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Found 25 results

  1. The winner of the 2017 vertebrate fossil of the year goes to... @jcbshark's incredible Giant Tortoise (Hesperotestudo) Foot and Associated Osteoderms from the Pleistocene of Sarasota County, Florida! This was a hard fought contest with a lot of incredible fossils, but this emerged the clear winner after well over 100 members cast their votes. Congratulations @jcbshark!
  2. Here we have the winner of the 2017 invertebrate fossil of the year: @FossilDudeCO's Damselfly from the Eocene Green River Formation of Lincoln County, Wyoming! This fossil represents not just a new species, not just a new genus, but an entirely new family of damselfly. This little beauty managed to get over half of all the votes in a contest with 12 incredible invertebrate fossils. Congratulations @FossilDudeCO!
  3. Here we are with our 2017 IPFOTY contest entries. These are all 12 of our month's invertebrate / plant winners, listed in order from the month they won. Carefully review the options and vote for the entry you think deserves to win the title of the 2017 Invertebrate / Plant Fossil of the Year! Polls close on the 26th of January. You can also vote on the 2017 Vertebrate Fossil of the Year contest HERE. 1. Aphelecrinus randolphensis, Pulaskicrinus campanulus, and Phanocrinus bellulus crinoids - Upper Mississippian (Middle Chesterian) Lower Bangor Limestone - Alabama, USA 2. Spathites puercoensis ammonite - Upper Cretaceous Carlile Shale - New Mexico, USA 3. Thylacocephala Arthropod (Convexicaris mazonensis) - Carbondale Formation - Illinois, USA 4. Sinespinaspis markhami Trilobite - Silurian Cotton Formation - Forbes, NSW, Australia 5. Bellacartwrightia whitelyi Trilobite - Middle Devonian Moscow Formation - New York, USA 6. Tealliocaris woodwardi Multiblock - Lower Carboniferous Gullane Formation - East Lothian, Scotland, USA 7. Damselfly - Eocene Green River Formation - Lincoln County, Wyoming, USA 8. Astrocystites with associated Paleocrinus or Carabocrinus - Bobcaygeon Formation - Ontario, Canada 9. Cornuella cf. ornata Cyrtoconic Nautiloid - Carboniferous, Mississippian, Brigantian substage - County Durham, UK 10. Eldredgeops iowensis southworthi trilobite - Devonian Widder Formation - Hungry Hollow, Ontario, Canada 11. Crinoid - Ordovician Bobcaygeon Formation - Ontario, Canada 12. Undescribed Jacksonechinus sp. Sea Urchin - Upper Carboniferous - Kasimov Town, Ryazan region, Russia
  4. Here we are with our 2017 VFOTY contest entries. These are all 12 of our month's vertebrate winners, listed in order from the month they won. Carefully review the options and vote for the entry you think deserves to win the title of the 2017 Vertebrate Fossil of the Year! Poll closes on the 26th of January. You can also vote on the 2017 Invertebrate / Plant Fossil of the Year contest HERE. 1. Allodesmus kernensis mandible with an upper incisor and a cetacean vertebra - Middle Miocene Round Mountain Silt - California, USA 2. Partial Porpoise/Dolphin Skeleton - Miocene Calvert Formation - Central Virginia, USA 3. Legless Amphibian (Phlegethontia longissima) - Carbondale Formation - Illinois, USA 4. Diplurus newarki Coelacanth - Late Triassic Lockatong Formation - North Bergen, New Jersey, USA 5. Sloth Claw and Associated Phalanx - Pleistocene - Southwest Florida, USA 6. Oreodont and Possible Daphoenus - Eocene-Oligocene White River Formation - Lusk, Wyoming, USA 7. Pachyrhizodus marathonensis Fish - Cretaceous Toolebuc Formation - Queensland, Australia 8. Associated Ichthyosaur Bones - Lower Jurassic - Kromer Quarry, Germany 9. Didelphodon sp. Left Dentary - Late Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation - Butte County, South Dakota, USA 10. Hesperotestudo (Giant Tortoise) Foot and Associated Osteoderms - Pleistocene - Sarasota County, Florida, USA 11. Crocodile (Pallimnarchus pollens) Jaw - Plio-Pleistocene - Australia 12. Poebrotherium Camel Jaw - Oligocene White River Formation - Chadron, Nebraska, USA
  5. Thanks to contacts made by FF Member Megaholic (Chuck), this guy will soon be on it's way to the Department of Invertebrate Paleontology at the University of Florida at Gainesville in response to their request to have it for analysis and display. . Abertella dengleri Echinoid- Late Miocene, Peace River Formation - Hardee County, Florida, USA Thanks Chuck for making that connection for me.
