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Found 299 results

  1. Hello to all! Hope everyone is doing well, cause after my recent finds I am definitely doing well . So a little backstory: 10 years ago in grade school when I used to collect fossils with my father, we would never find any good fossils in shale. Always layer upon layer of the bland gray rocks with nothing even close to a fossil. For the longest time I never even bothered glancing at the large sections of shale dotting the many rivers of Toronto. jump ahead to the beginning of the month when I read some posts from @JUAN EMMANUEL showing some very nice nautiloids from shale. At first I didn't think anything of it and figured I'd never find anything THAT nice in shale. But, jump to a week later: While exploring a new location, I happen across a large section of layered shale on the riverbank and figured I'd try my luck - and started doing some digging. I pretty quickly came across a shell. A second shell. Then a third, fourth, fifth, and after chipping back the layer I found dozens of very tightly knit shells to my surprise. I was shocked to find anything after thinking for years that Toronto shale held almost nothing of interest. But still - they were ambonychia shells which I already have plenty of in my collection. So I keep looking around and chipping away at other layers, thinking maybe I'll find something a little more exciting. An hour goes by while digging in a somewhat awkward position, and my legs start to fall asleep so I readjusted my legs and out of the corner of my eye I noticed something right near my knee. My heart absolutely skipped a beat as I realized what I had found: A perfect and complete trilobite in the shale. After taking a closer look I realized there was in fact TWO of them right near each other! I hadn't found a trilobyte of this quality since grade school when I used to go with my father - let alone two. I just sat there for about 2 minutes staring at them, thinking they were going to shatter as soon as my pick got anywhere near them. Ultimately, luck played in my favour and the trilobites came out perfectly! But, the story doesn't end there, oh no! So now I'm going back to all these old places, primed with the fresh new knowledge of how to hunt shale. Although the work is pretty messy and uncomfortable, it seems to pay off quite nicely. And before I know it, a couple days later I end up finding yet another trilobite. But the crown jewel of the month came last weekend when I found two different nautiloids - one being an absolute MONSTER specimen, and the other being my most complete nautiloid ever (it even included the tip at the very end!). I just gotta give a big thanks to the people on this forum. Without the knowledge shared on this forum, I would likely have still been stuck in my ways avoiding any piece of shale in sight. I also have also included some other fossils that I found this month. [All fossils found in Humber, Etobicoke and Mimico river/creeks riverbanks - located in Toronto ON, Canada // Georgian Bay Formation // Ordovician (485.4 - 443.8Ma)] The first set of trilobites In Situ from humber river. The first two trilobites on the left and the later one on the right. The many pieces of nautiloid that came out during extraction. They unfortunately broke VERY easily so I figured there was no point stressing about it coming out in less than a dozen pieces. Here is what it looked like when all the pieces were assembled together (with the help of a little super glue of course). It even seems to have the very tip of the nautiloid as well (which would be a first for me)! here are a couple other decent pieces I found as well:
  2. Hi there, I found a number of fossils in the riverbanks of the Don River in Sunnybrook Park in Toronto, Ontario Canada. Here is a google maps link to the spot where these fossils were located. It is just north of where the pin is dropped. https://goo.gl/maps/yBbyfVTwHY3SGbbM8 I've attached images of the fossils I found and I'm looking to ID them. I'm wondering if someone could also point me in the direction of some further reading about the geology in this area. Thanks very much!
  3. Meet Cambroraster falcatus, the sediment-sifting ‘Roomba’ of the Cambrian This crustacean-like critter stalked the seas half a billion years ago. Katherine Wu, NOVA,, July 30, 2019 Moysiuk, J. and Caron, J.B., 2019. A new hurdiid from the Burgess Shale evinces the exploitation of Cambrian infaunal food sources. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 286 (1908), p.20191079. Open access Proceedings of the Royal Society B PDF Brantford Lapidary and Mineral Society PDF Sun, Z., Zeng, H. and Zhao, F., Occurrence of the hurdiid radiodont Cambroraster in the middle Cambrian (Wuliuan) Mantou Formation of North China. Journal of Paleontology, 1(6), p.2. More research by Fangchen Zhao Liu, Y., Lerosey-Aubril, R., Audo, D., Zhai, D., Mai, H. and Ortega-Hernández, J., 2020. Occurrence of the eudemersal radiodont Cambroraster in the early Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte and the diversity of hurdiid ecomorphotypes. Geological Magazine, pp.1-7. Open access Pates, S., Botting, J.P., McCobb, L.M. and Muir, L.A., 2020. A miniature Ordovician hurdiid from Wales demonstrates the adaptability of Radiodonta. Royal Society Open Science, 7(6), p.200459. Open access Yours, Paul H.
  4. Hello! I recently decide to split a fossil that seemed to have the edge of a shell poking out. To my surprise, it split open to reveal something I have never seen before in all my years hunting in Toronto. I thought perhaps it might have been the head of an unusual trilobite, but I am not convinced for sure. It was found on the riverside deposits of Etobicoke creek in Toronto, Canada, which is part of the Georgian Bay formation. Let me know what you guys think @Malcolmt @Monica @JUAN EMMANUEL:
  5. Oye I managed to get my hands on some very rare stuff (at least in terms of my local area) while hunting this last month in the Georgian Bay Formation in Toronto, Canada. Some of these fossils have been some of the nicest I've ever found, and will probably look even better with a little cleaning. Let's start things off with the usual nautiloids with a side of bivalves: Treptoceras crebriseptum I love these plates so much - they are currently some of my favourite fossils in my whole collection at the moment Treptoceras crebriseptum for the first three, the one on the far right might be a different species as it has a unique spiralling pattern.... Some MASSIVE nautiloid chambers, the biggest I've ever seen!!! A bunch of Rafinesquina brachiopods (I think). These are usually somewhat rare but I've found a lot recently so that is pretty cool A couple Ambonychia and what I believe are Pholadomorpha pholadiformis. A close up one the Pholadomorpha pholadiformis in the middle - one of the most exceptionally well preserved specimen I have ever seen!!!!
  6. What are these?

