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Found 39 results

  1. Some finds from a weekend hunt in the Late Pennsylvanian / Early Permian Dunkard Group of West Virginia. Any corrections or identifications are welcome and appreciated. Scale throughout is in mm.
  2. Novice to identifying fossils, if there's a lower rung on the knowledge scale it would probably be more applicable. Found this about 30cm deep in north central West Virginia about 12 miles south of Cumberland MD. Our yard is about 10cm of topsoil and at least a meter of hard packed shale (that's as far down as I've had the pleasure of digging for my projects). I've found other similar items but this one split to show the interior which caught my interest.
  3. I found this fossil around 4 years ago in a creek in West Virginia. I'm curious to know if it is possible to determine the time period when this fossil might have formed, the possible creature it might have been, and just more about it in general. The fossil is composed of a very deeply embedded scale pattern that is about 2.5 inches in diameter. Only about 1/2 of the fossil is very visible, and the fossil is in a layered black rock. The fossil appears as though it is long, like a snake would have been, but unfortunately I only have a small portion of the original fossil, so it's hard to tell. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
  4. What on earth is this?

    I have a regular collecting spot in Capon Bridge, WV, which is my go-to spot for Eldredgeops Rana trilobites. On my most recent outing I picked up this odd thing, and I have no idea what to make of it. There is a pencil just to the left of the fossil, for scale. The fossil is fairly flat, hardly three-dimensional, so no need for side photos. It appears to be three-pronged and pyritized.. pyritized in the same way that the trilobites often are at this location. The local shale is early to middle Devonian, I *think* Needmore Formation. Any thoughts welcome!
  5. Help ID this please

    This was given to me by a retired coal miner a few years ago. He said he found it in a coal mine many years ago in McDowell county West Virginia. Any kind of info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
  6. Hey, I am heading down to West Virginia for a family trip and I was wondering if anyone knew of some good local spots near Sutton? The closest place I found is about 2 hours away from there and it might just be too far to convince my family to follow. I know the area is Pennsylvanian formation, but I don't know much other than that.
  7. Semi transparent shells?

    I recently bought a smallish "fossil kit" online. Just some fossils in a bag from an outfit in West Virginia. I figured there would be a lot of steinkerns & bad preservation. I wasn't wrong in that. Lots of gastropod steinkerns, mangled urchins & urchin spines & star shaped crinoid stem sections. And some shells that seem sort of crystallized that light shines through. 2 reg pics of one of the better ones + 2 pics of light shining through. Pic #5 is an edge view of one of the broken ones & #6 is what I think may be beekite, which is present on several of them. Not really concerned with shell id for the most part, more curious as to what replaced the shells to make them semi transparent like this. Almost crystallized or agatized.
  8. Mississippian bryozoa?

    Hey all, after a long work-related hiatus I have found myself back in a part of West Virginia that has fossils! Yesterday I found a long bed of unknown material exposed on a ridge in northern Monroe County with a lot of fossils in it. I don't know the formation, but from what I could find out this area should be Mississippian. Am I right in thinking the attached photo is a bryozoa? Also, if I collect more samples, take photos of the outcrop, and give a good description of the material might it be possible to identify the formation? Thanks
  9. Seed Fossil?

    These 2 are part of a many (50 or more) fossils/imprints I found in a creek bed on a visit this summer to our family farm in Ritchie County, WV. Since we're going back for a visit next week, I thought I'd try to ID these now and look for more while I'm there again. The bulk of the fossils/imprints I've ID'd as ferns, and maybe lycophytes (if my research so far is correct) but can't find anything on the imprints in the attached photos. I'm new to plant fossils, so would appreciate some help in ID'ing this set. Here's what I know: All the fossils/imprints I found, including the attached, were in the same 3-4 meter area along a shallow (1-1.5 meter high) creek bank in Ritchie County, WV; They were found in thick sheets of wet, muddy shale; and The 2 imprints in the photos fit into one another as a match/pair. Here are my questions: What are/were the 2 ovals that fit into one another in the photos? Is there anything else of interest I should be noticing in the attached photos and/or in the other similar fossils/imprints I've found? Note that the last photo are the 2 pieces flipped over. Thanks in advance.
  10. Gastropod or Cephalopod?

    Found this (Needmore Formation) at Lost River Site near Wardensville, WV. Size is 40mm, 1.5 inches. Anyone know what this might be? Thank you.
  11. West Virginia fossils