  6. Peace river unknown

    This little molar (or pre-molar) is the only other item I found on my Dec 19th trip to the Peace. It's pretty worn down, but I was hoping someone could make an ID for me. Thanks for the time.
  7. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends October 6th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE. 1. Greenops Trilobite - Devonian Windom Shale - Hamburg New York 2. Devonalosia wrightorum Brachiopod - Mid-Devonian Arkona Formation - Ontario, Canada 3. Limestone w/ Various Marine Fossils - Devonian Licking Creek Member - Monterey, VA 4. Isorophusella incondite Edrioasteroid - Ordovician Bobcaygeon Formation - Brechin, Ontario, Canada 5. Tornoceras uniangulare Goniatite - Mid-Devonian Widder Formation - Arkona, Ontario, Canada 6. Cornuella cf. ornata Cyrtoconic Nautiloid - Carboniferous, Mississippian, Brigantian substage - County Durham, UK 7. Sphaerulites foliaceus Rudist - Late Cretaceous - Port des Barques, France
  8. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends October 6th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE. 1. Pallimnarchus pollens Crocodile Jaw - Pleistocene - Australia 2. Carcharocles megalodon Shark Tooth - Middle Miocene Hawthorn Group - Florida 3. Cetacean Tooth - Middle Miocene Hawthorn Group - Florida 4. Didelphodon sp. Left Dentary - Late Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation - Butte County, South Dakota 5. Palaeoxyris sp. Shark Egg Capsule - Pennsylvanian Dugger Formation - Vigo County, Indiana 6. Cockerellites sp. Fish - Eocene Green River Formation - Lincoln County, Wyoming
  9. The winner of our August 2017 IPFOTM goes to...The Astrocystites with associated Paleocrinus or Carabocrinus from the Bobcaygeon Formation of Ontario, Canada! Congrats to @Malcolmt on the win!
  10. The winner of our August 2017 VFOTM goes to...The Associated Ichthyosaur Bones from the Lower Jurassic of Kromer Quarry, Germany! Congrats to @belemniten on the win and @Ludwigia for the wonderful preparation job!
  11. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends September 6th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE. 1. Great Keyhole Limpet (Megathura crenulata) - Pliocene Santa Margarita Formation - San Luis Obispo County, California 2. Unidentified Insect - Miocene - Paraćin, Serbia 3. Tongue Shells (Glossus sp.) - Miocene Choptank Formation - Calvert County, Maryland 4. Astrocystites w/ Associated Paleocrinus or Carabocrinus - Bobcaygeon Formation - Ontario, Canada 5. Neuropterid pteridosperm Frond - Late Carboniferous - Piesberg quarry, Germany 6. Eldredgeops rana Cluster - Middle Devonian Moscow Formation - Blasdel, NY 7. Tree Fern (Pecopteris sp.) - Carboniferous Rhode Island Formation - Portsmouth, Rhode Island
  12. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends September 6th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE. 1. Mosasaurus maximus Tooth - Late Cretaceous Wenonah Formation - Monmouth County, New Jersey 2. Associated Alligator Material - Oligocene Chandler Bridge Formation - Summerville, SC 3. Carcharocles angustidens Tooth (2.2") - Oligocene Chandler Bridge Formation - Summerville, SC 4. Tylosaurus proriger Jaw Section - Cretaceous Ozan Formation - North Sulphur River, Texas 5. Associated Ichthyosaur Bones - Lower Jurassic - Kromer Quarry, Germany 6. Mosasaur Premaxilla - Cretaceous Ozan Formation - North Sulphur River, Texas 7. Protemnodon Jaw Section - Pleistocene - Queensland, Australia 8. Lungfish Tooth Plate - Cretaceous - Marlboro, New Jersey, USA
  13. CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS CONFERENCE WEBSITE
  14. Florida Peace River unknown

    August is my month to catalog my fossils from the previous 12 months and summarize them in the required report to the Univ. of Florida so that my fossil permit can be renewed. As I grouped my stuff together, I found a few unknowns, mostly fragmentary, that I'd appreciate a little help with. This first one, I think, is pretty cool looking and appears to be complete. I'm not going to mess with the fragmentary stuff, since most of them aren't display worthy. Here's the little cool one from front, back and side.
