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Found 220 results

  1. Hey guys, new collector looking for some wisdom. Over the past year, I've collected over 150 Fossil specimens from the Chatham-Kent Area. The Majority of my collection is Middle-Devonian Corals and Brachiopods, but I've also found some Petrified Wood and Fossilized Bone. I'm at the point where I can't keep track of my collection and want to start labeling and identifying my fossils for documentation and display purposes. What resources do you guys use to identify fossils you've collected in the field? How accurate can I realistically date things?
  2. Dinosaur or Mammal bone ID help

    I found this on the bank of the Red Deer River in Alberta Canada. I have no idea what it's from. I have never found a fossilized bone before. Does anyone have any ideas? Not sure if it could be from a Dinosaur or a mammal like a young mammoth or something. I would love to get some ideas on this one. I am willing to answer any questions or take new photos if needed.
  3. Any idea what this is?

    Hello! This (potential?) fossil was found down at lake Huron by Goderich Ontario, Canada. It was given to me by someone else because the pattern is reminiscent of a spider web. I'm more of an arachnid collector than a fossil collector, so I have no idea where to begin with this one! I hoped someone would have an idea of what it is, if it's a fossil at all! It's about 1 inch and 1/3rd in diameter, and roughly one half 2/3rds of an inch 'tall' when laid flat. It may be difficult to tell from the images, but the 'front' dips inwards towards the center. I hope that helps in addition to the images.
  4. The Royal Tyrrell Museum

    I had recommended going through the Royal Tyrrell Museum to a friend from Kansas last year in September and he was very impressed (I wondered if it was just because he couldn't get out and golf in the snow). This year I went with my 9 year old Granddaughter who didn't sound like she wanted to go. Long story short, we spent a whole day there. I was sort of surprised when I heard they only have 1/2 of 1 percent of the the collection on display. I can only guess that they have a huge warehouse someplace with the rest of the collection catalogued and stored.
  5. Hi all! I managed to go on 3 large fossil hunting trips this weekend and pulled in easily the BIGGEST haul so far with the most variety as well! The first two pictures were from Mimico creek and the rest were a mix of Humber river and a separate section of Mimico creek. I managed to pull in my second trilobite from the area so that was very exciting! Also pulled a bunch of stuff that I was not able to identify: /\ This was the haul from last Friday night /\ This is the trilobite I found!!! Very excited to have a second one - its been a while since the last one I found /\ This was the full haul for the weekend trip at Mimico and Humber /\ Some Orthoconic Nautiloids as usual. Although it seems that this isn't just the same species I usually find as some of the patterns were much smoother than what I usually find A couple decent looking Crinoid stalks /\ /\ Lots of different shells this time, with a nice range of lined shells as well as 'mussel' looking shells (don't know the scientific names for these ones yet - sorry :/) /\ A close-up of the real nicely defined deathbed of TONS of shells! Unfortunately the hammer I used for cracking bounced off this rock and mashed my thumb in so that wasn't very fun. But its healing up nicely so I'd say it was worth it haha /\ Variety different sizes of coral (if you guys could help me identify which type that would be sweet!) /\ These were the weird ones. I'm not even sure if these are even fossils but I figured I might as well take em just in case - better safe than sorry!! (I am posting these two in identification later!) I was very proud of this haul! Lots of diversity compared to the usual hunt which is nice because I'm kind of getting a little tired of the mountains of Nautiloids we have piling up in the collection Let me know what you guys think of these ones!!! -Em
  6. Hi. I have heard of Precambrian stromatolites found in the Precambrian rocks of Ontario but I am curious, has there been any reports of Ediacaran or Mistaken Point- like fossils being found in the Canadian Shield of Ontario?
  7. Paleofavosites asper

    From the album Hamilton, Ontario Fossils

    Paleofavosites asper (d’Orbigny, 1850). Coral squashed on grey shale. Found in the Manitoulin Formation of the Cataract Group on the Niagara Escarpment. Locality is the Devil’s Punchbowl, Stoney Creek, Hamilton, Ontario. Early Silurian.
  8. Toronto creek - big haul