    While backpacking in the Cranberry Wilderness I found this soccer size rock with what appears to be carbonized plant material encased in a sandstone matrix. Can anyone shed further light on this specimen? Thank you
  12. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 22, 2018. United States Faunas, Localities and Stratigraphy (by State) Utah Utah - Precambrian Knoll, A.H., N. Blick and S.M. Awramik (1981). Stratigraphic and Ecologic Implications of Late Precambrian Microfossils from Utah. American Journal of Science, Vol.281. Sprinkel, D.A. and G. Waanders (2005). Stratigraphy, Organic Microfossils, and Thermal Maturation of the Neoproterozoic Uinta Mountain Group in the Eastern Uinta Mountains, Northeastern Utah. In: Uinta Mountain geology. Dehler, C.M., et al. (eds.), Utah Geological Association, Publication 33. Utah - Cambrian Brett, C.E., et al. (2009). Sequence stratigraphy, cyclic facies, and lagerstätten in the Middle Cambrian Wheeler and Marjum Formations, Great Basin, Utah. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 277. Briggs, D.E.G. and R.A. Robison (1984). Exceptionally Preserved Nontrilobite Arthropods and Anomalocaris from the Middle Cambrian of Utah. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 111. Briggs, D.E.G., et al. (2008). Middle Cambrian Arthropods from Utah. J.Paleont., 82(2). Foster, J.R. and R.R. Gaines (2016). Taphonomy and Paleoecology of the "Middle" Cambrian (Series 3) Formations in Utah's West Desert: Recent Finds and New Data. In: Resource and Geology of Utah's West Desert. Comer, J.B., et al. (eds.), Utah Geological Association, Publication 45. (Thanks to piranha for finding this one!) Gaines, R.R., M.J. Kennedy and M.L. Droser (2005). A new hypothesis for organic preservation of Burgess Shale taxa in the middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation, House Range, Utah. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 220. Garson, D.E., et al. (2011). Dynamic palaeoredox and exceptional preservation in the Cambrian Spence Shale of Utah. Lethaia. Gunther, L.F. and V.G. Gunther (1981). Some Middle Cambrian Fossils of Utah. Brigham Young University Geology Studies, Vol.28, Part 1. Hammersburg, S.R., S.T. Hasiotis and R.A. Robison (2018). Ichnotaxonomy of the Cambrian Spence Shale Member of the Langston Formation, Wellsville Mountains, Northern Utah, USA. Paleontological Contributions Number 20 - The University of Kansas, Paleontological Institute. Hintze, L.F. and A.R. Palmer (1976). Upper Cambrian Orr Formation: Its Subdivisions and Correlatives in Western Utah. U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1405-G. Maxey, G.B. (1958). Lower and Middle Cambrian Stratigraphy in Northern Utah and Southeastern Idaho. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, Vol.69. McCollum, L.B. and D.M. Miller (1991). Cambrian Stratigraphy of the Wendover Area, Utah and Nevada. U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1948. Miller, J.F., et al. (2006). Proposed stratotype for the base of the highest Cambrian stage at the first appearance datum of Cordylodus andresi, Lawson Cove section, Utah, USA. Palaeoworld, 15. Miller, J.F., et al. (2001). Proposed stratotype for the base of the Lawsonian Stage (Cambrian Stage 10) at the First Appearance Datum of Eoconodontus notchpeakensis (Miller) in the House Range, Utah, USA. Bulletin of Geosciences, 86(3). Morris, S.C. and R.A. Robison (1988). More Soft-Bodied Animals and Algae from the Middle Cambrian of Utah and British Columbia. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 122. Morris, S.C., et al. (2015). New records of Burgess Shale-type taxa from the middle Cambrian of Utah. Journal of Paleontology. Schneider, L.P. (2000). The Sequence Stratigraphy of the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation in the Drum Mountains of West Central Utah. Masters Thesis - Utah State University. (Thanks to piranha for pointing this one out!) Utah - Ordovician Finnegan, S. and M.L. Droser (2008). Reworking Diversity: Effects of Storm Deposition on Evenness and Sampled Richness, Ordovician of the Basin and Range, Utah and Nevada, USA. Palaios, Vol.23. Vecoli, M., J.H. Beck and P.K. Strother (2015). Palynology of the Ordovician Kanosh Shale at Fossil Mountain, Utah. Journal of Paleontology. Utah - Devonian Denison, R.H. (1952). Early Devonian Fishes from Utah: Part I. Osteostraci. Fieldiana: Geology, Vol.11, Number 6. Utah - Carboniferous Arnold, C.A. and W. Sadlick (1962). A Mississippian Flora from Northeastern Utah and its Faunal and Stratigraphic Relations.Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XVII, Number 11. Girty, G.H. (1910). The Fauna of the Phosphate Beds of the Park City Formation in Idaho, Wyoming and Utah. United States Geological Survey, Bulletin 436. Huttenlocker, A.K., et al. (2018). A multitaxic bonebed near the Carboniferous-Permian boundary (Halgaito Formation, Cutler Group) in Valley of the Gods, Utah, USA: Vertebrate paleontology and taphonomy. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 499. Utah - Permian Collinson, J.W., C.G. St.C. Kendall and J.B. Marcentel (1976). Permian-Triassic boundary in eastern Nevada and west-central Utah. Geological Society of America Bulletin, Vol.87. Huttenlocker, A.K., et al. (2018). A multitaxic bonebed near the Carboniferous-Permian boundary (Halgaito Formation, Cutler Group) in Valley of the Gods, Utah, USA: Vertebrate paleontology and taphonomy. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 499. Utah - Triassic Collinson, J.W., C.G. St.C. Kendall and J.B. Marcentel (1976). Permian-Triassic boundary in eastern Nevada and west-central Utah. Geological Society of America Bulletin, Vol.87 Martz, J.W., R.B. Irmis and A.R.C. Milner (2014). Lithostratigraphy and Biostratigraphy of the Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic) in Southern Lisbon Valley, Southeastern Utah. In: Geology of Utah's Far South. McLean, J.S., R.F. Biek and J.E. Huntoon (eds.), Utah Geological Association, Publication 43. Martz, J.W., et al. (2017). Upper Triassic Lithostratigraphy, Depositional Systems, and Vertebrate Paleontology Across Southern Utah. Geology of the Intermountain West, Vol.4. Utah - Jurassic Charette, E.K. Taphonomy and paleoecology of a Middle Jurassic fossil assemblage, Carmel Formation, southwest Utah. Currie, B.S. (1998). Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Morrison and Cedar Mountain Formations, NE Utah-NW Colorado: Relationships Between Nonmarine Deposition and Early Cordilleran Foreland-Basin Development. Journal of Sedimentary Research, Vol.68, Number 4. Davis, B.M., R.L. Cifelli and G.W. Rougier (2018). A Preliminary Report of the Fossil Mammals from a New Microvertebrate Locality in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Grand County, Utah. Geology of the Intermountain West, Vol.5. Milner, A.R.C. and J.I. Kirkland (2006). Preliminary Review of the Early Jurassic (Hettangian) Freshwater Lake Dixie Fish Fauna in the Whitmore Point Member, Moenave Formation in Southwest Utah. In: The Triassic-Jurassic Terrestrial Transition. Harris, et al. (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 37. Utah - Cretaceous Cifelli, R.L., et al. (1999). Medial Cretaceous Vertebrates from the Cedar Mountain Formation, Emery County, Utah: The Mussentuchit Local Fauna. Utah Geological Survey, Miscellaneous Publication 99-1. Currie, B.S. (1998). Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Morrison and Cedar Mountain Formations, NE Utah-NW Colorado: Relationships Between Nonmarine Deposition and Early Cordilleran Foreland-Basin Development. Journal of Sedimentary Research, Vol.68, Number 4. Eaton, J.G. (2006). Late Cretaceous Mammals from Cedar Canyon, Southwestern Utah. In: Late Cretaceous vertebrates from the Western Interior. (Lucas, S.G. and R.M.Sullivan, eds.) New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 35. Eaton, J.G. (1991). Biostratigraphic framework for the Upper Cretaceous rocks of the Kaiparowits Plateau, southern Utah. