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Found 330 results

  1. If you are a fossil collector in an Ordivician area, the Rafinesquina is a pretty common find. Here are pics of some typical pieces from my collection. The R. ponderosa (middle) are typically 4 to 5 cms wide. Below is the view of them from the side, showing their basic difference in appearance. Late last summer I came across 3 brachiopods on a maybe 30 degree roadcut south of Dayton, OH that are similar to the Rafinesquina. All three were within 2 feet of each other and broken "from the middle out" as if they had been stepped on...or maybe run over by a tractor mowing the roadcut? They were huge. I've never seen any so big. Not even pieces. Although they were mostly missing the tips of their hinge line they were still 7.5 to 9 cms wide. Here they are above and below my initial trio. But they aren't just wider, they're just flat out bigger. Here are a side and a front view of one alongside a R. ponderosa. I have found the "typical" Rafinesquina in other sites both north, south, east and west of this site. Within miles and up to 20 miles of this site and at higher and lower elevations. I've gone back to the site and there were no others, nor any on the other side of the road. Have any other Ordivician collectors come across these before? I haven't seen any mentioned anywhere. Although the literature disagrees, are these actually what the Ponderosa looks like?
  2. Hello, I found these, I'm guessing bivalves, and was just wondering if anybody could tell me a little about them? Sorry there's no scale, the larger one is about 2cm, and the smaller about half a centimetre. I found them in Northamptonshire, UK. Thanks.
  3. Hello there! I took advantage of the nice weather we've been having to visit Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) yesterday afternoon. Here are some photos of specimens that I'd like help identifying - perhaps @Tidgy's Dad would like to have a look? Firstly - the whole rock which contains the bryozoans and the unknown black objects: Specimen #1: a nice branching bryozoan - perhaps Homotrypa? Specimen #2: a nice encrusting bryozoan (there are actually two of them) - perhaps Mesotrypa? More to come...
  4. Hey everyone! This will be my first attempt at a trade in the TFF. Im offering a variety of fossils from the Price Creek Formation of Humboldt County, Northern California. This formation has been dated to late Miocene early Pliocene. As far as to what I’m looking for in this trade, I love all things Mollusca! Gastropods, Bivalves, Ammonites, Belemnites or Brachiopods, I’ll take them all. Invertebrates of any kind will strike my fancy though. The weirder the better. I’ve seen some Ram’s Horn Oysters that are awesome! I have no qualms about trading for these as a whole set, however shipping would be cheaper. I’m willing to ship anywhere in the United States, if your international I’m afraid that you’ll have to absorb that cost. I really appreciate all the knowledge that members have been forthcoming with sharing. Please pm me if your interested. -Nick
  5. Oyster from Wroclaw

    Hey everyone, Someone on reddit posted this great-looking oyster, asking for ID. And I can’t figure it out. The hinge looks really weird to me and inconsistent with the usual Ostrea oysters I see... They said it was excavated from a construction site about 12 years ago in the city of Wroclaw (Poland), near the Odra/Oder River. Which means there isn’t any literature about the age/formation/etc. Only thing I could find is this geological map that puts the area in Tertiary sediments (which is logical but not very helpful). Anyone have an idea of what to say about this shell? Age and formation would be great, and genus (or species but I’m not getting my hopes up that high) also. Maybe @Kasia you’ve come across some of them? Thanks in advance! Max
  6. Almost micro

    Hi everyone! Oxfordian again This time it's the turn of small shells from Peski Quarry, located some 80 km south-east of Moscow. It's something like the Moscow region's Jurassic gastropod heaven. For some geologic reasons, ammonites do not get preserved there while little gastropods and bivalves do. It's also the only place dinosaurs were found in the Moscow region. As of today the continental sediments are depleted, but the marine ones are stil abundant. The quarry extracts Carboniferous limestone, removing Callovian marl and Oxfordian clay. The clay is then discharged in open piles - small shells of exceptional quality are washed up during rains. Below are pictures from two trips: one in winter (with snow) and one recently. To get to the Jurassic part of the quarry fastest you have to go through woods along a small river:
  7. Ancient Shell Has Revealed Exactly How Much Shorter Days Were 70 Million Years Ago https://www.sciencealert.com/old-shell-reveals-earth-s-days-were-half-an-hour-shorter-70-million-years-ago de Winter, N.J., Goderis, S., Van Malderen, S.J., Sinnesael, M., Vansteenberge, S., Snoeck, C., Belza, J., Vanhaecke, F. and Claeys, P., Sub‐daily scale chemical variability in a Torreites sanchezi rudist shell: Implications for rudist paleobiology and the Cretaceous day‐night cycle. Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, p.e2019PA003723 https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2019PA003723 Yours, Paul H.
  8. I found this while perusing my local beach. It originate off the coast and washed up on shore. It’s in fossiliferous limestone on a bivalve cast. I really can’t figure out what these are. I am specifically talking about the radiating fossils in the top margin of the photo. If anyone has ideas it would be appreciated
  9. Need help identifying this bivalve

    Attached is a bivalve I found in the Bradenton, FL area. It looks like a “cats-paw”. Can someone help me with the identification of this fine fossil? Thanks!
  10. These shells all look similar in nature except the last one, pictured by itself. Any way to identify, specifically? Thank You! Freshwater Creek, very slick light brown clay bottom which is blue grey once penetrated and dug. Also sand.
  11. Lopha species