  7. Bison bones?

    Hey guys, friend of mine found these bones in Calgary/Alberta while excavating near the river (about 5ish m deep). I figured the head looks like bison, but not sure about the rest of bones. And how old they might be. And anyone knows what’s that white stuff inside of one of the bones? Like calcified bone marrow? Any opinion would be greatly appreciated!!
  8. ID required for Cretaceous fossil

    Hi! I'm new here. I found this fossil recently near Drumheller, Alberta Canada. I think it's a vertebrae but I can't seem find example images of anything like it due to its asymmetrical shape. It was found near both other marine (bi-valve) fossils and other bone fragments. Not sure if it comes from a dinosaur or marine reptile. Thanks for your help! Cheers, Matt
  9. Hello all! Here are some of my my favourite scenery and fossil pictures from the last few weeks! Decided to hit up some new spots way up in the north end of Toronto along the Humber river - which yielded some very nice shells and crinoid segment (instead of the usual nautiloids). I'm in the midst of getting the weird nautiloid section so stay tuned: Lets kick things off with a couple very pretty shells and crinoids from the north end trip: the 7 shells from the left are Ambonychia, with the two black right shells being Pholadomorpha pholadiformis (I believe). Some crinoid segments on the far right These Ambonychia shells were definitely my favourites of the bunch^ When it comes to crinoids, this is about as good as it gets here in Toronto!!!! Almost nobody finds calyxes here, so this is about as good as it gets!
  10. Tyrannosaur tooth

    Hi I’m wondering what are your thoughts on this Tyrannosaur tooth? It’s 1.25 inches and is from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta.
  11. Hello all! So I've been looking through my collection and noticed a bunch of fossils that I haven't yet identified yet. Some of them are quite peculiar, as I've never seen some of them until now. This'll be a long post with 12 different fossils in need of a name so brace yourselves hahah: All fossils found in Toronto creeks - Ordovician Era - Georgian Bay Formation 1. I thought this was the typical Treptoceras crebriseptum that I always find at my local creek, but when I cracked it out from the matrix I noticed it was perfectly smooth. Maybe its the living chamber of the nautiloid? 2. I honestly have NO clue what this is. Never seen anything like it. I thought it was nothing, but it seems to have such a defined symmetrical shape... ...
  12. can’t figure out what I found

    Hi I am jacob, was wondering if someone could help ID or have an idea what this could be. i found this on shore of Lake Superior tarrace Bay Area, 3 inches below surface of small-med sized round rocks( o ya if it looks like little dried blood on back cause I cut myself on broken glass while looking for it)
  13. Please identify

    i found this rock in the drainage swale in front of my house in Upper Golden Grove, New Brunswick, Canada. The rock split open and there appears to be an imprint of something inside. Is this something of interest? Thanks!
  14. Horse tooth?

    Our grandkids first found this by the lake, Lake Huron. Ontario, canada side. We have been told our lot had a horse trail that ran through it, possible even used for horse races. Interested if this is an ancient horse tooth? Bison is another possibility as this had been a wooded area near the lake. Thank you. We are always looking for interesting rocks and stones and were curious when we found these. I have more photos.
  15. Can someone help me identify this?

    I recently found this piece of bone in Horseshoe Canyon in Dinosaur National Park, Alberta. I don’t know what it is. Also, if I could get some tips to clean it, that would be good.
  16. Hello! It was found in the Georgian Bay Formation - Ordovician period, in West Toronto. It was found after cracking some rocks on the riverbanks of Etobicoke creek. I recently came across a rather peculiar fossil, I initially though it might have been an ammonite, but those didn't exist until much later than the Ordovician period. It seems to be slightly ribbed, with a bit of a spine.
  17. Took A Long Hike Today