  15. Peace River Water Quality

    I've been scheduling 2 trips a week to the Peace River, when I can, to take advantage of the low water levels and the warmer than normal days. This is the 1st year, in the 6 or so I've been hunting, that the water has become a soupy green color with suspended algae instead of remaining relatively clear with heavy algae growth on the bottom. The last 2 trips, I came back with what I thought might be a little heat rash on the earlier, and then a pretty broadly scattered rash on my trunk. I'm a little concerned about going back, so I went to the Santa Fe for a break, where the water was warm tea colored, but nice and clear (spring fed). I was just wondering if any other Peace River regulars were having any issues or if I'm just an overly sensitive guy! I'm going to hope today's rain is going to flush a little of the green stuff away, without introducing the end of our season.
  16. Hi all! As requested by quite a few people, here is the report of the Fossil Fair in Ede, which happened today (Saturday 11th of March 2017). It was a very fun fair with many people, several different organizations were present, a building filled with fossils from all over the world, and tons of amateurs and professionals buzzing around. It was quite busy, but the ambiance was great, or "gezellig" as we would say in Dutch. There were many fossils for sale, some at very low prices, and there was also quite a lot of trading. Here are some pics of the fair:
  17. I spent most of another day in a spot I've worked the last 4 or 5 times out, but had only moderate results this time. It's getting very hard to dig since the water is still cold, I'm wearing a 5 mil wetsuit and I'm up to my neck in the hole with not bottom showing yet. I wore an 18 pound weight belt for much of the day to keep me on the bottom and give me some leverage with the shovel. It's very tiring, but I really like the spot because the gravel is big and there is tons of bone mixed in......just not much in good shape......yet. Anyway, with guests coming next week for a little trip, I wanted to find a couple alternate spots to try, since the goal of all of our visitors is to find a nice meg. I stopped in a spot that gets lots of pressure and dropped in a hole that looked promising. The megs just started coming hand over fist. Nothing pristine, but 4 that are pretty darn nice with lots of other give away quality teeth. Hope I can do this again of next Friday when guests arrive. We tried an area very close to this one for an episode of "Fossil Hunters" and nobody in the group found anything other than fragments. It's just luck of the draw......and persistence. Here's the take for yesterday.
  18. Fossil Show: Ede 2017

    Hello all fossil-friends! (I'm not sure whether this is in the right thread, if it's not I'd love the admins to put it where it's meant to be .) Anyways, I wanted to tell everyone that their is a big fossil market at Ede (Netherlands) this weekend, and that I would love you to come! It is organized by the Paleobiologische Kring van Nerderland/Vlaanderen (Paleobiological Group of Netherlands/Flanders), the Werkgroep Fossielen Wageningen (Workgroup Fossils Wageningen), and the famous Fossiel.NET (basically a Dutch version of TFF); many other organizations/museums will be there too. There will be plenty of stuff to do: amateur-paleontologist encounters, fossil IDing by experts, fossil trading, fossil buying/selling, lectures by paleontologists, prep demonstrations, and many other fun fossil-related activities/workshops! Here's the info you need to know: Date: Saturday 11th March 2017 Time: 10:30 till 16:00 Address: Het ROVC, Galvanistraat 13, 6716 AE, Ede, NETHERLANDS Entry fee: FREE! Stuff to bring with you: fossils you are willing to trade, to prep, to get IDd, etc; and some money. No food needed (drinks and food available). Here is a link with all the information you need: https://english.fossiel.net/beursede/ BUT: this is only for fossils, so NO minerals, artifacts, etc.! I will of course be there, and I hope that you will also be. I hope to see you there! Max PS: I'm not an organizer or anything of the event, I'm just telling everyone about it so that there will be more people to meet.
  19. I've been working a hole for the last 3 visits to the river, more because it's a nice change of scenery for me, than because of the results. I seem to bring back more things I've never seen before from this spot than any other I've been digging in recently. First of all, here's the take for the day......1 very nice meg, 3 decent megs and the rest. I was wondering if this bone might still be identifiable, even though it's pretty beat up. The back side is now worn featureless so I didn't picture it. I think it looks more like a complete bone which is very badly worn, than a broken end off of a long bone. Thanks for your attention and time.
  20. A friend and I went to the Peace River yesterday to enjoy the 80 degree weather and although we found little, I brought back this phalanx that looked carnivorish. It's about 1/4 inch longer and quite a bit thinner than previously identified Jaguar/Dire wolf phalanxes, so I wondered if anyone here might have a fairly confident idea of to whom it belongs. Appreciate the time.