    Good morning all. I have what I believe to be a Lopha bivalve from the upper Jurassic period from China. It measures 8.2 x 5.1 cm and has growth lines(?). Can anyone provide additional information or a correction if required?
  12. California bivalve ID

    Hi everyone, I have recently received this fossil as part of a trade with @Huntonia the bivalve comes from California, but other than that I have no more information. I am guessing it is from somewhere in the cenozoic which is an era that I am not highly familiar with. Any info would be great, Thank you.
  13. Bivalve IDs from SC coast

    All of these were found beach combing in Charleston, SC and all were caked with what I believe is limestone. A. Not sure on this one. Thought clam before pulling away some limestone but now thinking oyster? About 5cm wide. B. Scallops, wondering type and age if identifiable About 3 cm tall. C. Was thinking scallop on this one but it doesn’t seem to have the same vertical lines, they’re all horizontal. Roughly 9cm tall. Thank you all in advance! I’ll be posting some corals and bones tomorrow if I have no luck finding anything myself
  14. What shell is this? (Found at Lulworth)

    Found this at Lulworth Cove which is a Late Jurassic to Mid Cretaceous area.
  15. Whitby area find; Devils Toenail?

    As well as lots of the usual belemnites and ammonites, my daughter found this today on a beach in the Whitby area. It’s unlike anything we’ve found before; am I right in thinking it’s a ‘devil’s toenail’ (gryphaea?)
  16. Just a rock, or a fossil bivalve?

    Happy new year. This is my first attempt at a post, so try and go easy. I respect the depth and breadth of knowledge in this forum. Thanks for yours in advance. Unfortunately I do not have a proper provenance for this specimen. This peice was purchased at auction with a rock lot, silified chalcedony (agate), and I was surprised at the symmetry and shape. My amateur mind brought me to fossil bivalve. Another specimen from the same lot shows this exact shape and general size, so here I am. What are your thoughts? Thanks again. 125mm x 115mm x 60mm 1216g or 2lb 10oz
  17. hi guys i recently found this spiny jurassic bivalve, the matrix is very soft (i started prep with a in vise), but the spines are fairly delicate so i felt that wasnt the best method, is there anyone that would be willing to prep it, i can send more photos and the measurements are 11 x 12 x 8 cm, but i am on a low budget so a uk preparator would be favourable but if need be i can ship worldwide (also it has potentially both valves but not sure on that happy christmas will
  18. I just received this nice Aviculopecten bivalve from Mazon Creek today. What catches my eye is the thing extending from the top of the shell. It almost looks like it could be the siphon protruding outwards. I haven't seen a similar specimen before. Any thoughts?
  19. Pennsylvanian Bivalves

    Here are two Pennsylvanian bivalves I have not been able to ID. I've seen some similar looking ones but in all honesty, I find that most bivalves look the same to me. The first is from the LaSalle Limestone Member of the Bond Formation, Oglesby, IL.
  20. This next species is the second most common animal found in the Essex portion of the Mazon Creek deposit. While there are over a dozen described bivalves found in the Mazon Creek deposit, Mazonomya is by far the most abundant. It is restricted to the Essex (marine) portion of the deposit, where in some areas have been found to make as much as 70 percent of all bivalves collected. At one collecting site, these clams are so common the area has been nicknamed Chowder Flats. Despite the abundance of specimens, Mazonomya was not formally described until 2011. For years it had been misidentified as a type of bivalve named Edmondia. Current research has shown it is actually a Solemyid. Before formal description, Mazon collectors referred to these bivalves as clam-clams due to the fact that they are often preserved in a death position with both valves opened. Mazonomya is the largest clam found in the deposit . While quite rare, specimens have been found over 4 centimeters in length. preservation can be excellent and in some cases, soft tissue can be preserved. Specimens have been found with preserved “death trails”. Solemyids are still found today in oxygen poor and sulfide rich marshes. This first specimen is the largest in my collection. The valves measure almost 4 centimeters. There is also some evidence of the hinge ligament (soft tissue) between the valves.
  21. Unknown Bivalve

    I cannot prep this Lower Oxford Clay bivalve beyond what you see as its in quite a fragile state, I’ve identified it as a species of Meleagrinella would you agree @oxford clay keith
  22. Crassostrea??

    So I only have the faintest idea of what this could be. I vote for the oyster crassostrea since that's what I was told. But now someone told me it was a rudist and im a bit confused. Could it be cretaceous?
  23. Indiana Ordovician Bivalve ID

    Over the weekend I found this bivalve while collecting at the St. Leon, Indiana roadcut. I posted it in the Hunting Trip section, but received no ID on this piece, so I figured that I would put it here to see if some Member could give me an ID. I have never found one like this before nor can I find a similar one while checking various web pages. Thanks
  24. Fall Break Fossil Trips

    The next few days are fall break for me, so I'm home from school. I decided to take the day today to explore two sites in Northern Illinois. The first is an outcrop of the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Kendall County, IL. I learned about this site from a recent trip report posted here, and found it after a little detective work. I was hoping to find Tentaculites oswegoensis, a small conical fossil of unknown affinities which is only found in this area. It only took me a few minutes before I found a few. I only stayed for 20 minutes or so, as Tentaculites is really the only well preserved fossil in these exposures. There were some brachiopod and bryozoan fragments, but nothing noteworthy.
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