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Found 26 results

  1. Here is another piece of my dinosaur collection - this time material from Eurasian countries. Unfortunately don't have any Triassic or Early Jurassic material, so let's begin with Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) of Itat formation, Krasnoyarskyi region, Russia. Theropods are the most common dinosaurs from there, yet their teeth rarely exceed 15 mm in length. Here is my largest one - could be from Kileskus aristotocus, an early Proceratosaurid (ancestor of Cretaceous tyrannosaurs) and the only described dinosaur from this location. Here are a bunch of Kileskus teeth I had before There also likely were more theropod species, similar to contemporary Chinese Dashanpu formation - methriacanthosaurids (equivalent to Sinraptor), megalosaurids and ceratosaurs. Some teeth I have or had that could be megalosaurids due to bulkier shape and finer serrations (all around 1 cm). In addition I have some specimens from diverse herbivores - Stegosaurids Long-necked sauropods (Mamenchisauridae), possible embryonic teeth Heterodontosaurid fang tooth, 5 mm (huge for this species!)
  2. Mammal mandible IDs

    I have two mandibles from Asia probably Siberia that I need help IDing. #1 is a hair over 4" and the most complete tooth has a pointed premolar. #2 is 6 1/2" and all the teeth are complete besides the first molar. It looks very similar to some deer mandibles I have but the teeth are twice the height and half the width. Thank you for looking! #1
  3. Dzik_Phong_2016_Stratigraphy.pdf Dating of Cambrian–Ordovician boundary strata in northernmost Vietnam and methodological aspects of evolutionary biostratigraphic inference Jerzy Dzik and Nguyen Duc Phong Stratigraphy, vol. 13, no. 2, text-figures 1–5, pages 83–93, 2016 less than 2 Mb
  4. stomping ground

    lagersta Early Jurassic basal sauropodomorpha dominated tracks from Guizhou,China: Morphology, ethology, and paleoenvironment Lida Xing, Martin G. Lockley , Dongjie Tang, Hendrik Klein , Guangzhao Peng Geoscience Frontiers 10,2019 8,05 Mb
  5. This is an Oviraptor egg, Eastern Asia, 60% eggshell coverage. 80 million years old. It seems authentic to me, but I’m not an expert. Do you believe that this is authentic (and definitely an Oviraptor egg)? Also is this is a quality specimen? Thanks
  6. Hello, does anyone know if there are any great fossil hunting sites in Asia? I'm going to Chiang Mai, Thailand this summer for a week, will be happy to know if there is some. Other fossil hunting sites in Asia countries are also welcomed. By the way, are there any marvelous natural history/ fossil museums in Thailand?
  7. Large and reasonably old

