Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Canada'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 183 results

  1. Last summer, on the last day of a long weekend of backcountry fossil hunting around Lake Diefenbaker, Saskatchewan, my friend and I decided to stop our canoe at a beach where on a previous morning I had found a large baculites cuneatus specimen. This beach was an outcropping of a unit of the Bearpaw formation known as the Demaine sand, and dated roughly to the late Campanian. The locality was chock full of golfball to softball-sized nodules, each with a delicate, coalified fossil inside, ranging from crustacean parts, chips of driftwood, to loose vertebrae. It wasn't long before I was looking down at a split nodule containing the symmetrical lines I knew were a skull. So of course, I assembled it together as best as I could, wrapped it in a sock, and we loaded back into the boat to head home. Some typical terrain in the area. The formerly glacial South Saskatchewan River carves deep into the marine clays and sands of the Bearpaw formation: The nodule, rather unceremoniously wrapped in a wool sock: And unwrapped. Note the cervical vertebra just above the posterior end of the skull, and how part of the end of the snout is missing (sorry about the lack of scale bar, there's a photo further down the post with proper scale): I sent a photo to a paleontologist friend, and was quickly referred to the Royal Saskatchewan Museum, who of course were eager to accept the fossil (not to mention that I was technically legally obliged to hand it over, per the Saskatchewan Heritage Property Act... But it's what I wanted to do anyway!). About a month later, my friend and I met with two other paleontologists down at Lake Diefenbaker to deliver the fossil (this time more carefully wrapped in a shoebox...) and to show them the site where we had found it. One long and wet trip in the zodiac raft later, we were there. We assisted in the collection of more samples, this time coming up with an even broader variety of flora and fauna, including a small crinoid, some wood chips with amber, and some more decapods. One of the two paleontologists was excited to suggest that the locality probably represented a near-shore lagoon environment, and that the museum would likely be back to do some more work there at a later date. Unfortunately, we were unable to do so that summer because of the seasonally rising water levels of the lake, which flooded the site, but I've been told that my friend and I will be invited to assist with the operation again this following season. As for the fossil, it has since been delivered to McGill University to be CT scanned. Apparently, distinguishing the bone from the matrix has been long and tedious work, and not much news has reached us since the specimen was delivered some time last September. Here is an individual slice from the CT scan, from near the back of the braincase - notice how porous the bone material is, which is apparently another indicator that this skull belonged to a juvenile: I have been in close correspondence with the paleontologist from the Royal Sask. Museum who will be writing the paper to describe the find, but everything is more or less at a standstill until the work on the CT scan is finished. It's been a rather long wait, but I'm looking forward to its publication - I have been told that the museum intends to hold a press conference after the specimen has been described, and that my friend and I will be credited and involved in the reveal. So far, the museum has kept everything about the discovery deliberately vague, aside from a brief mention in a press conference, which informed an article that circulated around the Canadian media late last summer: https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/scientists-in-saskatchewan-discover-new-multimillion-year-old-fossils It's been an exciting and fulfilling experience overall, and I can't wait to get back into the field, this time with a more meticulous and careful attitude, knowing that there's scientific potential to be had from my future contributions. Anyway, here are some more photos from the lab at the RSM, with scale bar: Decapod claw: Crinoid crown: Thanks for your attention.
  2. Dimetrodon footprints found on P.E.I. bring Island to 'world stage' of paleontology https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-fossil-footprints-discovered-cavendish-park-1.5027811 Laura Macneil discovered the footprints on this rock in Cavendish in May. (Isabella Zavarise/CBC)
  3. Starting as a shark tooth collector a long time ago, last year I became interested in dinosaur fossils and decided to start collecting them. Despite dinosaur material, especially from rare locations, being usually very expensive for a college student, over this year I managed to get some interesting specimens through numerous trades, sales and purchases, some of which I want to organize in this topic. So, let's begin with Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian). All of my material from this time comes from Cloverly formation in Montana and Wyoming. Tenontosaurus tilleti - a large basal ornithopod, I have tooth and a vertebra with ?bite marks And a rare Nodosaurid tooth - Sauropelta is the only one described, although there could potentially be more than one species Cenomanian stage (early Late Cretaceous) is not that well represented in North American dinosaur fossil record, I have a hadrosaur and dromaeosaurid teeth from Woodbine formation, Texas A very significant portion of dinosaur fossils from North America comes from Campanian deposits of various stages. Let's begin with Judith river formation in Montana. Got some nice theropods - Tyrannosauridae indet. (potentially present Daspletosaurus and Gorgosaurus cannot be differentiated based on teeth) on the left and Saurornitholestes sp. on the right. And a nice Ceratopsian tooth (again, cannot be identified to the genus level, too many of them present) There is another formation in Montana of a similar age - Two Medicine formation. Recently got some nice material from there I can show here. First, a maxillary tooth from a hadrosaur Gryposaurus latidens - easily identifiable by the presence of denticles near the crown apex. Unidentified hadrosaur tooth with a complete root
  4. Sam Lawrence Park, Hamilton, Ontario

    I was looking back at my pictures I took in the summer and I realized I forgot to share pics of a park I discovered up on Hamilton’s Mountain with nice exposures of rock formations of the Niagara Escarpment. The park is called the Sam Lawrence Park at Concession Street which is just south of Hamilton’s downtown core. The park has a walk where one can see a nice view of the downtown Hamilton skyline. This walk at Arkledun Avenue is a popular photography destination and quite breath-taking on a good day.
  5. Canadian hashplate

    Last spring I was given a box full of Canadian goodness from our very own ,Kane. He came down for a TFF group hunt at Deep Springs. There were many nice specimens in the box, but my favorite is this hashplate. I believe this is from Hungry Hollow, Arkona Ontario. It appears to have Coral, bryzoans, crinoid, and brachs and possibly other goodies. I am going to try to take some close-ups in a few minutes and would appreciate any feedback as to what you see that maybe my eyes don't
  6. Fossil?

