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  1. Ludwigia

    Mioplosus labracoides (Cope 1877)

    From the album: Pisces

    37cm. long. Eocene (Ypresian/Lutetian). Green River Formation. 18" layer. Found at Stone Fossils Quarry, Lincoln County, Wyoming. Acquired from Kris (Ptychodus04).
  2. gturner333

    Is this an ankylosaur tooth?

    I found this in some matrix from the Lance Formation in Wyoming and wondered if it is an ankylosaur tooth. The hash marks are 1mm. Thanks for any help.
  3. Robert Mahorney

    Diplomystus green river formation Wyoming

    Diplomystus green river formation Wyoming. herring fish fossil lake Gosiute Eocene
  4. oilshale

    Asineops squamifrons COPE, 1870

    Asineops (Greek for "donkey-faced") squamifrons was first described by Cope as having an affinity to the pirat perch family. Later, with more detailed study, this species was found to lack the diagnostic characters of that family. Thus it is not yet clearly assignable to order. Although this species is much rarer in the Fossil Lake sediments than in Lake Gosiute deposits, the specimens from Fossil Lake are much larger than those from Lake Gosiute. Reference: Edward D. Cope (1870): Observations on the Fishes of the Tertiary Shales of Green Nov. River, Wyoming Territory. Proc. A
  5. I'll be honest, I've put off writing this trip report for far too long. Between work, school and general procrastination I have delayed this post for over 7 months. Perhaps there's a silver lining to me writing this in the middle of winter, it could act as a nice break from the grey & cold conditions many of us are facing this season. Hopefully you all enjoy a dose of warmth from a trip which I enjoyed greatly. Ok ready? Let's go. My morning started around 4:30, ungodly hours for me generally, but I woke up excited for what lay ahead. Less than a half hour later we were on our w
  6. giftedsifrhippus

    Basal Perissodactyl Mandibular M1-2

    This partial mandible was found on private land in the Willwood Formation of the Bighorn Basin. It is likely a right M1 and partial M2. I've been able to identifying it down to Perissodactyla indet. but cannot go further. I'm leaning towards something like Cardiolophus but I'm not sure. Would appreciate any help.
  7. Mickeyb06

    Lance Formation potential claw

    Hello, my name is Michael and I'm from New Hampshire. This past summer I was hunting with PaleoProspectors in Wyoming with my best friend @PaleoNoel in mostly the White River and Lance formation. One day in the Lance formation we found what appears to be a piece of claw from an Ornithomimid. It looks like the leftmost claw of the foot with a gradual curve and a large groove running down the side possibly due to erosion. I'd love to hear if anybody has any ideas on what this could be and I'd greatly appreciate an ID. The width is 1.7 cm at the base and 1.0 cm at the top. It is 2.6 cm long.
  8. PaleoNoel

    Another Lance fm. Tooth

    This past summer's trip to Wyoming provided no shortage of interesting and bizarre finds. This tooth was found at a channel deposit in the Lance fm. and is about 5 mm in length and 2 mm in width. It appears to be a theropod tooth based on the overall morphology, but lacks serrations unlike the all the non avian theropods in the formation. I'm not sure if the serrations were worn off or were never there in the first place. Or perhaps based on the small size it belonged to a young individual with developing teeth. The theropod it most closely resembles in my opinion is Richardoestesia, as it's o
  9. PaleoNoel

    Lance fm. Potential Varanoid Tooth?

    Hi everyone, I found this small tooth over the summer in a Lance formation channel deposit in Wyoming. In the field I didn't know what to make of it, too recurved and compressed to be croc, no visible serrations either so probably not a non avian theropod. Months later I took a closer look at it and continued to search for its potential identity. I thought to myself could it be a mammal canine. After some online browsing I couldn't find a match for anything in the Hell Creek/Lance fauna. However, after posting it on an instagram story, I got a few suggestions. One of the more intriguing of tho
  10. PaleoNoel

    Odd Lance fm. Vertebra

    I found this odd vertebra in Wyoming's Lance fm. over the summer. I was told by a guide that it may be a turtle cervical vertebra, but I wanted to see what other forum members thought. It's about 1.5 cm long and around 1.3 cm in width.
  11. ClearLake

    Wyoming Cretaceous Bivalve

    A while back I collected a group of bivalves from the Frontier Formation (Cretaceous) just south of Kemmerer (Lincoln County) Wyoming and I am having some trouble pinning down an ID. The formation is known for containing Crassostrea soleniscus and Inoceramus, but these are neither of those. Based on my Texas Cretaceous Bivalves book, they could be some species of Panopea but I am not at all certain of that. Unfortunately, although I have quite a number of samples, there aren't any that expose the dentition so that is a bit of a disadvantage. I'm hoping one of our Wyoming experts and/or b
  12. I found this in 1989 on the upper Powder River in Wyoming. It was in an area with lots of these baculite-shaped things. I thought it would make a great knife handle so that's what I did. However, I've never seen anything like it. It has the general shape of a baculite but the exterior seems to be covered by something. I get the "sense" of a type of sea weed, or a jelly fish or something, but I doubt very seriously something soft like that could fossilize. So I am looking for an expert to tell me what I have. Also interesting, is different aspects of the "raised" features are different c
  13. Gregory Kruse

    Wyoming Baculite Identification Help

    Hello, Last week, I found this baculite eroding out of a concretion in Casper, WY along the recreational bike path. The shale erodes out of the hillside and is presumably part of the Cretaceous Cody Fm. Can someone help me verify and identify this baculite? Are there any references to the stratigraphy and or fossil assemblages in the Casper area? Sorry for the poor photo quality. Thank you!
  14. Fossildude19

    Diplomystus dentatus

    From the album: Fossildude's Purchased/Gift Fossils

    A beautiful Diplomystus dentatus from the Green River Formation, Wyoming. This was a gift from my entirely too generous, good friend, Jeffrey P.

