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  1. The Green River Formation is one of the most well-known fossil sites in the world, occupying present-day Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. This Lagerstätte has been noted for its well-preserved fish fossils, as well as numerous invertebrates, plants, and sometimes even reptiles and birds. Green River fossils are Eocene-aged, at 53.5 to 48.5 million years old. Thankfully, not only are Green River fossils attractive, they also remain affordable to the casual collector. Allow me to present my humble collection. Crocodile tooth Borealosuchus sp. Southwest Wyoming
  2. The title says it all. It’s a nice tooth, but I’m going back and forth on it because the telltale wear patterns for either group are not present as far as I can see. I apologize for the poor quality of my camera phone picture.
  3. acetabular

    Horse Metapodial

    A presumed horse metapodial from the Eocene sediments of the Big Horn Basin (Wyoming). Post some other things from here as well, but was wondering if anyone could narrow down this ID. Thanks!
  4. jnicholes

    Weird Coprolite ID

    So, I was going through my fossils from my last trip to Kemmerer Wyoming. One of them accidentally split, revealing this. It looks like a kind of Coprolite, but I’m not sure. It’s got scales in it, but it’s too flat to be regular Coprolite. I suspect it is stingray Coprolite, as the people there told us to watch out for it, because they have been finding a lot. Can someone help me ID this? Jared
  5. Two limb bone fragments from the Eocene deposits in the Big Horn Basin. Mammalian, but don't know anything more beyond that. Would really appreciate help!
  6. Praefectus

    REMPC-AC0003 Phareodus testis

    From the album: Prae's Collection (REMPC)

    Phareodus testis Eocene Green River Formation Kemmerer, Wyoming, USA
  7. Three New Species of Primitive Ungulate Ancestors Identified from Wyoming University of Colorado Boulder , Sci News, Aug 18, 2021 Post-Jurassic Fossils Uncovered By CU Boulder Scientists Danielle Chavira, Channel 4, CBS, University of Colorado Boulder, August 18, 2021 The paper is: Atteberry, M.R. and Eberle, J.J., 2021. New earliest Paleocene (Puercan) periptychid ‘condylarths’ from the Great Divide Basin, Wyoming, USA. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, pp.1-29. Yours, Paul H.
  8. I was recently out vacationing in Wyoming and spent Saturday morning (7/24/21) hunting in the badlands. As I sat down to rest for a moment, I looked down and saw what I thought were a radius/ulna pair from a small mammal. Upon closer inspection, it was a pair of lower jaws freshly exposed on the edge of a nodule and on the backside, a small skull. Needless to say, I was ecstatic. I spent a bit of time making sure the specimen was consolidated (Paleobond Penetrant, wish I had brought some 4417) and packed it up for the trip home. I was thinking it woul
  9. UW’s Vietti Leads Student Expedition into Four Kemmerer Fossil Fish Quarries By Aaronm Brown Wyoming News Now, August 111, 2021 UW’s expedition into four Kemmerer fossil fish quarries to air on PBS Rocket Miner, August 11, 2021 UW’s Vietti Leads Student Expedition into Four Kemmerer Fossil Fish Quarries University of Wyoming Yours, Paul H,
  10. ZacMan77

    Red Desert Find

    Hello, and thank you for taking the time to have a look at these fossils I've come across recently. I live in the Red Desert of Wyoming and these weren't too far from where I live. Very unique, haven't seen quartz veins like this in fossilized wood aside from some small examples here and there. The other I do believe to be bone, possibly a vertebrae? Also think it may have had opal included in its mineral replacement. There's an area on it exposed to and shows impressive mineralization. Your professional input is greatly appreciated! Again, thank you!
  11. Given the success I had in the White River fm. the week before, my third and final outing of the summer was just icing on the cake to an already phenomenal fossil hunting session. But what I would come to find is that this figurative cake would be getting a massive dose of that sugary goodness, and man it felt sweet. This time around I would be joined by my best friend Michael (@Mickeyb06)who would be taking on his first ever fossil hunting adventure in Wyoming's Lance fm. While it wasn't my intention for this to be his first experience in the field, we made the most of it and it was gre
  12. Day 5 in South Dakota was a total bust for my son and me. The section of the quarry we worked has large ironstone and clay boulders, but also has large bones. We sat next to a jacketed femur and worked back the wall face. We didnt find more than a few small bits at the end of the day, but I said that something big was there. Big rocks = big bones. Sure enough, Walter sat down in our spot 3 days later and immediately uncovered a ceratopsian dentary! By this point were were already on to our next destination in Kemmerer, Wyoming. 3 days of splitting shale for fish, hoping for th
  13. What a trip my son and I had this year! We started out in the Hell Creek fm of South Dakota. This was a special trip through Paleo Adventures for his "veteran" guests who have already spent a few years with him and could operate without supervision. We started out hunting a new ranch. This property is virgin ground with LOTS of acreage that needed exploration. The group was split into 3 teams, each taking a different area. Our team was further split into pairs. So, it was my son and me, exploring for new outcrops. The sun was intense, the temperature hot, and hours of hiking and sta
  14. With a week of collecting under my belt I felt ready and excited to take on the next, this time exclusively on the White River formation. All factors being considered, the White River is probably the most difficult formation to hunt among those I've been lucky enough to explore thus far. For one, the terrain is often very rough, with all sorts of ridges, rises, washes and gullies to hike through. Another issue to account for is the reflection of light off of the white sediments, meaning that ample sunscreen is a necessity if you don't want to burn to a crisp. That harsh sunlight can lead to te
  15. I thought I'd try my hand with this Kemmerer Cockerellites liops this time around. This took me a looooong time because of the fine differences in shading, but I'm pretty happy with it. As you can see when compare to the original photo, I cheated a bit on it by filling in the missing parts of the fins.
  16. Fossilis Willis