    VERY HIGHLY ,nay,UNRESERVEDLY recommended,3,2 Mb This is for all those who are interestested (almost said "this is dedicated to all those interested" in the earliest history of (multicellular) animals!!!!!!!!!! in Earths earliest biota... myanknollszieparamNaturellular_eukaryotes_from_the_.pdf Give it a go, because Zhu and Knoll do know their paleobiology. I would NOT be far wrong in saying that now that Martin Brasier is no longer with us, Knoll is one of the biggest names in "early earth/astrobiology".
  8. My wife obtained this in China about 10-15 years ago. It was said to be from Tibet?? Can anyone here tell us more about it? It weighs 5.6 lbs. It's 10" tall and 5 1/2" across at the widest point. The insect is 2 1/2" across.
  9. dagrimaldiCretacTropiclLizard2016.pdf HIGHLY recommended*,for reasons that will become immediately obvious Less than 2,0 Mb *the why of it: 1)simple esthetics(extremely pleasing(I think)photographic coverage) 2)the style of preservation,with concurrent implications for,e.g.phylogeny) below:the least interesting illustration
  10. Hi all, I am noticing an increasing number of sellers (especially those based in Asia) who advertise on Facebook, Instagram, WeChat and other social media instead of eBay. Unfortunately, many of them do not use Paypal. As you know, not every payment platform has buyer protection. To protect yourself, please carry out these checks: 1) Find out why the seller doesn't use Paypal. Is it for a legitimate reason? E.g. a Lebanese seller can't use Paypal as it's restricted there. Mainland China sellers apparently, CAN use Paypal, so take extra care if they refuse to use it. 2) Check the seller's track records. Ask friends and trusted collectors if any of them have ever made successful dealings with the seller. 3) Beware of similar photos on multiple platforms. Scammers sometimes create fake profiles that look just like a legitimate dealer, and steal their pictures as well. Perform background checks. Don't just assume that a dealer has multiple accounts, FIND OUT. Message him on his separate accounts (e.g. Facebook and eBay) and see if he notices. 4) Beware of non-Paypal platforms such as AliPay, WeChat and Western Union etc. There is little-to-no buyer protection on them. Don't send your money over unless you are absolutely sure of this deal. 5) Ask questions! Does the dealer know what shipping to use? Can the dealer take multiple photos of the fossil for you at specific angles you request? Is the dealer evasive with his answers? Is the deal too good to be true? There is no such thing as too much checking. 6) Be objective. It doesn't matter how friendly a dealer is. He could be the friendliest man on the planet, asking you about your family and work, laughing at your jokes, liking all your pictures. Most of the time, all they want is your money. Dealers who genuinely want to be your friend are rare gems, and worth holding on to. 7) Facebook mutual friends / Instagram followers doesn't matter. Scammers can make attractive accounts and add a thousand friends just to look trustworthy. I've seen a scammer FB account that shared over 100 mutual friends with me. 8) Does your credit card protect you? Assuming the dealer is sketchy, but you are somewhat sure of this deal, find out if your credit card/bank can protect you if this is a scam. Take note that AliPay doesn't work with many major credit cards. 9) If all else fails, demand Paypal. If the dealer genuinely wants business, and he operates in a country with Paypal, then it's in his best interest to use Paypal. Remember - great fossils appear every other day. Is this deal so special as to be worth the risk you're taking? Lastly, don't forget to post some pictures here at TFF; there are many experts here more than willing to share their expertise. Good luck!
  11. FumegtCORRECTEDPROOF (1).pdf given the roster of authors and the source publication:HIGHLY recommended/about 2,9 Mb One new avimimid named figs 1 & 12 are a hoot, and pretty useful. Cranial & postcranial material ,BTW
  12. Sri Lanka gem

    nasdalgemmolmineralopetrography919.pdf
  13. whole lotta sauropod(Page guitar riff)

    The Chinese colossus: an evaluation of the phylogeny of Ruyangosaurus giganteus and its implications for titanosaur evolution by Nima Sassani and Gunnar Tyler Bivens. here
  14. mushex Fossil mushrooms are rare.... Documentationwise: 10 out of 10
  15. Chinese dinosaur(prosauropoda)

    As crania go,a reasonably well preserved specimen barretyunnannosaudinosaujurasj.1096-3642.2007.00290.x.pdf
  16. VRMBR

    Some of you might enjoy this one. NB large download,about 90 Mb I enjoyed coming across this one,folks. It's monumental,in more than one sense of the word. Rich
  17. Micro ammonite from Asia

    This came as a pleasant surprise. I was going through some shells collected from years ago, and when I was done, I saw that some sand has fallen off, probably from inside a gastropod. Among the sand was this ammonite, only 2mm in length. I don't know which shell it came off, or where it may be from. Most of my shells are from Hong Kong, but I have also collected in several other East Asian countries. I have read that Sulciferites hongkongensis, Coroniceras sp., and Arietites sp. have been found in Hong Kong, but don't know whether there are other species. I also found this passage from page 427 of "Biostratigraphy of China" on Google Books which might be relevant: Might it be possible to narrow down the ID or age from the pictures? Thanks in advance!
  18. Triassic Mollusca

    an oldie,by a famous name Mojs NB: LARGE download AS usual with old (19th century)monographs,the plates are absolutley horrible to look at
  19. Tyrannosaurid cladistics