    © 2021 T.Jones

  15. PaleoNoel

    Parasaniwa Tooth

    Happy New Year everyone. Tonight I thought I might post a fossil whose identity I wanted to confirm. I found it in Wyoming's Lance formation this summer and someone told me it might be a Pachycephalosaur premaxillary tooth because of it's carinae and ridges at the base. However after comparing my tooth to examples I could find online I felt that this ID was incorrect. Eventually I looked back over one of @Troodon's threads and found a jaw labelled as parasaniwa and those teeth matched what I had found. My tooth is about 6 mm long and about 3 mm wide.
  16. PaleoNoel

    Potential Ankylosaurian Osteoderm

    I found this interestingly pitted piece of bone in Wyoming's Lance formation over the summer and my initial thoughts were ankylosaurian osteoderm. I've been wrong in the past with various Ceratopsid skull elements deceiving me, but I am hopeful to add this to my comparatively short list of remains from these living tanks. I'd appreciate any feedback from my fellow forum members. Dimensions are about 8 cm in length, 5 cm in width, ~3 cm in depth.
  17. Hello! This is a very worn, very eroded ornithischian vertebra from the Lance Formation of Wyoming. It was in three pieces that I recently glued back together, I found all the pieces wrapped in foil together in the box I brought back from the trip. It’s from my trip there this summer, though I don’t remember collecting this specific bone. My immediate thought based on size and shape is Thescelosaurus, though I have seen some small Hadrosaur verts that look kind of like this one. I just hope it isn’t too worn/eroded that no guesses at an ID can be made!
  18. Winter Hobby

    Diplomystus

    My latest completion. I like this one but still prefer the Mioplosus. I'm looking for a Priscacara next. Maybe Santa will bring me a fossil for Christmas!
  19. thelivingdead531

    Wyoming State Museum

    Yesterday we decided to get out a bit for the first time in months and go to the Wyoming State Museum. We were the only visitors so we had the museum to ourselves, which was pretty nice. It houses a rich history of Native Americans, wildlife, mining, military, and fossils. I'm only going to post the fossil related photos though.
  20. PaleoNoel

    Dermal Denticle? Lance fm. Wyoming

    Hi everyone. I found this little fossil recently while working through a sandy conglomerate matrix I brought back from this summer's hunt in Wyoming's Lance fm. I believe it's a dermal denticle from some variety of cartilaginous fish, my first guess would be the Hybodont shark Lonchidion, but the guitarfish Myledaphus is also incredibly common in these sediments, however I haven't seen any pictures of denticles belonging to the latter or close relatives. It's about 2 mm long and about 1.5 mm tall. I would love to hear some input. Thanks, Noel
  21. Osteology of the late triassic archosaur Heptasuchus is presented in this paper https://peerj.com/articles/10101/
  22. Roby

    Mioplosus labracoides

    This Mio was pulled from the wall while collecting with a friend where all finds were split between the two of us. In November I prepped it. Added others from American Fossil in 2017 and 2018. Lit.: John A. Whitlock, 2010. Phylogenetic relationships of the Eocene percomorph fishes Priscacara and Mioplosus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 30(4):1037–1048, July 2010 by the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. Lance Grande, 2013. The Lost World of Fossil Lake: Snapshots from Deep Time. Edition: 1 Publisher: University of Chicago Press. ISBN: 13: 978-0-226-92296-6.
  23. Winter Hobby

    Removing hard matrix

    I dug this up in Wyoming and was told it's a Mioplosus. The soft sandstone came off with only a bit of effort. Now I'm on to a harder crystalized matrix around the most delicate areas. I don't want to lose any of the carbon so I'm asking for help. I've used dental tools and pen razors so far. I see amazing, beautifully completed fossils on this site with no sandstone on them at all. Is there a method or tool I am unaware of?
  24. Top Trilo

    Knightia or Diplomystus?

    I bought this prepare your own fossil fish either knightia or diplomystus so I could prepare something for the first time which is why it looks like this don’t judge. I was wondering two things actually, one is it a knightia or diplo? And two are all green river fish this hard? I know I didn’t do a good prep job but was the fish poorly preserved as well? It was paper thin in some places and the fish doesn’t look whole it looks like its bones got moved after it died. Oh it’s also about 3 inches from the mouth to the “end” of the tail
  25. Hello all, I have been long searching for an exceptionally high/museum quality aspiration example from Green River. I recently have found myself with the opportunity to acquire this specimen. I've been told that there is a small amount of restoration on the tail of the Priscacara but I don't know exactly how much/what it entails yet. I'd ideally prefer a specimen with 0% restoration but I don't know how realistic that is. For scale, the diplo is 18" long, I'm told. It's obviously pretty cool that this is a Priscacara aspiration as my understanding is that this is pretty uncommon.
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