    good times in the badlands

    Earlier this month @JD3B and I went a incredible fossil hunting road trip. The title may be a bit misleading, as only one day was actually spent in the badlands. There were however, plenty of good times. We were lucky to have the opportunity to visit a few storied formations, and even luckier to have a couple tff legends to guide us. The first morning was an early one with a 3:00 am wake up. I was at Jacob's (JD3B) by 4:00 and on the road before 5:00. First stop, the Helena, Montana area to visit the world renowned @RJB museum of natural history. We arrived late in the afternoon an
  17. PaleoNoel

    Avisaurus tooth

    From the album: Lance fm. Microsite Finds

    I found this tooth while looking through matrix from a productive conglomerate site while at home. At first I had no clue what it could be, but the consensus on its ID thread was that likely belonged to Avisaurus. While its hard to conceptualize birds with teeth from our modern perspective, that was the norm for many genera in the Cretaceous. Glad to have found this one and recognize it as a tooth.
  18. PaleoNoel

    Pectinodon tooth

    From the album: Lance fm. Microsite Finds

    Another shot of the Pectinodon tooth featured earlier in this album, this specimen was found by my dad and is one of two Troodontid teeth in my collection.
  19. PaleoNoel

    Leptoceratops tooth

    From the album: Lance fm. Microsite Finds

    While far less famous than its horned and frilled relatives, Leptoceratops were interesting small herbivores in their own right, likely utilizing their deep set jaws as a deterrent for predators. So far this is the only tooth from this genus I've found so far.
  20. PaleoNoel

    Bivalve

    From the album: Lance fm. Microsite Finds

    Most people think of dinosaurs when they hear Lance formation, but I've found that in many of its channel deposits, freshwater mollusks are incredibly common, like this bivalve.
  21. PaleoNoel

    Coprolite

    From the album: Lance fm. Microsite Finds

    My first definitive coprolite from Wyoming, could belong to any assortment of animals so I won't slap a label on it to avoid being inaccurate.
  22. Hi everyone! Recently I bought this piece of blue petrified wood. In the process of cleaning, I have soak the whole piece in muriatic acid for about a day and half, and in water with baking soda for about 2 days to neutralize the acid. To my surprise the whole skin turn white and the dark blue part has turned much pale in color. I have attached a few photos below for your reference, please noted that when the whole piece is dry the white part is complete white and opaque, but when I added water, the white part became translucent. I am not sure if I have somehow damage i
  23. Seanrad09

    Lance Form. find, ceratopsian?

    Found this three years back in the Lance Formation. About 50 miles out of Newcastle, WY on a dig trip. Going through some bones I haven’t tried to ID. Any suggestions on this one? It has nice bone surface in a few spots, but isn’t familiar to me.
  24. Hi everyone, I'm hoping to be able to find out the identity of this tooth I found in the White River formation last summer. It has an odd triangular cross section and doesn't seem to match anything I've seen so far. I was wondering if it might be from the ancient peccary Perchoerus as I saw some similarities online when I was exploring that option. I would be interested in reading all of your opinions. The tooth is approx. 4 cm in length and 1 cm at its widest point. Photo from the field
  25. PaleoNoel

    Micro Claw-Lance fm.

    Hi everyone! I came across this little piece as I was sorting through some of the anthill matrix I brought back from Wyoming's Lance formation. When I first found it, I must not have recognized it as a partial claw as it ended up alongside other odds and ends (fragments of bone, gar scales & other misc. fossils) at the bottom of a pill bottle where I had deposited all of my pickings. This week, however, I emptied that pill bottle to see what was inside in order to organize all the micros I found from this locality (which will get its own post eventually). It's evident to me that this is a
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