, VA and is about 1/2 of an inch in length.
  22. Been out of action for awhile. And lots more competition nowadays. Finally got out. My old places had been hit hard. Worked a new spot, and while nothing big, some teeth and curious stuff (stingray barb, small ecphora-- none perfect, some vertebrae, a few angel shark teeth, broken cowshark and mako). Good toget out again!
  23. I just sent the below Eocene lignitized seeds/fruits from Virginia to a paleo botanist at the Smithsonian Institution, who will use a new CT scanner that makes this material vastly more interpretable than before, to study them. Since these seeds/fruits are not mineralized like petrified wood they should have been stored in Glycerin with a bit of thymol, which is an anti fungal agent, rather than in gem jar cups. You can see the discoloration of some of the foam from deterioration of the seeds/fruits over the 15 to 20 years that most of them were stored. I hope that they are still useful. I
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