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Found 59 results

  1. Centralia's Bright White Ferns

    Deep in the heart of Pennsylvania's coal country runs the Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation. Once a vast tract of swampland, the area was home to 100 ft. tall Calamites (an extinct relative of modern herbaceous horsetails), giant tree ferns and other enormous plants, plus proportionally large insects. The conditions during the intervening millennia were just right for the plants to break down into iron-based minerals, including pyrophyllite and kaolinite, leaving a coating of white powder over the impressions in the rock. In rare spots, the iron minerals come in yellow, orange or red, too. All this makes the fossils stand out in sharp contrast to the dark, gray shale matrix. This is not a place for the timid. The shale is on a steep, slick slope covered in loose scree. The trees that look like good hand-holds are dead and rotten. Below the surface, fires burn in the coal veins, creating a sinkhole hazard all over the ghost town and on to the neighboring towns. However, the place I was hunting is definitely a beaten path these days, so there is probably a low risk of invisible disaster. I always say that no rock is worth your life, but that doesn't stop me from living a little dangerously. I went there for the first time last month. It was a short stop close to dusk. The fog was thick and the rocks were wet. The white powder was hard to make out in the gloom. Today, the light was good, the rocks were dry and the hunting was good!
  2. Found this antiquing. Was only marked "petrified rock"..It is black & charcoal gray in color with a vertical ribbed texture and some rounded ends. Measures 6.5" tall x 5.5" x 4" and weighs 8lbs 1.1 oz. Is it petrified wood ? Petrified cactus? Or something else? It's only letting me upload 1 photo. Took pics with phone and guess their too big. Will try to post more.
  3. Calamites

    From the album Massachusetts Fossils

    Calamites sp. Found in 2018 in North Attleborough, Massachusetts.
  4. Megalichthys of Illinois

    Yesterday i found a very rare Megalichthys jaw with dozens of teeth still attached in the Carboniferous of Illinois, USA. This is possibly the best known example of this fish found in Illinois. Not sure yet though. I still need to do more research. You can see four larger teeth in cross-section on the matrix waiting to be prepped out. Then there are smaller teeth in-between the larger ones, maybe 4× smaller. I also found several large scales. I'll attach the best one. All of this material still needs a proper repair and prep job. The preservation on this material is just stunning. I'm not sure it could get much better. These bone fragments and scales are often found with Orthacanthus teeth and Calamites. So it gives us such a beautiful snapshot of the environment at the time. Just awesome! Happy hunting
  5. Megalichthys Linocut Print

    On finding a Megalichthys scale fossil from the Late Carboniferous in my local stream I designed, carved and printed a lino-block of the carnivorous freshwater fish. In the same slab of rock that the scale was found were Lepidodendron and Calamites fossils that would have been deposited at the bottom of the coal swamp. I would like to have thought of this fish hiding in the murky waters alongside these plants and I based my reconstruction on this. I plan to do a series of three including Rhizodopsis and Rhabdoderma, alongside their respective surrounding vegetation. Credit where credit is due the general proportions and pose of the fish are based on a reconstruction by ДиБгд as seen on Megalichthys' Wikipedia page.
  6. Hi all, My friends recently visited Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia. While they were there they went on a fossil hunt with a geologist who curates the local museum. They were told that they could collect the small, loose stuff, and so brought back plenty of nice fossils. They gave a couple specimens to me, and I’m just wondering about IDing them. There are a lot of Calamites fossils among what they brought back, but I’m having trouble with the rest. I live in the Ordovician and don’t have a lot of experience with Carboniferous flora except finding a few pretties in Pittsburgh. First pic (1) has what they were told is an early seed cone. Can anyone corroborate and specify species? I was looking at Lepidostrobus but the shape seems different. Second pic (2) is one of the fossils they gave me. They thought that the top left might be part of a seed cone but I think it’s Annularia. Thoughts? And are those oval-shaped leaves Pecopteris ? Alethopteris ? And just for fun, I’ll add a couple more pictures (see comments) if anyone wants to have at it. Anyways, thanks!
  7. Nice walk on Chicago lakefront

    I was taking a walk with the family on the lakefront, we notice tons of quarry rock they dropped along areas of the shoreline. Crawled over a few looking at tons of coral and shell fossils and came across a nice chunk of limestone with tons of Crinoid stems. We also found a few other pieces, looks to be Calamites or Cordaites principalis... Any ideas?
  8. Hey guys. This is a pretty random selection of the Carboniferous fossils that my kids and I have collected. I have a lot at about this quality, and some better ones but we'd rather not sell them if we can help it. I hadn't planned on selling any of them, but life throws you curve balls and here we are. Whoever responds to this, thank you so much.
  9. Calamite-Fossil-18& a half inches-long

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Fossil Blue Creek Seam, North central Alabama Pennsylvanian Age (~ 320 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  10. Calamite-Fossil-18& a half inches-long

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Fossil Blue Creek Seam, North central Alabama Pennsylvanian Age (~ 320 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  11. Calamite-Fossil-18& a half inches-long

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Fossil Blue Creek Seam, North central Alabama Pennsylvanian Age (~ 320 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  12. Calamite-Fossil-18& a half inches-long

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Fossil Blue Creek Seam, North central Alabama Pennsylvanian Age (~ 320 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  13. Found this ages ago just lying alongside the road in Illinois... I think it was Illinois... heh... structure looks similar to a calamites horsetail IMO, but the symmetrical succession of the parts is curious. Any ideas?
  14. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  15. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  16. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photos 1, 2 and 3 show obverse; photo 4 reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  17. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photos 1, 2 and 3 show obverse; photo 4 reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  18. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photos 1, 2 and 3 show obverse; photo 4 reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  19. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photos 1, 2 and 3 show obverse; photo 4 reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  20. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  21. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photo 1 & 2 show obverse; photo 3 shows reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  22. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photo 1 & 2 show obverse; photo 3 shows reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  23. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photo 1 & 2 show obverse; photo 3 shows reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  24. Calamites

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  25. Calamites

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
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