    I wanted to try some new spots that are closer to home, so a family here was nice enough to take me out to their land near Dinosaur Provincial Park and allow me to surface collect. I only kept two things (wasted a good portion of the day searching for tyrannosaur teeth to no avail) but I did find some neat stuff so I thought I’d share. Please excuse the circling and the caption, those were for Instagram. Nice & green this time of year. Won’t look like that for long. Heres something I found a few times today; random pits of petrified wood just shattered. Here’s a good 10 inch chunk that I kept. More petrified wood. Dino bones. Most of them were broken and difficult to tell what they were, as the dinosaur park area bones usually are. Please excuse the circling. It was for Instagram. This was the largest bone I seen today, was over 2 feet long most likely but it was at an awkward place so I didn’t climb any higher to get close. Excuse the caption. This one was fairly large as well. This one I kept because it was one of the only good condition bones that wouldn’t require excavation. Hadrosaur toe bone. (thanks jpc for the help)
  18. Hello again! Sorry for the constant posts, but I've been finding a lot of amazing stuff recently! Anyways, as the title says, this was probably one of my best hauls ever for a single day! I managed to find over a dozen different nautiloid chunks and was able to extract toooooons of super well defined and complete brachiopods from a matrix piece!! This will be another 3 part post as i have lots of pictures: Here was the full haul for the day, with ruler for reference (notches in cm). Here are some alternate angles of the nautiloids. I going to assume/believe they are mostly, if not all Treptoceras Crebriseptum, but if anyone notices any different species I'd be glad to know! some nice crinoid stem segments, a Pholadomorpha Pholadiformis and Ambonychia plate, and another decent nautiloid.
  19. Another classic trip

    Another decent haul over the last few days. Bunch of nautiloids and whatnot, a couple mussels. These were my favourites from the last 2 days in the river. This was a biiiiig nautiloid, and after cleaning it I realized there were two of them! wowowowo! (Sorry the picture didn't turn out quite that nice) This is probably one of my highest quality specimen so far, although it did break near the end when extracting it from the matrix.
  20. Dinosaur Provincial Park 2018

    Today two years ago I was in Dinosaur Provincial Park! So I just wanted to share some photos from when I was there. Here is a Ceratopsian indet leg bone Here is me beside the leg bone Next is a footprint from a Hadrosaur indet from a trackway
  21. Wowowow I was very surprised to find all this amazing stuff today at my favourite river bank fossils spot of the Etobicoke creek. I managed to snag a whole lot of stuff today, some Orthoconic Nautiloids, Brachipods and what I believe to be the nicest tentaculite I've ever seen!!! The fossils are from the Georgian Bay Formation and they were found in the broken up "rock fields" next to the creek. This is going to be one of my longer posts, so I will have to split them up into section. The full haul, with the typical estwing 22 ounce rock pick (33 cm from bottom of the handle to the top of the hammer end for anyone who doesn't own one). First lets start with the usual: Them cone boys, aka Orthoconic Nautiloids. I believe all of the following to be Treptoceras crebriseptum.
  22. what is this?

    We live approx. 3kms from the Pipestone Creek bone bed. I volunteer in the lab at the museum once in a while. My grandkids and I were snooping around in our rock pile (we built on our acreage in 2001), that we piled up as we did the new build and cleaned up the yard. We found this weird rock. I left a message with Derek and emailed a couple of pics to him as well. Have not heard from anyone as yet. Just thought that I would share and ask what this is? It weighs between 16 and 17 pounds and is approx. 24cm long.
  23. Help in ID of unusual shaped fossil

    Hello, I recently cracked open a rock to find one the most pristine and unusually shaped fossils I've seen in a looong time. I predict it might be the edge of a bivalve shell poking out, but I wanted to know what others might have to say about this. It was found in the rock deposits of the rivers in Toronto, Canada, and is part of the Georgian bay formation. Also, only the bottom half seems to be completely crystallized and is translucent, whereas the top is relatively opaque: I am somewhat worried about totally ruining the fossil if I try to further crack into the matrix, as it is Ordovician era rock which is very hard and often results in the destruction of the specimen when trying to clean up the fossils. Sorry for not providing much to go off of . Thanks in advanced for the help! -Em
  24. Hello to all! Its been a very long time since I've been on here, but my recent trips around the creeks in Toronto, Canada (in the Etobicoke area) have yielded some of my largest and most defined finds of all time, here are some of the nicest Orthoconic Nautiloids I had found yet: Probably the nicest one in my collection at this moment, found almost completely by fluke when I hit a rock with my pick and this bad boy showed up Imprint made by the previous one These last couple would be way nicer, if only I could find a way to get it out of the rock matrix without completely destroying the specimen :/ ... Anyways, it good to be back and hunting this summer after a somewhat stressful finals season. I also have wayyyyyy more stuff that I found such as some unusually large and defined bivalves and tentaculites (maybe?), but I might save those for another time as they definitely weren't as cool as these ones. All were found along river rock deposits In the west side of Toronto (Etobicoke, Humber and Mimico creek) - Georgian Bay formation, excavated using rock pick and chisel.
  25. Hip?

    St. Mary Formation. Southeast Alberta, Canada. I found these 2 on the sides of 2 very steep hills separated by a valley.
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