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 260. Eaton, J.G. (1990). Stratigraphic Revision of Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) Rocks in the Henry Basin, Utah. The Mountain Geologist, Vol.27, Number 1. Eaton, J.G. and R.J. Cifelli (1988). Preliminary report on Late Cretaceous mammals of the Kaiparowits Plateau, southern Utah. Contributions to Geology, University of Wyoming, Vol.26, Number 2. Eaton, J.G., et al. (1999). Cretaceous Vertebrate Faunas from the Kaiparowits Plateau, South-Central Utah. Utah Geological Survey, Miscellaneous Publication 99-1. Eberth, D.A., et al. (2006). Dalton Wells: Geology and significance of debris-flow-hosted dinosaur bonebeds in the Cedar Mountain Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of eastern Utah, USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 236. Garrison, J.R., et al. (2007). A multidisciplinary study of the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Mussentuchit Wash, Utah: a determination of the paleoenvironment and paleoecology of the Eolambia caroljonesa dinosaur quarry. Cretaceous Research, 28. Hettinger, R.D. and M.A. Kirschbaum (2002). Stratigraphy of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos (Upper Part) and Mesaverde Group in the Southern Part of the Uinta and Piceance Basins, Utah and Colorado. United States Geological Survey, Pamphlet to accompany Geological Investigations Series I-2764. Kirkland, J.L. Utah's Newly Recognized Dinosaur Record from the Early Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation. Survey Notes. Kirkland, J.L. and S.K. Madsen (2007). The Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Eastern Utah: The View Up An Always Interesting Learning Curve. Utah Geological Association Publication 35. Kirkland, J.L., et al. (1999). Distribution of Vertebrate Faunas in the Cedar Mountain Formation, East-Central Utah. Utah Geological Society, Miscellaneous Publication 99-1. McCord, R.D. (1997). Late Cretaceous Microherpetofaunas of the Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah. Ph.D. Dissertation - The University of Arizona. (151 pages) Roberts, E.M. (2007). Facies architecture and depositional environments of the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, southern Utah. Sedimentary Geology, 197. Utah - Paleocene Cifelli, R.L., N.J. Czaplewski and K.D. Rose (1995). Additions to Knowledge of Paleocene Mammals from the North Horn Formation, Central Utah. Great Basin Naturalist, 55(3). Gazin, C.L. (1941). The Mammalian Faunas of the Paleocene of Central Utah, With Notes on the Geology. Proceedings of the United States National Museum, Vol.91, Number 3121. Wells, N.A. (1977). Paleocene-Eocene Lake Flagstaff of Central Utah. Masters Thesis - The Ohio State University. (183 pages) Utah - Eocene Eaton, J.G., et al. (1999). Vertebrates of the Turtle Basin Local Fauna, Middle Eocene, Sevier Plateau, South-Central Utah. In: Vertebrate paleontology in Utah, Gilette, D.D. (ed.), Utah Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publication 99-1. Kelly, T.S., P.C. Murphey and S.L. Walsh (2012). New Records of Small Mammals from the Middle Eocene Duchesne River Formation, Utah, and Their Implications for the Uintan-Duchesnean North American Land Mammal Age Transition. Paludicola, 8(4). Marcantel, E.L. and M.P. Weiss (1968). Colton Formation (Eocene: Fluviatile) and Associated Lacustrine Beds, Gunnison Plateau, Central Utah. The Ohio Journal of Science, 68(1). Murphey, P.C., et al. (2011). Paleontology and stratigraphy of middle Eocene rock units in the Bridger and Uinta Basins, Wyoming and Utah. The Geological Society of America, Field Guide 21. Wells, N.A. (1977). Paleocene-Eocene Lake Flagstaff of Central Utah. Masters Thesis - The Ohio State University. (183 pages) Utah - Pleistocene Broughton, J.M. (2000). Terminal Pleistocene Fish Remains from Homestead Cave, Utah, and Implications for Fish Biogeography in the Bonneville Basin. Copeia, 2000(3). Liggett, G.A. and M.E. Nelson (1993). Vertebrate Taphonomy of the Blonquist Rock Shelter (Pleistocene-Holocene), Summit County, Utah: A Case for Raptoral Accumulation of Bones. The Compass, 70(3). Miller, W.E. (1976). Late Pleistocene Vertebrates of the Silver Creek Local Fauna from North Central Utah. The Great Basin Naturalist, Vol.36, Number 4. Utah - General Gillette, D.D. (ed.)(1999). Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah. Utah Geological Survey, Miscellaneous Publication 99-1. (568 pages, 57.4MB download) Hintze, L.F. (1973). Geologic Road Logs of Western Utah and Eastern Nevada. Brigham Young University Geology Studies, Vol.20, Part 2. Studies for Students Number 7. Hintze, L.F. and F.D. Davis (2003). Geology of Millard County, Utah. Utah Geological Survey, Bulletin 133. (324 pages) (Thanks to piranha for pointing me to this one!) Milner, A.R.C. and S.Z. Spears (2007). Mesozoic and Cenozoic Paleoichnology of Southwestern Utah. Geological Society of America - Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting. Powell, D.K. (1958). The Geology of the Southern House Range, Millard County, Utah. Masters Thesis - Brigham Young University. Vermont Doll, C.G. (1984). Fossils from the Metamorphic Rocks of the Silurian-Devonian Magog Belt in Northern Vermont. Vermont Geology, Vol.3. Howe, J. (1993). A Brief Fossil History of Vermont. Knowlton, F.H. (1902). Notes on the Fossil fruits and Lignites of Brandon, Vermont. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club, Vol.29, Number 11. Landing, E., S.R. Westrop and L. Van Aller Hernick (2003). Uppermost Cambrian-Lower Ordovician Faunas and Laurentian Platform Sequence Stratigraphy, Eastern New York and Vermont. J.Paleont., 77(1). Mehrtens, C.J. and B. Selleck (2002). Middle Ordovician Section at Crown Point Peninsula. In: Guidebook for field trips in New York and Vermont. McClelland, J. and P. Karabinos (eds.), University of Vermont. Mehrtens, C.J. and A.C.H. Hadley (1995). Stratigraphy and Bedrock Geology of Parts of the St. Albans and Georgia Quadrangles, Northwestern Vermont. Vermont Geological Survey, Special Bulletin Number 14. Mehrtens, C.J. and M.A. Borre (1989). Stratigraphy and Bedrock Geology of Parts of the Colchester and Georgia Plains Quadrangles, Northwestern Vermont. Vermont Geological Survey, Special Bulletin Number 11. Stone, S.W. and J.G. Dennis (1964). The Geology of the Milton Quadrangle, Vermont. Vermont Geological Survey, Bulletin Number 26. Taylor, J.F., et al. (1991). Uppermost Cambrian Slope Deposits at Highgate Gorge, Vermont: A Minor Miscorrelation With Major Consequences for Conodont- and Trilobite-Based Chronocorrelation. J.Paleont., 65(5). Vermont Geological Survey (2007). Rockhounding in Vermont. Welby, C.W. (1962). Paleontology of the Champlain Basin in Vermont. Vermont Geological Survey, Special Publication Number 1. Virginia Virginia - Cambrian Orndorff, R.C., J.F. Taylor and R.W. Traut (1988). Uppermost Cambrian and Lowest Ordovician Conodont and Trilobite Biostratigraphy in Northwestern Virginia. Virginia Minerals, Vol.34, Number 2. Virginia - Ordovician Orndorff, R.C., J.F. Taylor and R.W. Traut (1988). Uppermost Cambrian and Lowest Ordovician Conodont and Trilobite Biostratigraphy in Northwestern Virginia. Virginia Minerals, Vol.34, Number 2. Springer, D.A. and R.K. Bambach (1985). Gradient versus cluster analysis of fossil assemblages: a comparison from the Ordovician of southwestern Virginia. Lethaia, Vol.18. Tomescu, A.M.F. (2004). Late Ordovician-Early Silurian Terrestrial Biotas of Virginia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania: An Investigation into the Early Colonization of Land. Ph.D. Dissertation - Ohio University. (284 pages) Virginia - Silurian Sartain, R.R. (1981). Stratigraphy and Conodont Paleontology of Late Silurian-Early Devonian Strata of Western Virginia. Masters Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. (154 pages) Tomescu, A.M.F. (2004). Late Ordovician-Early Silurian Terrestrial Biotas of Virginia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania: An Investigation into the Early Colonization of Land. Ph.D. Dissertation - Ohio University. (284 pages) Virginia - Devonian Sartain, R.R. (1981). Stratigraphy and Conodont Paleontology of Late Silurian-Early Devonian Strata of Western Virginia. Masters Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. (154 pages) Virginia - Carboniferous Read, C.B. (1955). Floras of the Pocono Formation and Price Sandstone in Parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. United States Geological Society Professional Paper 263. Virginia - Triassic Fraser, N.C., et al. (1996). A Triassic Lagerstätte from eastern North America. Nature (letters), Vol.380. Liutkus-Pierce, C.M., N.C. Fraser and A.B. Heckert (2014). Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and paleontology of the Upper Triassic Solite Quarry, North Carolina and Virginia. The Geological Society of America, Field Guide 35. Liutkus, C.M., et al. (2010). Use of fine-scale stratigraphy and chemostratigraphy to evaluate conditions of deposition and preservation of a Triassic Lagerstätte, south-central Virginia. J.Paleolimnol., 44. Virginia - Cretaceous Weems, R.E. and J.M. Bachman (2015). The Lower Cretaceous Patuxent Formation Ichnofauna of Virginia. Ichnos, 22. Virginia - Eocene Gildersleeve, B. (1942). Eocene of Virginia. Virginia Geological Survey, Bulletin 57. Weems, R.E. and G.J. Grimsley (eds.)(1999). Early Eocene Vertebrates and Plants from the Fisher/Sullivan Site (Nanjemoy Formation), Stafford County, Virginia. Virginia Division of Natural Resources, Publication 152. Virginia - Miocene Dooley, A.C. (2007). Barstovian (middle Miocene) Land Mammals from the Carmel Church Quarry, Caroline County, Virginia. Jeffersoniana, Number 18. Mansfield, W.C. (1929). New Fossil Mollusks from the Miocene of Virginia and North Carolina, With a Brief Outline of the Divisions of the Chesapeake Group. Proceedings of the U.S. National Museum, Vol.74, Article 14. Trochim, A.R. and A.C. Dooley (2010). Diatom biostratigraphy and paleoecology of vertebrate-bearing Miocene localities in Virginia. Jeffersoniana, Number 23. Weems, R.E. and R.A. George (2013). Amphibians and Nonmarine Turtles from the Miocene Calvert Formation of Delaware, Maryland and Virginia (USA). Journal of Paleontology, 87(4). Virginia - Pliocene Campbell, L.D. (1993). Pliocene Molluscs from the Yorktown and Chowan River Formations in Virginia. Virginia Division of Mineral Resources, Publication 127. (Thanks to doushantuo for finding this one!). Virginia - Pleistocene Hibbard, D.A. and F. Grady (2001). Melrose Caverns: A Late Pleistocene Vertebrate Locality in Virginia, U.S.A. Speleo Brazil, 2001. Ray, C.E., et al. (1968). Fossil Vertebrates from the Marine Pleistocene of Southeastern Virginia. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Vol.153, Number 3. Richards, H.G. and L. Campbell (1972). Additional Pleistocene Mollusks of Virginia. Virginia Minerals, Vol.18, Number 2. Virginia - General American Geophysical Union (1989). Tertiary Stratigraphy and Paleontology, Chesapeake Bay Region, Virginia and Maryland. Field Trip Guidebook T216, 28th International Geological Congress. Lea, H.C. (1846). Description of Some New Fossil Shells from the Tertiary of Petersburg, Va. Mixon, R.B. (ed.)(1989). Geology and Paleontology of the Haynesville Cores - Northeastern Virginia Coastal Plain. United States Geological Survey, Professional Paper 1489. Rader, E.K. (1964). Guide to Fossil Collecting in Virginia.Virginia Division of Mineral Resources, Information Circular 7 (Digital Reprint). Ward, L. W. and K. Kraft (eds.)(1984). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Outcropping Tertiary Beds in the Pamunkey River Region, Central Virginia Coastal Plain. Atlantic Coastal Plain Geological Association Guidebook for 1984 Field Trip. Weems, R.E. (1993). Stratigraphic Distribution and Bibliography of Fossil Fish, Amphibians and Reptiles from Virginia. United States Geological Survey, Open-File Report Number 93-222. Washington Archibald, S.B., et al. (2010). Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington): emergent communities in Early Eocene climates. GeoCanada 2010 - Working with the Earth. Bader, N.E., et al. (2016). A loess record of pre-Late Wisconsinan glacial outburst flooding, Pleistocene paleoenvironment, and Irvingtonian fauna from the Rulo site, southeastern Washington, USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 462. Goedert, J.L. and K.A. Campbell (1995). An Early Oligocene Chemosynthetic Community from the Makah Formation, Northwestern Olympic Peninsula, Washington. The Veliger, 38(1). Goedert, J.L. and R.L. Squires (1990). Eocene deep-sea communities in localized limestones formed by subduction-related methane seeps, southwestern Washington. Geology, Vol.18. Greenwood, D.R., et al. (2005). Fossil biotas from the Okanagan Highlands, southern British Columbia and northeastern Washington State: climates and ecosystems across an Eocene landscape. Can.J. Earth Sci., 42. Gustafson, E.P. (1978). The Vertebrate Faunas of the Pliocene Ringold Formation, South-Central Washington. Bulletin of the Museum of Natural History - University of Oregon, Number 23. (50.29MB download) Livingston, V.E. (1959). Fossils in Washington. Division of Mines and Geology, Information Circular Number 33. Mustoe, G.E., R.M. Dillhoff and T.A. Dillhoff (2007). Geology and paleontology of the early Tertiary Chuckanut Formation. The Geological Society of America Field Guide 9. Royse, C.F. (1965). Tertiary Plant Fossils from the Methow Valley, Washington. Northwest Science, Vol.39, Number 1. Smith, G.R., N. Morgan and E. Gustafson (2000). Fishes of the Mio-Pliocene Ringold Formation, Washington: Pliocene Capture of the Snake River by the Columbia River. University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, Number 32. Spencer, P.K. (1989). A Small Mammal Fauna from the Touchet Beds of Walla Walla County, Washington: Support for the Multiple-Flood Hypothesis. Northwest Science, Vol.63, Number 4. Squires, R.L. and J.L. Goedert (1994). Macropaleontology of the Eocene Crescent Formation in the Little River Area, Southern Olympic Peninsula, Washington.Contributions in Science, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Number 444. Squires, R.L., J.L. Goedert and K.L. Kaler (1992). Paleontology and Stratigraphy of Eocene Rocks at Pulali Point, Jefferson County, Eastern Olympic Peninsula, Washington. Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources, Report of Investigations 31. Strganac, C. (2011). Terrestrial mammal fossils from the Wildcat Creek Beds (Paleogene), Tieton River Area, south-central Washington, USA. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.14, Issue 3. Vallier, T.L. and H.C. Brooks (eds.)(1986). Geology of the Blue Mountains Region of Oregon, Idaho, and Washington. United States Geological Survey, Professional Paper 1435. Contains: Paleozoic and Mesozoic faunas of the Blue Mountains province: a review of their geologic implications and comments on papers in the volume. Late Triassic bivalves of the Martin Bridge Limestone, Hells Canyon, Oregon: taphonomy, paleoecology, paleozoogeography. Late Triassic coelenterate faunas of western Idaho and northeastern Oregon: implications for biostratigraphy and paleogeography. A Norian (Late Triassic) ichthyosaur from the Martin Bridge Limestone, Wallowa Mountains, Oregon. Jurassic ammonites and biostratigraphy of eastern Oregon and western Idaho. Conodont ages for limestones of eastern Oregon and their implications for pre-Tertiary melange terranes. Faunal affinities and tectonogenesis of Mesozoic rocks in the Blue Mountains province of eastern Oregon and western Idaho. Geologic implications of radiolarian-bearing Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks from the Blue Mountains province, eastern Oregon. Van Winkle-Palmer, K. (1918). Paleontology of the Oligocene of the Chehalis Valley, Washington. University of Washington Publications in Geology, Vol.1, Number 2. Weaver, C.H. and Van Winkle-Palmer, K. (1922). Fauna from the Eocene of Washington. University of Washington Publications in Geology, Vol.1, Number 3. West Virginia Busanus, J.W. (1974). Paleontology and Paleoecology of the Mauch Chunk Group in Northwestern West Virginia. Masters Thesis - Bowling Green State University. (226 pages) Haynes, J.T., K.E. Goggin and R.C. Orndorff (2015). Ordovician of Germany Valley, West Virginia. Stratigraphy, 12(2). Horvath, A.L. (1969). Relationships of Middle Silurian Strata in Ohio and West Virginia. The Ohio Journal of Science, Vol.69, Number 6. Martino, R.L. (1994). Facies analysis of Middle Pennsylvanian marine units, southern West Virginia. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 294. Martino, R.L., M.A. McCullough and T.L. Hamrick (1996). Stratigraphic and Depositional Framework of the Glenshaw Formation (Late Pennsylvanian) in Central Wayne County, West Virginia. Southeastern Geology, Vol.36, Number 2. Read, C.B. (1955). Floras of the Pocono Formation and Price Sandstone in Parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. U.S. Geological Society Professional Paper 263. Wisconsin Collette, J.H. and J.W. Hagadorn (2010). Three-Dimensionally Preserved Arthropods from Cambrian Lagerstätten of Quebec and Wisconsin. J.Paleont., 84(4). Day, F.H. (1877). On the Fauna of the Niagara and Upper Silurian Rocks as Exhibited in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, and in Counties Contiguous Thereto. Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. Driese, S.G., C.W. Byers and R.H. Dott (1981). Tidal Deposition in the Basal Upper Cambrian Mt. Simon Formation in Wisconsin. Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, Vol.51, Number 2. Klemic, H. and J.M. Ohlson (1973). Guidebook to the Geology and Mineral Deposits of the Central Part of Jackson County and Part of Clark County, Wisconsin. University of Wisconsin - Extension. Monroe, C.E. and E.E. Teller (1899). The Fauna of the Devonian Formation at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Journal of Geology, Vol.7, Number 3. Nehm, R.H. and B.E. Bemis (2002). Common Paleozoic Fossils of Wisconsin. Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, Educational Series 45. Ockerman, J.W. (1926). Fauna of the Galena Limestone Near Appleton. Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. Travis, J.W. (2009). Field Trip Guide Book: Geology of Brown and Door Counties, Wisconsin. America Institute of Professional Geologists. (99 pages) Wilson, L.R. (1932). The Two Creeks Forest Bed, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters. Winchell, A. (1864). Notice of a small collection of Fossils from the Potsdam Sandstone of Wisconsin and the Lake Superior Sandstone of Michigan. The American Journal of Science and Arts, Vol.XXXVII. Wyoming Wyoming - Cambrian Brett, C.E., W.D. Liddell and K.L. Derstler (1983). Late Cambrian hard substrate communities from Montana/Wyoming: the oldest known hardground encrusters. Lethaia, Vol.16. Schwimmer, R.D. (1973). The Middle-Cambrian Biostratigraphy of Montana and Wyoming. Ph.D. Dissertation - State University of New York at Stony Brook. (92.9MB download) Wyoming - Devonian Fiorillo, A.R. (2000). The Ancient Environment of the Beartooth Butte Formation (Devonian) in Wyoming and Montana: Combining Paleontological Inquiry with Federal Management Needs. In: Wilderness science in a time of change conference - Vol.3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-15-Vol.3. Mikesh, D.L. (1965). Correlation of Devonian Strata in Northwestern Wyoming. Masters Thesis - University of Iowa. Wyoming - Carboniferous Girty, G.H. (1910). The Fauna of the Phosphate Beds of the Park City Formation in Idaho, Wyoming and Utah. United States Geological Survey, Bulletin 436. Wyoming - Jurassic Ikejiri, T., P.S. Watkins and D.J. Gray (2006). Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, and Taphonomy of a Sauropod Quarry from the Upper Morrison Formation of Thermopolis, Central Wyoming. In: Paleontology and Geology of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. Foster, J.R. and Lucas, S.G. (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 36. Wilborn, B.K. (2001). Two New Dinosaur Bonebeds from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation, Bighorn Basin, WY: An Analysis of the Paleontology and Stratigraphy. Masters Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Wright, R.P. (1973). Marine Jurassic of Wyoming and South Dakota: Its Paleoenvironments and Paleobiogeography. Papers on Paleontology, Number 2. Wyoming - Cretaceous Demar, D.G. and B.H.Breithaupt (2006). The Nonmammalian Vertebrate Microfossil Assemblages of the Mesaverde Formation (Upper Cretaceous, Campanian) of the Wind River and Bighorn Basins, Wyoming. In: Late Cretaceous vertebrates from the Western Interior. (Lucas, S.G. and R.M.Sullivan, eds.) New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 35. Dorr, J.A. (1985). Newfound Early Cretaceous Dinosaurs and Other Fossils in Southeastern Idaho and Westernmost Wyoming. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.27, Number 3. Eicher, D.L. (1960). Stratigraphy and Micropaleontology of the Thermopolis Shale. Peabody Museum of Natural History - Yale University, Bulletin 15. Ostrom, J.H. (1970). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Cloverly Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of the Bighorn Basin Area, Wyoming and Montana. Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Bull. 55. Weeks, S.R. (2016). Depositional Model of a Late Cretaceous Dinosaur Fossil Concentration, Lance Formation. Masters Thesis - Loma Linda University. (125 pages) Wyoming - Paleocene Anemone, R.L. and W. Dirks (2009). An anachronistic Clarkforkian mammal fauna from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation (Great Divide Basin, Wyoming, USA). Geologica Acta, Vol.17, Numbers 1-2. Bown, T.M., et al. (1994). Distribution and Stratigraphic Correlation of Upper Paleocene and Lower Eocene Fossil Mammal and Plant Localities of the Fort Union, Willwood, and Tatman Formations, Southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1540. Gazin, C.L. (1969). A New Occurrence of Paleocene Mammals in the Evanston Formation, Southwestern Wyoming. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, Number 2. Gingerich, P.D. (2003). Mammalian responses to climate change at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary: Polecat Bench record in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 369. Gingerich, P.D. (2016). Paleocene faunal evolution at Polecat Bench in the northern Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, USA. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 54(3). Gingerich, P.D. (ed.) (2001). Paleocene - Eocene Stratigraphy and Biotic Change in the Bighorn and Clarks Fork Basins, Wyoming. University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, Number 33. Gingerich, P.D. (1983). Paleocene-Eocene Faunal Zones and a Preliminary Analysis of Laramide Structural Deformation in the Clark's Fork Basin, Wyoming. Wyoming Geological Association Guidebook. Gingerich, P.D. and T. Smith (2006). Paleocene-Eocene Land Mammals from Three New Latest Clarkforkian and Earliest Wasatchian Wash Sites at Polecat Bench in the Northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming.Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.31, Number 11. Gingerich, P.D. and W.C. Clyde (2001). Overview of Mammalian Biostratigraphy in the Paleocene-Eocene Fort Union and Willwood Formations of the Bighorn and Clarks Fork Basins. In: Paleocene-Eocene Stratigraphy and Biotic Change in the Bighorn and Clarks Fork Basins, Wyoming. Gingerich, P.D. (ed.), University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, 33. Gingerich, P.D. and K. Klitz (1985). Paleocene and early Eocene fossil localities in the Fort Union and Willwood Formations, Clarks Fork Basin, Wyoming (map). University of Michigan, Miscellaneous Papers, Number 61. Higgins, P. (2003). A Wyoming succession of Paleocene mammal-bearing localities bracketing the boundary between the Torrejonian and Tiffanian North American Land Mammal "Ages".Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol.38, Number 2. Holroyd, P.A. and B.D. Rankin (2014). Additions to the latest Paleocene Buckman Hollow local fauna, Chappo Member of the Wasatch Formation, Lincoln County, southwestern Wyoming. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.17, Issue 1. Secord, R. (2008). The Tiffanian Land-Mammal Age (Middle and Late Paleocene) in the Northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, Number 35. (60.5MB download) Secord, R., et al. (2006). Geochronology and Mammalian Biostratigraphy of Middle and Upper Paleocene Continental Strata, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. American Journal of Science, Vol.306. Wegemann, C.H. (1917). Wasatch Fossils in So-Called Fort Union Beds of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. United States Geological Survey, Professional Paper 108-D. Wilf, P., et al. (1998). Portrait of a Late Paleocene (Early Clarkforkian) Terrestrial Ecosystem: Big Multi Quarry and Associated Strata, Washakie Basin, Southwestern Wyoming. Palaios, Vol.13. Wyoming - Eocene Bown, T.M., et al. (1994). Distribution and Stratigraphic Correlation of Upper Paleocene and Lower Eocene Fossil Mammal and Plant Localities of the Fort Union, Willwood, and Tatman Formations, Southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1540. Delson, E. (1971). Fossil Mammals of the Early Wasatchian Powder River Local Fauna, Eocene of Northeast Wyoming.Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Volume 146: Article 4. Dorr, J.A. (1969). Mammalian and Other Fossils, Early Eocene Pass Peak Formation, Central Western Wyoming. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.22, Number 16. Gazin, C.L. (1958). The Geology and Vertebrate Paleontology of Upper Eocene Strata in the Northeastern Part of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. Part 2. The Mammalian Fauna of the Badwater Area. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Vol.131, Number 8. Gazin, C.L. (1952). The Lower Eocene Knight Formation of Western Wyoming and its Mammalian Faunas. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Contributions, Vol.117, Number 18. Gingerich, P.D. (ed.) (2001). Paleocene - Eocene Stratigraphy and Biotic Change in the Bighorn and Clarks Fork Basins, Wyoming. University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, Number 33. Gingerich, P.D. (1989). New Earliest Wasatchian Mammalian Fauna from the Eocene of Northwestern Wyoming: Composition and Diversity in a Rarely Sampled High-Floodplain Assemblage. Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Papers on Paleontology, Number 28. Gingerich, P.D. (1983). Paleocene-Eocene Faunal Zones and a Preliminary Analysis of Laramide Structural Deformation in the Clark's Fork Basin, Wyoming. Wyoming Geological Association Guidebook. Gingerich, P.D. and T. Smith (2006). Paleocene-Eocene Land Mammals from Three New Latest Clarkforkian and Earliest Wasatchian Wash Sites at Polecat Bench in the Northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming.Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.31, Number 11. Gingerich, P.D. and W.C. Clyde (2001). Overview of Mammalian Biostratigraphy in the Paleocene-Eocene Fort Union and Willwood Formations of the Bighorn and Clarks Fork Basins. In: Paleocene-Eocene Stratigraphy and Biotic Change in the Bighorn and Clarks Fork Basins, Wyoming. Gingerich, P.D. (ed.), University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, 33. Gingerich, P.D. and K. Klitz (1985). Paleocene and early Eocene fossil localities in the Fort Union and Willwood Formations, Clarks Fork Basin, Wyoming (map). University of Michigan, Miscellaneous Papers, Number 61. Grande, L. (1984). Paleontology of the Green River Formation, With a Review of the Fish Fauna. The Geological Survey of Wyoming, Bulletin 63. Gunnell, G.F. (1998). Mammalian Fauna from the Lower Bridger Formation (Bridger A, Early Middle Eocene) of the Southern Green River Basin, Wyoming. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.30, Number 3. Gunnell, G.F., et al. (1992). Wapiti Valley Faunas: Early and Middle Eocene Fossil Vertebrates from the North Fork of the Shoshone River, Park County, Wyoming. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.28, Number 11. Murphey, P.C. and T.S. Kelly (2017). Mammals from the earliest Uintan (middle Eocene) Turtle Bluff Member, Bridger Formation, southwestern Wyoming, USA, Part 2: Apatotheria, Lipotyphla, Carnivoramorpha, Condylarthra, Dinocerata, Perissodactyla and Artiodactyla. Palaeontologia Electronica, 20.1.29A. Murphey, P.C. and E. Evanoff (2011). Paleontology and Stratigraphy of the Middle Eocene Bridger Formation, Southern Green River Basin, Wyoming. Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Fossil Resources, Kemmerer, Wyoming. Murphey, P.C., et al. (2011). Paleontology and stratigraphy of middle Eocene rock units in the Bridger and Uinta Basins, Wyoming and Utah. The Geological Society of America, Field Guide 21. Roehler, H.W. (1973). Stratigraphy of the Washakie Formation in the Washakie Basin, Wyoming. United States Geological Survey Bulletin 1369. Rose, K.D., et al. (2012). Earliest Eocene Mammalian Fauna from the Paleocene - Eocene Thermal Maximum at Sand Creek Divide, Southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, Number 36. Simpson, G.G. (1959). Two New Records from the Bridger Middle Eocene of Tabernacle Butte, Wyoming. American Museum Novitates, Number 1966. Sinclair, W.J. and W. Granger (1911). Eocene and Oligocene of the Wind River and Bighorn Basins. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.XXX, Article VII. Textoris, D.A. (1963). Stratigraphy of the Green River Formation in the Bridger Basin, Wyoming. The Ohio Journal of Science, Vol.63, Number 6. West, R.M. and E.G. Atkins (1970). Additional Middle Eocene (Bridgerian) Mammals from Tabernacle Butte, Sublette County, Wyoming. American Museum Novitates, Number 2404. Wyoming - Oligocene Setoguchi, T. (1977). The Cedar Ridge Local Fauna (Late Oligocene) Badwater Creek Area, Central Wyoming: Paleontology and Geology of the Site. Ph.D. Dissertation - Texas Tech University. Sinclair, W.J. and W. Granger (1911). Eocene and Oligocene of the Wind River and Bighorn Basins. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.XXX, Article VII. Wyoming - General Dorr, J.A. and P.D. Gingerich (1980). Early Cenozoic mammalian paleontology, geologic structure, and tectonic history in the overthrust belt near LaBarge, western Wyoming. Contributions to Geology, Vol.18, Number 2. Emry, R.J. (1975). Revised Tertiary Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Western Beaver Divide, Fremont County, Wyoming. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, Number 25. Fortsch, D.E. and P.K. Link (1999). Regional Geology and Fossil Sites from Pocatello to Montpelier, Freedom and Wayan, Southeastern Idaho and Western Wyoming. In: Guidebook to the Geology of Eastern Idaho: Pocatello. Hughes, S.S. and G.D. Thackray (eds.), Idaho Museum of Natural History. Gingerich, P.D., K.D. Rose and D.W. Krause (1980). Early Cenozoic Mammalian Faunas of the Clark's Fork Basin - Polecat Bench Area, Northwestern Wyoming. University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, 24. Hager, M.W. (1970). Fossils of Wyoming. Wyoming Geological Survey, Bulletin 54. Love, J.D., M.C. McKenna and M.R. Dawson (1976). Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene Rocks and Vertebrate Fossils at the Emerald Lake Locality, 3 Miles South of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 932-A. Maertin, L. (2013). The Amateur Paleontologist: A Guide to Fossil Collecting in Park and Bighorn Counties of Wyoming. Masters Creative Project - Ball State University. McGrew, P.O. (1959). The Geology and Paleontology of the Elk Mountain and Tabernacle Butte Area, Wyoming.Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.117, Article 3. Oriel, S.S. and J.I. Tracey (1970). Uppermost Cretaceous and Tertiary Stratigraphy of Fossil Basin, Southwestern Wyoming. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 635. Van Houten, F.B. (1964). Tertiary Geology of the Beaver Rim Area, Fremont and Natrona Counties, Wyoming. United States Geological Survey Bulletin 1164. West, R.M. (1973). Geology and Mammalian Paleontology of the New Fork - Big Sandy Area, Sublette County, Wyoming. Fieldiana Geology, Vol.29. White, T.E. (1952). Preliminary Analysis of the Vertebrate Fossil Fauna of the Boysen Reservoir Area. Proceedings of the United States National Museum, Vol.102, Number 3296.
  13. Horn Coral