    reasonably new,don't know if it's been posted yet http://www.pnas.org/content/113/13/3447.full.pdf
  20. Your saying did I read the Topic correctly? Uzbekistan? Where is that? Is that a country? Dinosaurs were there? Well yes to all those questions. First: where is it? well its in Central Asia next to Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. I'm sure that clarifies the locality In case your still scratching your head here is a map of the region On the map all of the Dinosaurs in this post come from the Kyzyl Kum Desert. I highlighted the area on the map with two red lines. The area is quite difficult to collect but if you dare quite productive for Dinosaur fossils and meteorites. Here are a few pictures of the area. No its not me in the pictures I'm not that crazy. The Dinosaurs from this area are poorly understood but there has been some study done in Russia. An excellent paper of this area is: Dinosaurs of Northern Eurasia: New Data About Assemblages, Ecology and Paleobiogeography by L Nessov published in 1995 and then translated into English. Unfortunately I cannot find the paper with the plate so no images. Specifics: Age: Cenomanian - Turonian (94.3-89.3mya) Bissekty Formation in the Kyzyl Kum Desert. Navoi Region My collection will begin with a number of Therizinosaurus hand claws. Most of you may not be familiar with this dinosaur. Its one of the most interesting ones ever to exist and paleontologists are still trying to understand it.. It begins its existence in the early cretaceous as a meat eating predator about 4 meters long and ends its reign at the end of the cretaceous as a giant 10 meter long herbivore with gigantic meter long claws on their hands. Quite a transformation, wish I had some of those claws. Great reference : Therizinosaur : mystery of the Sickle-claw dinosaur by the Museum in Northern Arizona. Only $10 The first group of pictures all all Therizinosaur hand claws. more to follow:
  21. Any Fossil Sites Near Tokyo, Japan?

    Hey all, I might be going on a trip to Japan next year and I was wondering if anyone knew of any good spots near Tokyo? I would really love to get my hands on some Japanese fossils! thanks all!
  22. Our Trip Around The World

    Hello everyone! Its been a while since I've been on TFF, mostly just due to being busy with non fossil related work and not getting out in the field much. I've gone on a few hunts but haven't really come across anything too spectacular recently. Hopefully though thats all about to change! For the past year or so my girlfriend and I have been planning a trip around the world, starting this upcoming July 6th. We're going to be backpacking, camping, fishing, immersing ourselves in new cultures, and doing as much fossil hunting as we possibly can. We'll mostly be relying on our tent, friends, family, couchsurfers, and hostels for places to stay. We've done a ton a research about what we're gonna do, and are getting really excited! We'll be landing in the UK from the east coast of the US, then heading over to Belgium for a couple weeks. Hopefully we'll come across a few shark teeth. Then its back to the UK from late July to October, heading up through Scotland, then into Ireland, then back into southern England. We then head over to Germany, Switzerland, France, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, then a ferry over to Italy, then Greece, and then on to many more countries afterwards. I've had a love for paleontology since my early childhood, and have read up quite a bit on European fossil localities, but I really only still have a vague picture of what looking for fossils is like in Europe, Africa, and Asia. I'm posting this on the Fossil Forum in the hopes that I can get some general advice, maybe hear a story or two, and maybe even meet up and do some hunting with a forum member or two. Our schedule is very flexible, and both my girlfriend and I would love to hang out and share stories with other fossil hunters from around the world. I'll also be bringing a huge bag of southern California shark teeth to trade and give out along the way As we travel and look for fossils we'll make sure to take lots of photos and post the most interesting finds we come across here in this post. Thanks, Joseph and Katherine
  23. With regards to early studies of the geographic origins of mankind's relatives, it's important to know that Australopithecus was discovered two years after Roy Chapman Andrews went to Mongolia to try to find the earliest human ancestors. I know that Andrews never found early human ancestors in Mongolia and Australopithecus is three million years older than any of the early human beings discovered before Andrews' expedition to Mongolia, but Andrews and Osborn did not expect a human relative to be found in Africa. Would Andrews have considered the possibility of Africa being the cradle of mankind if he didn't find human ancestors in Africa? Did Osborn and Andrews ever change their mind about the geographic origin of mankind after hearing about the discovery of Paranthropus and other early human relatives in Africa in the 1930s?
  24. Velociraptor claw Replica

    From the album Reptile Fossils

    Velociraptor mongoliensis A replica of the killing claw and toe digits of a Velociraptor. Original from: Djadokhta Formation, Mongolia Age: Late Cretaceous

    © &copy Olof Moleman

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