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Found 277 results

  1. bivalve that looks like a "toe"?

    Hi, All. I don't have a clue what these are, but I'm guessing a bivalve of some kind? They came from the desert sand near Agadez, Niger, but that's all I know. The street merchant I got them from thought they were dino toes, but I'm guessing not.... The thing that confuses me the most (other than the fact that I haven't been able to find any pictures of bivalves that look like this) is that it doesn't look like the "shell" would actually close like a clam or mussel. Any and all help in identifying these would be most appreciated! Rob
  2. I've been busy whacking concretions today (ok not so much whacking as gently knocking around and around until they give way), and this is the first one where it contained something that I suspect can be identified. Anyone know what bivalve this is? It's from the middle of the formation, so I think that means Lower Zemorrian? At least that's what it was called in the 1960s when the relevant report was published, I dunno if it's been standardized to some other designation since then. The shell measures 3cm across.
  3. Clam Bivalve Deer Hearts.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Bivalves Clams Commonly known as Deer Hearts Found in Hays, Comal, Bandera Counties
  4. Bivalve Scallops.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Bivalves Scallops Found in Hays County
  5. bivalve pterotrigonia (2).JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Bivalves Pterotrigonia Found in Hays, Bandera and Blanco Counties
  6. Bivalve Pecten Cats Pws.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Bivalves - Pecten Found in Hays and Comal Counties Commonly known as Cats Paws
  7. Bivalve Neithia.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Bivalves, Neithia Found in Hays County
  8. Hi all, This weekend, after the long, boring and annoying winter months (it's always mildly cold, but very windy and rainy in the Netherlands in winter... horrible fossil hunting conditions) spring finally let out the tip of its nose, with a nice sun, blue sky and decent temperature. About time! We all know what this means... time to do some fossil-hunting! So on Sunday morning I woke up, prepared my fossil hunting equipment (mainly bags and boxes; no tools needed for this beach), made myself a lunch, and set out at 13:00 to the bus. The bus ride to Kijkduin takes me about an hour, so I arrived at the beach at 14:06. But, as usual, because it's by bus I'm not dropped off at the ideal spot, so I have to walk about an hour on the beach, due south-west, to actually get to the Zandmotor. But that wasn't much of a problem... this part of the beach already has a few fossils to yield, although not as many, so you can start the fossil hunting right away. Didn't find anything significant though in that first stretch. You're literally walking on lots of Eemian fossil shells, but these species are all very common. Spisula solida, Cerastoderma edule, C. glaucum, and Macoma balthica are just not worth picking up, unless it's a specimen that stands out to me (unusual size, pathologies, weird colors, etc). Here's a map to better illustrate the places I will mention. Note that it's approximate. Also, the sand cliffs and the shell banks often move around, we are after all on a beach with lots of wind and water movement, so these positions aren't defined. But this is what was the case this weekend. And the pink Zandmotor "limit" isn't accurate either, it's more my view as in "this is good fossil-hunting territory". By the way, that red S is where the bus drops me off. Oh, and that big puddle in the middle of the beach is actually a very popular kite-surf spot, especially for amateurs because there are no waves. This time I started off the hunt at the "sand cliffs" as I like to call them, (2m tall at the highest point, so not real cliffs), then went on to an area more to the south of the Zandmotor (at the bottom of the dark blue line on the map). It was my first time properly hunting that little area, and it turns out it's actually a good spot, I found lots of good bivalve fossils there! After an hour or two I sat down to eat my lunch (yes, a very late lunch, but time flies by when you're fossil hunting! I'm actually still surprised I remembered to eat my lunch at all, I usually get so caught up in the hunt that I often just completely forget to eat my lunch at all ), then went onto the richest part of the Zandmotor when it comes to shells, the..... (drumroll please)............. shell banks! I know, very unexpected! The real Eemian shell banks are usually lying on the north-center of the Zandmotor, between the cliffs and the shoreline. That is when I made my two favorite finds of the day: a gorgeous Propebela turricula, and a bit later, Gari fervensis! After a total of about 5 hours hunting, I decided it was time to get back home, so I called it a day. But man was it a good day! I found an incredible diversity of fossil shells, especially bivalves. Onto some pictures, starting with some location pics.
  9. Bivalve shell imprint in rock

    At Lake Erie this morning I was walking along the shore and found this rock, which has an imprint of a bivalve shell in it. I was looking through the collections of bivalves on this site and it seems similar to a cockle shell, but I was hoping someone a bit more knowledgeable than I am might help me to correctly identify it. I tried to get the best detail of it that I could, and I also have pictures showing size as well as ones showing other sides of the rock, in case that might help with identification. If you would like additional angles/pictures, just ask. Thank you in advance for any help!
  10. Beach agate, possible bivalve?