    Hi folks. I cleaned up the horn coral that I posted a pic of earlier. (was wondering if I could find it easily, then realized all I had to do was look for my watch. The missing Timex was much easier to spot. ) Here is pics of it. It is the largest of the many I have found here. Regards,
  14. Tooth ?

    Is this a toot, as I suspect. If it is, I would love opinions of what type. I found this, as well as several other specimens, in my yard after buying the house. I always thought they might have some importance, so I just kinda found a spot for them, and they stayed there until I got curious enough to look at them closely. This one photographs better than most of them. Can someone help me? It’s driving me crazy! LOL Thanks
  15. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  16. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  17. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  18. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  19. Heading to WV This Weekend

    We are heading down to Athens, WV this weekend to visit some friends who just moved there from the midwest. None of the four of us knows the area. Anyone have any suggestions for a reasonably short road trip to do some hunting in their vicinity?
  20. This is #8 and #9. Both were in the same split of shale. The larger one was barely visible, just 1/2 of the fwd center ridge. Took quite a bit of digging to expose it. I was pretty sure what it was, getting used to the little clues. Thanks again !
  21. Lost River - Spring 2017

    From my first true fossil excursion, Lost River WV. Most of the finds were shells and such, but a few anomalies turned up. So this is a part 'Fossil Hunting Trips' part 'Identify Help'. Sorry for the long thread, but the file sizes are too large. (One of the weirdest and most diverse of all of the finds was this.) ID Help... (These things were everywhere, but this was the most profound of them.)
  22. Trilo bit?