    Location: Etobicoke creek, Toronto, CA Date collected: July 27th, 2019 Hello! I pulled in a whole bunch of fossils along the Etobicoke creek (a little bit further north compared to my last trip - almost same location though). LOTS of Orthoconic Nautiloids (as usual), a couple different bivalves and a few crinoid fragments. This is the nautiloid haul. The top right one doesn't look like much but there are about 5 or 6 nautiloids embedded in the matrix! I'm considering learning how to clean up the fossils so that I can show it off in all its glory! These are the bivalves and other stuff collected. These are two separate MASSIVE chunks of monster Nautiloids (~5cm in diameter) - hopefully I can clean this one up as it would make a veryyy nice shelf piece! Closeup on the full bivalve, I've never really found a complete bivalve with both shells in one clump like this before (correct me if its actually just a lame rock - I could be wrong). I thought this one was really interesting: notice the dark brown, lined layer just under the rocky outer layer? I've seen a good lot of Orthoconic Nautiloids but I haven't seen a layer like this before. Maybe its nothing but I thought it might be worth looking into - let me know if you guys have any info, or what you think! Anyways thats what I pulled in this past weekend! I'd say its a decent haul, not my nicest stuff but still a good lot. -Em
  9. Hi all! I've been active in the field for a bit but I've been MIA for a while, dealing with personal life. BUT I have come back online. Have some adventures I have yet to post. So if you're curious about the geology of that part of the world from the eyes of this Canadian hobbit, swing by my blog. Don't be shy and subscribe if you want to keep updated. I'll try to add some of the blog info in this forum too so that I can reach as many folks as possible so they can see the amazing stuff in my backyard. Blog URL: https://redleafz.blogspot.com Thanks!! - Keenan p.s. Little preview:
  10. Found this one last week in the South pit at Hungry Hollow near Arkona, Ontario. I did a bunch of searching but couldn't narrow this one down. Devonian age Widder fm Hungry Hollow member Measures 2.25 x 2.0 x 1.5 cm
  11. Arkona Crinoid prep

    Here is a Corocrinus calypso I found in the south pit at Hungry Hollow last fall (southern Ontario, Canada, Devonian age). In the past these were a common find in the Arkona formation, but access to the productive outcrops is becoming rare. I stumbled upon this one on top of the northern end of the pit. Sitting there in ten pieces and eroding away, I was lucky to have found it before it turned to dust. The matrix is more solid than the usual clay which makes up the Arkona so I believe it was weathering out of a concretion. I glued the bits that obviously fit together and it ended up in a box with my other Arkona keepers. Two weeks ago I was looking through the collection and decided to prep one of the nicer chunks. After messing around for an hour or so I realized that everything fit together into one piece. Cool! There are some gaps as the edges are worn but I'll take it. Most of my prep experience has been on E. rana from Penn Dixie which are usually quite sturdy and forgiving (I'm not very patient but luckily have not ruined a fossil yet). With this probably being my favourite find to date, it was time to turn down the psi and take my time. I think it is coming along nicely after seven or eight hours of work. Planning to spend another seven hours on it this week to finish it off. Not a lengthy prep for some, but certainly my longest so far.
  12. Belochthus orthokolus

    From the album Echinoderm Collection

    Belochthus orthokolus (Bell, 1976). Found in the Verulam formation, Gamebridge, Ontario, Canada. Middle Ordovician. Obtained online as a purchase. The edrio is about 1.8 cm long.
  13. Pentameroides subrectus

    From the album Hamilton, Ontario Fossils

    Pentameroides subrectus (Hall and Clarke, 1892). Found on a road cut along the Niagara Escarpment in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Reynales Formation, Clinton Group. Silurian, Llandovery epoch, Telychian age. Size is approximately 10 cm across.
  14. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/new-elasmosaur-fossils-vancouver-island-1.5206062?cmp=rss
  15. Arkona 07/06/2019

    As usual I had the urge to go fossil hunting this weekend so I decided to take a trip to Arkona and have a relaxing day of surface collecting. It was calling for rain all week but turned out to be a nice day (aside from the brutal heat and swarming deer flies). Things were looking a little different this year. Spring hit this roadway to one of the pits pretty hard. Critters everywhere so you have to watch your step. There were loads of tiny toads that must have just grown up and left the water. Also found this poor strawberry plant struggling on top of a hill in poor soil but somehow managed to fruit And now for the fossils... I didn't have any luck finding the blastoid or crinoid I was after but I did take a few things home. Some corals Aulocystis ramosa, Platyaxum frondosum Favosites sp. A brach species I didnt have yet and a large Callipleura Nucleospira concinna, Callipleura nobilis An interesting bryozoan and a cluster of tube worms unknown bryozoan, Spirorbis sp. Gastropods Platyceras bucculentum, Naticonema lineata Possible arthropod trackway? And a new trilo species for me. Beaten up but I'll take it. The cephalon+partial thorax look like Basidechenella Pseudodechenella arkonensis. The pygidium looks like Crassiproetus crassimarginatus (top one was found last year).
  16. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7216989/Gemstone-miners-Canada-accidentally-stumbled-fossil-ancient-sea-monster.html https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/canadian-gemstone-miners-discover-prehistoric-sea-monster-skeleton
  17. Marine fossils?

