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Found 17 results

  1. ThePhysicist

    Carcharodon hubbelli

    From the album: Sharks

    White sharks used to have smooth-edged teeth. They eventually evolved serrations as their diets transitioned to marine mammals from fish. This shark was a transitional form between the smooth-edged predecessors and the modern fully-serrated great white. The serrations on this tooth are not worn-down. C. hubbelli serrations are naturally finer, typically decrease in size towards the tip, and are oriented towards the tip. This tooth is from the desert of northern Chile. Fossils from Chile are now illegal to export, so as an ethical collector you need to make sure that any Chilean fos
  2. ThePhysicist

    Great white shark tooth

    From the album: Sharks

    One of the most coveted teeth due to the great white's popularity. Being one of my favorite animals, I knew I had to get a nice one eventually. This one in particular is special. Besides being in superb condition, this tooth has a bite mark on the root: three parallel grooves on the labial side of the root gouged by serrations. Bite marks on teeth are uncommon, and a neat feature on this already sweet tooth. This tooth is from the desert of northern Chile. Fossils from Chile are now illegal to export, so as an ethical collector you need to make sure that any Chilean f
  3. ThePhysicist

    Carcharodon hastalis

    From the album: Sharks

    For a while these teeth were called "makos," but we now know these teeth belonged to old white sharks, sharks that were the predecessors of the modern great white.
  4. Chabba

    Topsail, NC shark tooth

    Hi Folks, Been a reader of these boards for a long time and appreciate all of the great info shared here. I found this tooth at Topsail beach in NC this past summer and was hoping for some help with the ID. It not in great shape but leaning towards one of the extinct white sharks. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
  5. ThePhysicist

    Carcharodon hastalis (broad-form)

    From the album: Sharks

    Upper teeth from an extinct white shark Hawthorne Fm., St. Mary's River, GA, USA Left 2 9/16" slant height, right 2 5/8" slant height
  6. ThePhysicist

    Carcharodon hastalis (narrow-form)

    From the album: Sharks

    Narrow variant of the white shark, C. hastalis.
  7. Hi - I found this tooth on the tidal flats in Brewster in cape cod bay a few years ago and was wondering the exact same thing.
  8. Are these from the same or different sharks? Would love an ID and age. Found washed up on beach in Isle of Palms SC Thank you
  9. Same teeth different side. Messed up somehow. Sorry Isle of Palms SC beach find
  10. Hello - new member here. I found this great white tooth on Cape Cod recently and it was identified as a White Shark tooth by a local natural history curator, but they didn't think it was fossilized. Any ideas? To me it looked very similar to fossilized teeth I looked up online. When I first pulled it out of the water it was a little more grey/blue/black but once it dried it went this tan/brown color. We have an explosion of Great Whites here recently, but is this fossilized?
  11. Our final stop in the Shark program is of course the giant Sharks of the Miocene. We wrap our adventure through the timeline of shark evolution by giving the kids what they expect to see, big shark teeth. Truthfully, we do not have many large shark teeth. I went for interesting teeth not big teeth but we have a few that will grab the kids attention. We give a very brief introduction to the giant sharks with a 2 inch Otodus tooth. We can spend too much time on Otodus or the ancestors of Megalodon as it just do not have time ( plus we do not have teeth from Auriculatus, Angustidens, or Chubutens
  12. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharodon hastalis

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharodon hastalis Atacama Desert, Chile

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  13. Realized this while talking to a buddy who doesn't know much about FL fossils, since (almost) everyone can agree Cosmopolitodus/Carcharodon hastalis was much more related (I mean ancestral) to the modern great white rather than modern mako's, shouldn't we be calling them "white sharks" instead of "mako's"? By not saying "great" imo you clearly don't mean Carcharodon carcharias & iirc paleontologists only though they were ancestors of modern mako's because they had no serrations.. sorry if this is a rhetorical question, but I couldn't hold it in any longer.
  14. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    A Short Trip ... to the Movie Theater ?

    Hello everyone .... sometimes shark teeth turn up in the most unusual places. My son and I went out for a movie at the local AMC theater in Savannah, GA to see Peter Rabbit. While we waited for our ride my son and I tooled around the parking lot picking up the usual suspects ... rocks and acorns oh my ! He commented about the large oyster shells in the mix and I said .. yeah, oyster shells can be pretty common and cheap, they dredge them up from the bottom of the ocean. Look, see these quartz pebbles they come from the same spot. Wait ----> is that a
  15. Hey all, im posting this in hopes some of you shark folks may be able to help me out. I have a shark tooth in a concretion from the west coast. I have decided im going to prep this one myself and leave a backing of matrix on the ventral side of the tooth. So my question is, is it possible to tell the ventral/dorsal from what little is exposed already. This is probably a carcharodon sp. tooth but i really wont be sure until i am able to prep it. I have compared this tooth to some megs and white shark teeth i have in my collection and im kind of leaning in one direction already but i really don'
  16. I have some white shark tooth for trade! These are all from South Korea, and obviously real. I want unprepared things like crab, trilobite or mammalian fossils. (And I live in South Korea, then we have to use international shipping.)
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