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Found 293 results

  1. Interesting assortment of fossils

    Last year while fossil hunting in a creek in Chenango Forks, New York I came across an interesting looking rock. The rock was primarily made up of gastropods with a few bivalves and brachiopods. It was a very crumbly, silty rock. I believe it is upper Devonian because I’ve only ever found upper Devonian rocks at that creek but I’ve been unable to find anything close to what I found in Karl A. Wilson’s Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York
  2. More Big Brook what?

    Found at big brook they appear to be the same but same what? Thanks again
  3. Finally some success!

    Well my daughter and I have been hard at work hunting we got into it after her birthday and had a tiny bit of success at the beach but found a much better area to dig in the nanaimo group strata. I got "west coast fossils" the book so we could figure out what we were finding and finally these last few outings we are finding some great stuff! My only sadness is I found this huge bivalve but I dont think there is anyway to get it out without damaging it! Lifted a large 5" 2x3' slab off the top of this larger rock and we found this which was pretty awesome first large fossil we have found
  4. From the album Middle Devonian

    Gosselettia triqueter Pteriomorph Bivalve (both valves-complete- 3 inches long) Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Swamp Road Quarry Morrisville, N.Y.
  5. It was an all day outing on a perfect spring day in Central Upstate New York. Al Tahan and I visited a small private quarry where the Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member, part of the Marcellus Shale and the lower Hamilton Group is exposed. It's been about a year since I visited the site which I've been coming to for the past five years and it was Al's first visit. Erosion had broken down almost all of the pieces of shale which covered much of the site on previous visits. However a lot of fossils here, preserved in calcite are weathered free from the matrix and surface collecting can be very productive. This is by far the best site I've been to for the gastropod, Bembexia sulcomarginata. There were dozens strewn about the site. I couldn't resist picking up a few adding to my already extensive Bembexia collection. Brachiopods were also plentiful, especially the large spiriferid, Spinocyrtia granulosa (upper right). I couldn't help adding this inflated example to my large collection. Upper left is Mucrospirifer murcronatus, certainly one of the most abundant and distinctive Middle Devonian brachiopods in New York. Lower left is Protoleptostrophia perplana, a Strophomenid.
  6. A new report about the Cretaceous (Campanian) bivalves of the Coffee Sand In Mississippi is now available for downloading. It is: Dockery, D.T., 2020, Cretaceous (Campanian) Bivalves of The Coffee Sand In Mississippi. Open-File Report OFR-319. Department of Environmental Quality - Office of Geology, Jackson, Mississippi. https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/geology/work-areas/publications-and-map-sales/categories/open-file-reports/ofr-319-cretaceous-campanian-bivalves-of-the-coffee-sand-in-mississippi-60272/ https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/geology/work-areas/publications-and-map-sales/categories/ In addition, two older 7.5 minute geologic quadrangles for Tishomingo County, Mississippi, are now online at: https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/OFR5_BelmontDigitized.pdf https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/OFR6_Tishomingo_BishopDigitized.pdf https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/geology/work-areas/publications-and-map-sales/categories/ Yours, Paul H.
  7. Yesterday I was able to get out to Onondaga County in central NY. While I was there I got a chance to do some fossil hunting at two locations. The first was in Pompey Center, NY near Pratt’s Falls. The second location was a creek in Delphi Falls. The rock at both of these locations was the Skaneateles formation. I was able to get into a different formation at the second spot that was more shaly and had better preservation. This was my first time fossil hunting in the middle Devonian and I was amazed with the number of bivalves I found. (I’ve never found one in the lower Devonian near me). As well as bivalves I was able to find a few very well preserved gastropods, some brachiopods, a bunch of ostracods, and what I believe is a partial phyllocarid carapace.
  8. Hello, sorry to be a pain with all of these bivalve IDs. Is anybody able to ID any of these? They were found in Northamptonshire, UK, which is mostly Jurassic in age. Thanks.
  9. Is anybody able to ID this bivalve?

    Hello, I found this nice bivalve (I think), is anybody able to give a possible ID of it? Found in Northamptonshire, UK, which I think is mostly Jurassic in age.
  10. Bivalves on ironstone.

    From the album Fossils found with my bantams. Northamptonshire.

    The bivalve at the top was complete, unfortunately though, I accidentally broke it.
  11. From the album Middle Devonian

    Grammysia bisulcata Anomalodesmata bivalve (open shell) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Earlville, N.Y. First open specimen I've found of this common species.
  12. paleozoic malacology

    DBNA Middle and Upper Devonian Cryptodonta (Bivalvia)from the Pelagic Hercynian Facies -Taxonomy, Stratigraphy, and Paleoecology Judith Nagel Inaugural dissertation,2006 ABOUT 5,8 MB the research areas on a Devonian geodynamic reconstruction :
  13. Hello, I found these, I'm guessing bivalves, and was just wondering if anybody could tell me a little about them? Sorry there's no scale, the larger one is about 2cm, and the smaller about half a centimetre. I found them in Northamptonshire, UK. Thanks.
  14. Whitby area sightings