    I was prepping out a shell (it may seem stupid but I don't trust myself with other things) in a piece of matrix given to me by @Rocky Stoner (thx for the stones!) and this little dotted piece caught my eye. Could it be a frag of a trilobite, or is it the usual suspects. I am btw not referring to the obvious bryozoan, but the shiny piece with four holes.
  23. gastropod ? ammonite ? goniatite ?

    Hi again folks. There are sparsely scattered chunks of sandstone and other rock here. Today I found this one barely exposed at the surface. It was extremely difficult to break in two and is full of sparkles, like small quartz flakes. It is not the normal sandstone. There appears to be a section of a crinoid and a spiral gastropod of sorts. I found no reference to it in the link posted above and have not seen another one here. Looks like it may be an "open" tapered coil where the coils do not touch one another, not sure though. Something new here every day .... never a dull moment. (unless I'm boring you with the same ol same ol) Kind regards.
  24. Orthoceras find

    Hi folks, Rocky again. We had a nice shower this eve., walked the yellow shale plowed area and found these tidbits rinsed off. The longer one is the best orthoceras segment that I've found here so far. Also found the delicate little arrowhead. But as usual, it is broken. This is the first rain since the tilling. I'm hopeful (and confident) that more will pop up after several more rains and another tilling ... or 2. Kind regards.
  25. Echinoid coral ?

    Hi folks, 1 item here for ID. It is a beautiful half bagel shape with the surface made up of polygons. A portion of a smaller one to the side. I searched it a bit and determined Echinoid coral, but found no illustrations resembling this one. I wetted it slightly for the pic to enhance the details. Please verify. Thanks.
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