    Hello, I found what I believe are marine fossils, but I have not been able to identify them thus far. I'm hoping I might find some help here. The photo lighting isnt the best, but I hope there is enough info here to help. These were all picked up in October 2018, on Vancouver Island in BC, Canada. The area is the Comox valley, and found in shale. The fossils found in this region are marine species from the Cretaceous period. Fossil 1: This was picked up along the Trent River, above the Trent Falls (about 150 yards following the river back up stream from the falls). The area is south of the town of Courtenay. It was found with the 'point' down in some harder rock that accompanies the shale formation there. It was loose enough that I was able to pick this out after tapping along the edges with a chisel. The fossil is not wet in photos. The 'point' is smooth, for the most part, and shiny. Bottom view - What I seen when I found it: Close up of bottom: Top view of 'point' - This was the part embedded in the stone, point down: Side view: Another side view: A couple of close ups of the point:
  18. Grasslands National Park, in south Saskatchewan, will be having five days in August where small groups of 12 people can go to digs with paleontologists from the Royal Saskatchewan Museum (RSM), and McGill University. See the link below if you might be interested: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/sk/grasslands/activ/ff1 I'm thinking about it, but it is almost a 3.5 hour drive to the location for myself.
  19. I thought I would share this info for those in Saskatchewan, Canada, wondering about the permit required to legally collect fossils in this province. I requested information from the provincial government, and this is what I have been provided with: A permit is required for collecting fossils in Saskatchewan. The “Palaeontological Avocational Applications” can be found here: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/residents/parks-culture-heritage-and-sport/heritage-conservation-and-commemoration/archaeology/palaeontological-avocational-applications On this webpage, you will find the palaeontological permit application, as well as another form to record what you found (a Saskatchewan Palaeontological Resource Record form). With the permit application form, the main points we need you to answer is the location(s) of where you are intending to look for fossils, what you are looking for and how you will do that – covered in section 1 and section 2 (in section 2 you can go into a lot more detail in the attached proposal). We also require you to submit a map(s) showing these proposed locations. If you are unclear about any of the information asked for in the permit application, our office can help you find out some information. A little bit more information about our permitting process: - Once the application is submitted, a palaeontologist will review the information and determine if your proposed collecting locations are in conflict with other known palaeontological sites. - On the permit, there will be a number of Terms and Conditions regarding keeping detailed records for each specimen collected as well as what you did and observed. - All collected material must be submitted to the Royal Saskatchewan Museum (RSM) and the RSM will retain the fossils that are scientificially important specimens. Palaeontological collections are the property of the Crown and are under the stewardship of the RSM, but a disposition certificate can be issued to you for those the RSM will not retain. Hopefully that answers some of your questions. So, there we have it. The link does mention that this is intended for professional paleontologists with a Master's or Phd. For those of you that do not require a permit...I envy you.
  20. A news story about the description of fossil hyena teeth from Yukon Territory in Canada is available online: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190618070804.htm The discovery of fossil hyena teeth in Canada fills a gap in understanding the presence of fossil hyenas in the Midwest, showing that extinct hyenas entered North America from Mongolia via Beringia.
  21. Fossils?

    I'm very new to fossil collecting and would like to check if these rocks are fossils. My apartment was built in the 80s and is currently undergoing massive construction due to the rapidly deteriorating structure of the building. I was given permission by strata to collect a few rocks from the discard pile and I came up with these. https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1l7M5NQVfFNXUXIxwqfopnE_wnq1kCiijePd5yEZRyRI/edit?usp=sharing
  22. Hello, hello! I'll be posting in the member introduction next, but I thought I would do this first. I am a Saskatchewan-ian, but have only ever found two fossils in Saskatchewan. A small limestone bivalve imprint in the Swift Current creek, Swift Current; and a nice sized 3/4 ammolite shell south of Gull Lake, in a pasture (I don't remember the exact location). I have found most of my collection in BC (Vancouver island, Comox valley), but am unsure where to begin here at home. I have read over our major fossil finds, T-Rex for the win!, but unsure where to begin. I have heard, and now read here, that Lake Diefenbaker is a good location to start. Other than that basic location, I really haven't learned much about the types of mineral formations I should be looking for. If anyone has any tips to help me begin my fossil hunting journey here at home, I would really appreciate the help.
  23. Orygmaspis spinula trilobites

    You know I'm feeling better when I'm hitting me auction sites again. Just picked up this nice I will death plate with about 14 Orygmaspis spinula trilobites and a couple Kendallina sp. Late Cambrian. Canada. McKay Group Formation British Columbia The trilobites are mostly 1/4 inch. The matrix is 2 1/2 inch by 3 1/2 inch. I'm not sure what it is but I usually prefer multideath plates of trilobites vs single trilobites. I don't always buy on that way because multi displace always cost more.
  24. Brantford, Ontario Geology??

    Hey guys, So I discovered there is actually GO transit service from Hamilton, Ontario to Brantford, Ontario and Im actually excited to discover this (HOORAY!!). Does anyone know the geology of the city? Im also looking for papers/files that can help me know what to find there. Thanks for any help!
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