    A couple of things that we saw on a beach near Whitby but didn’t bring home. The area was full of scallop type bivalves and a lot of belemnites. One section of the beach had a lot of what I have shown in the first picture, resembling tree roots or cables; am I right in thinking that these are trace fossils of some kind of burrows? And what Could the second item be? It was in a large boulder along side a few small belemnites and was about 5cm in diameter.
  15. Rhaetic fossil

    Collected in 1994 in Cropwell Bishop Nottinghamshire UK, some Rhaetic pyrite layer pieces from a Gypsum mine. Packed full of bivalves, fish teeth and coprolites. Focusing on this particular find, would anyone know what it may be (1st picture) 1mm scale.
  16. bivalves and orthocone

    Also from @Kane, i'd like a little help to determine those devonian ones 1) From Deep Springs a) 2.4 cm hight, 3.2 cm width Grammysioidea arcuata ? b ) Modiomorpha ? Grammysia ? 4 cm hight, 2.5 cm width 2) Widder formation, Eifellian : a) 2.5 cm hight, 1.7 cm width b ) 4.7 cm hight, 2.9 cm width for the taller and 1.5 cm of thickness for the other one.
  17. Attached is a photo of a cluster of shells. I would like some assistance identifying the two. Here are my guesses: Chione elevata (cross barred Venus) and Macrocallista maculata (calico clam); both Venus clams (family Veneridae). My reference is from Southern Florida’s Fossil Seashells authored by Peterson.
  18. madagascan bivalves

    I was wondering that the madagascan jurassic clams and cretaceous cockscomb oysters from my collection did not have a comprehensive label,I wanted to ask you what they were.. Here are a few photos online: https://www.google.com/search?q=madagascar+fossil+clam&sxsrf=ACYBGNSyt5RjY1qraJUr3kcrF1FSPuVtBg:1581930994833&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=q1GrCKB9r4EOpM%3A%2CRVLU8rvAwW_qDM%2C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kRLA3HGjyWBFynUylzJaveHH4B7QA&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwish4aYoNjnAhXIUN4KHZ2nCtkQ9QEwAHoECAoQHg#imgrc=oy8HBIbkpemGJM
  19. I'm curious if anyone would be interested in trading for this wonderful piece with multiple bivalves/brachiopods. I don't have any information except that it was a beach find from southern California. Several of them are damaged, one is almost entirely complete (one small chip) and exposed most of the way. 2 others I believe are intact but are partially buried in the matrix. There are also a few more that are barely exposed that may be complete within the matrix. I think this piece could be excellent for prepping practice and with a little bit of work it could look really nice. PM me with any offers, trilobite material would be my preference but I'm not very picky. Here's a picture of the piece top down, more pictures are on the way.
  20. Dear Guys, During the last several years i detected unknown truth talking about Lithuanian boulders- the Carboniferous and Permian marine rocks are very numerous and their age is various- there can be found almost each stage of Carboniferous and Permian. The main rock types are three- dolomite and limestone with masses of brachiopods that is various in color, stromatolite limestone with mollusks and unidentified cephalon like fossils, and the last- lacustrine limestone with coelacanth scales and possible plant remains (Carboniferous rhabdodermatids are very numerous). Carboniferous period and Early- Middle Permian was not known in Lithuanian glacial boulders so I very need the strong expert, especially who works on Carboniferous- Permian brachiopods. If my age determinations are correct then I will write the scientific book about this discovery and i think there is huge possibility that many of these boulders could be transported by someone glaciation from Northwestern Russia (or Northern Ural) because there are big areas of Devonian, Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic rocks near surface and Northern mountains potentially could be the cold center at some glaciation period in the Pleistocene. I will show all the pictures with fossil identifications and size, maybe someone will tell the opinion about the taxon and age possibilities. Any contact detail or other important information is very welcome! First image- Angiospirifer (Late Carboniferous), 1.1 cm length Second image- Anthracospirifer (Middle- Late Carboniferous), 1.8 cm length third image- Archaeocidaridae sea urchin plates (Carboniferous), 5- 8 mm diameter Fourth image- unidentified brachiopod species from Carboniferous- Early Permian (8 mm- 1 cm length) Fifth image- Atomodesma? bivalves from Kungurian boulder with Waagenoconcha brachiopod (1.7- 2.3 cm length)
  21. Bivalves from Cretaceous

    Could be some bivalves from late Jurassic or washed out from Cretaceous. Northen New Mexico. All from one place. Thanks.
  22. Hi All. I was unsure where to put this message so hopefully this place is okay. I teach 7th grade Life Science and we are soon starting our coverage of major animal types (arthropods, echinoderms, molluscs, chordtates, etc). I am hoping to put together a teaching collection that can be used each year as we do this. If there are members here who are willing to donate any/all types of durable specimens (harder for young teens to destroy) that could be used to teach students the key features of these phyla. If you are willing and able to share can you please PM me directly. I do appreciate it :-)
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