    Appears to be mineral deposits of some sort, however the spiral shape of the mineral makes it look fossily. Matrix is 4"x4"x6", very dense, hardness around 5. Found in a river near Grand Cache, Alberta. Any ideas?
  7. Honeycomb tube-like structures?

    Keep finding examples of these honeycomb/tubular structures, what could they be?
  8. Is this a type of coral?

    Something I've found around Clear Creek while hiking. Any ideas as to what this might be? Obviously some sort of shell, but from when?
  9. Another fossil ID from Ontario

    One of my most recent finds, nothing I can recognize, is it some sort of plant?
  10. Fossils found in southern Ontario

    A selection of one of the fossils I've found in and around Clear Creek while hiking. Any ideas as to what this might be?
  11. A new, startling revelation you may find interesting: https://canadianmuseumofnature.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/triceratops-skull/ The skin impression found on a Triceratops skull found by Charles Sternberg in Saskatchewan, Canada, is quite a surprising discovery, potentially giving people an idea of what the skin of Triceratops looked like, because no other Triceratops specimen has skin impressions preserved. The Tyrannosaurus rex skin impression found last year isn't too far from how T. rex is depicted in children's movies, and the newly discovered Triceratops skin impression may or may not be close to how kids illustrate Triceratops, while giving clues to what ceratopsid skin looked like.
  12. Vertebrae fossil ID help

    Was looking for some input and ideas on what this would belong to. Not much information available and the pictures are not the best. But even your “best guess” is appreciated. The entire specimen is about 3 feet in length. The possible collection location is guessed to be around the Milk River area in Canada close to the Montana border. That’s all I have available to me. So please let me know your thoughts. Thank you.
  13. Canadian Hadrosaurid ungual

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    Saurolophinae? (Saurolophus osborni?)
  14. Brachiopod from Canada

    Hey everyone, Nearly forgot to post this little beautiful dude in the Fossil ID section. I got this as a gift from the Geo-Oss fair some time ago. The only info I have on this little spiriferid brachiopod is that it’s from Canada. Now, this is probably a long shot, but I was wondering if anyone maybe recognized which location, formation and age correspond to this little dude? If the species is also recognizable that’s awesome. There were a LOT of the spiriferids in that box, all seemingly of the same species, so it’s a location at which these brachiopods are common. Anyone have a clue? Maybe one of you guys @Tidgy's Dad @Wrangellian @Peat Burns? Thanks in advance! Max
  15. Strange rock

    I found this rock in Southern Ontario buried in the dirt in my front yard. I kept it because it thought it had a neat design and now I am wondering whether it is a fossil and what type. The size is 3 cm tall with a 3 cm diameter.
  16. Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni.
  17. Triarthrus eatoni

    Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni. Found in association with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, Brachiopods, Cephalopods, and Graptolites. The Cephalon is slightly disarticulated, likely from molting.
  18. Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside three other T. eatoni and one T. rougensis. Both eyes are preserved.
  19. Triarthrus rougensis

    Both genal spines are present. Right side of cephalon is slightly pyritized. Found associated with T. spinosus, T. eatoni, cephalopods, and graptolites.
  20. Triarthrus spinosus

    Ventrally preserved. Both genal spines and one thoracic spine are present. Hyostome slightly visible. Found associated with T. eatoni, T. rougensis, cephalopods and graptolites.
  21. Triarthrus spinosus

    Found associated with T. eatoni, T. rougensis, cephalopods, and graptolites. Impression of right genal spine is present. Right side of cephalon is slightly pyritized.
  22. Corals? Echinoid?

    Either corals or echinoids are my best guess here. More of mom's stuff from Pelee Island, Canada.
  23. Hi there, Posting here after hours and hours of research and not being able to find any answers. In around 1974, my mother was walking up a small river on or near the border between southern Alberta and southern BC, Canada, and she stumbled across what looked like a smooth, polished rock. She picked it up, and realized it was a rather large canine tooth from an animal. She thought it was a bear tooth, which I don't agree with - doesn't seem to be the right shape. She brought it to a jeweller and had it capped with silver and made into a pendant. The jeweller said it was the hardest thing he'd ever drilled into and broke several bits trying... The curvature and strange twist of the tooth have thrown me off in my search, but I have a suspicion that its potentially from a large Mountain Lion, or possibly a large Wolf. Any help here would be greatly appreciated! Attached are photos. Thank you!
  24. Good afternoon Paleontology afficiandos! A long time ago my friends and I were hanging out in an old open pit quarry in Nepean, Ontario, Canada (South Ottawa) and I found this little fossil. The quarry was quite deep, about 10-15 meters, so its difficult to put a depth for the find, especially since it came from a rock pile near the upper rim. Originally this find had been sitting flat on a much larger piece of rock however there were no other visible fossils on the surface layer. When I pointed this out to my friends, they 'hilariously' decided it should be pushed over the edge to explode on the quarry floor below -.- Luckily I was able to pick through the chunks and find it eventually, unscathed. What is shown in the picture is everything that was found in situ on the original rock. I then brought it home and promptly forgot about it for several years. I unearthed it again while doing a thorough house cleaning and figured I should ask the experts!
×