  21. Three personal finds and these are some beauties! Show these members you appreciate their efforts to share their best discoveries this month. The poll ends February 6th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE. 1. Panthera onca jaguar proximal phalanx - Pleistocene - Florida, USA 2. Carcharocles chubutensis shark tooth - Miocene (Burdigalian) - Portugal 3. Allodesmus kernensis mandible with an upper incisor and a cetacean vertebra - Middle Miocene Round Mountain Silt - California, USA
  22. The new year offers us another international selection of personal finds! Let these members know you appreciate their efforts to share their best discoveries this month. The poll ends February 6th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE. 1. Gryphaea (Bilobissa) dilobotes oyster - Middle Jurassic Lower Oxford Clay (Peterborough Formation) - UK 2. Pachydiscus c.f. maconensis ammonite - Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) - Texas, USA 3. Hoploparia gabbi lobster - Upper Cretaceous Navesink Formation - New Jersey, USA 4. Cyclothyris (Rynchonella) vespertilio brachiopod - Senonian (Upper Cretaceous) - Touraine, France 5. Aphelecrinus randolphensis, Pulaskicrinus campanulus, and Phanocrinus bellulus crinoids - Upper Mississippian (Middle Chesterian) Lower Bangor Limestone - Alabama, USA 6. Clypeaster sp. echinoid - Miocene (Burdigalian) - Sesimbra, Portugal 7. Prionocyclus hyatti ammonite - Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) Blue Hill Member of the Carlile Shale (Mancos) - New Mexico, USA 8. Plant spore - Upper Carboniferous Pennine Middle Coal measures formation - West Yorkshire, UK
  23. About 2 weeks ago I headed out to the Peace river with my kayak, screen and shovel and decided to launch at a new bridge and take a long paddle into the middle of nowhere. I paddled for over an hour before I spotted a downed tree on shore with big chunky gravel stuck in the roots and around the base. The river had fine sand on the surface but I went about 50' down stream, stuck my grounding rod in and at about 12" deep felt chunky chunky goodness. I tied up the yak, grabbed my trusty shovel and began to excavate a 6' hole. It took a good hour or two to get deep enough that I wasn't constantly getting sand caving into the hole but then the treasures began to show up. I got a little bit of everything here and a nice mix of mammal and shark teeth. I threw some snarge in the hole to make it look unappealing to others and came back yesterday with a good friend and his father. We all did good and left with several treasures and some great memories. Over the two trips I collected what is pictured below as well as a bunch of smaller fossils, random bones, turtle shell etc. There are several megs, horse teeth, bison teeth, cow teeth, tapir teeth, a full rooted camel tooth, big chunk of mastodon tooth, piece of sloth tooth, Antler attached to piece of skull, Astralgus, tympanic ear bones, verts....It was a good day to say the least! We never hit bottom and I have no idea how long this buried gravel bar is but I plan on spending time investigating further I really do love this river. Some days the finds are small and slow, some days you feel like spending the night in the river so no one jumps your hole of "gold" but it's always a good day!
  24. Once again it's time for the Paradoxides to dust off the top hat and ring in the new year. I'm eagerly looking forward to another great year of spectacular fossil treasures at TFF. Happy New Year 2017!
  25. Ladies and gentlemen- The new year is coming upon us. I bet you need a fossil themed calendar to hang in your office/lab/bathroom etc. I have just the thing. For the past ten year almost, I have put together a fossil prep calendar. This is a fund raising project for SVP's Preparation Grant. Money raised from the sales of this calendar go towards improving fossil preparation by granting cash to a museum or person who proposes a project. This year the winner was a young lady from Egypt who will be coming to the states to learn some prep techniques that she can bring back to her museum to help prepare Egyptian fossils professionally. I have a few calendars leftoves from the SVP (Society of Vertebrate Paleontlogy) meeting in Salt Lake City last month Anyway there are 12 great pix of... a New Zealand whale skull in the field, a Cretaceous theropod tooth, an Eocene primate skull with associated CT scan, a Camarasaurus premax, a Solnhofen pterosaur, a White River mammal posing for its portrait, dino footprints doing the same, a pentaceratops vert in the lab, thin section of hadrosaur teeth, a pile of aetosaur scutes being sorted, a nice plaster jacket form a mosasaur dig and its human caretaker, and a Ceolophysis bonebed shot (one heckuva pile of Triassic bones). yes, friends you need a calendar to adorn the collection. To receive one of your very own, please send me money that I will pass along. Make checks payable to me. 20 bucks (USA) per calendar and 5 dollars shipping per order. Send to : JP Cavigelli Tate Museum 125 College Dr. Casper, WY 82601 (Note: The calendar comes with American holidays and a few Canadians)
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