    I found this on a rocky beach in West Seattle. Looks to be pretty transparent with a bit of banding. I assume it's just geological, but based on the size and shape I guess it could maybe be a bivalve fossil? SG is 2.61
  11. Cool clam, do u know what it is?

    Hi everyone, i have yet another backyard find. Upstate New York. Any ideas? Thanks for the info.
  12. Pretty shells

    I know brachipod and bivalves are common and many people often overlook them, but I figured i'd share some of mine i found this past month that I enjoy. A lot of them take on a white or orange color. 1 Has some bryozoans as well I believe.
  13. Pleuromya ? (Jurassic bivalve)

    Hi, I have found this piece in a well-known jurassic site where brachs abound (Late Pliensbachian/early Toarcian, Tenuicostatum biozone, Iberian-Pyrennes basin) My guess is genus Pleuromya. At species level, Pleuromya rotundata is mentioned in the zone, but I find nothing about it (I fear of an invalid or junior species). It looks like Pleuromya uniformis, of whitch @Ludwigia and @nala have posted some pictures.
  14. Last weekend we made a trip to my favorite Devonian hunting spot. As usual we found a few goniatites, but apart from this we found a lot of smaller fossils like brachiopods, crinoids and even a bivalve. and a few other nice surprises. The small bivalve: glyptohallicardia sp. 2 valves and pyritised, only a few mm wide with bot halves preserved. a very nice crinoid calyx a tiny brachiopod ( Lingula ) One of the best finds of the day was a fish tooth, I’m still unsure on the species, but I think something in the area of a Euchondrocephalid like Helodus. It the my oldest tooth in my collection Still, I did find an even better fossil , I’ll let you speculate on what this might be, but for now it is packed in the trunk of my car and I’m going to drop it off to the local institute Halfway on the way back home we spotted a construction site with a little bit of chalk coming out of the ground, we stopped for a prospection and came back with a few incomplete echinoids and 2 belemnites . So it is always worth to stop at an interesting looking spot
  15. Jurassic / Cretaceous Oregon fossil?

    Hey, I posted my trip to California from Washington yesterday. I have now looked through my rocks and noticed that one of these rocks are different from the rest. I took a picture of the Buchia Bivalve in the first image, to show that it has a different shape and markings than the bivalves I found there. If anyone can give me a genus that would be great. Is this another shell or something more? Thanks guys
  16. Exogyra vs Gryphaea

    I'm studying fossils and I'm having a difficult time understanding the visual(and structural) differences between Exogyra and Gryphaea. Any insights would be very much appreciated!
  17. Cretaceous bivalve?

    Hi all, I've been spending time walking the beach at Compton, Isle of Wight, UK. I came across this fossil when I was sat down after walking 2 miles and finding nothing! I've not cleaned it up yet. All of the beach is of the cretaceous era, and was found at the Western end of the beach. I've found various Aptian age finds nearby previously. I've looked online,but nothing I've seen has the very symmetrical shape and close together ridges that this has. I'd appreciate any help with this! Many thanks, Steve.
  18. Hi all, I recently made a trip out to Wilson Clay Pit in Brownwood, Texas with my local paleo society. I've found several recognizable things, and a few I need some help identifying. I apologize in advance to @erose who gave me an idea on one bivalve that I failed to write down, and thereafter promptly forgot! I think the tooth is Petalodus sp., just need confirmation. I'd love a genus for the clams, and I have no idea at all what the small plate-shaped fossil is. Thanks!
  19. Bicorbula altavillensis

    From the album Lutetian Mollusks

    Bicorbula altavillensis Two valves in connection

    © Alexandre Tuel

  20. Plagiostoma Sp - Nanteuil

    From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    Plagiostoma Sp a huge (20cm +) bivalve from Nanteuil (France) aalenian.
  21. Plagistoma sp - Les Vaches Noires

    From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    Plagiostoma Sp : a bivalve from "les Vaches Noires" cliffs' oxfordian ooltih.
  22. Chama subgigas

    49
  23. Bicorbula altavillensis

    Synonymous with Corbula exarata (Deshayes, 1824).
  24. Saurorhynchus jaw

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 6bcm long Saurorhynchus (?) jaw from the quarry Kromer in Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic, Posidonia Shale). Next to it is a beautiful pyritized bivalve. Another picture:
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