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Found 319 results

  1. Eurypterid ID help

    I was given this Eurypterid fossil a while back and I was looking to see if anyone had any ideas towards a species, i’ve got no idea where it came from other than somewhere in the New England/Canada area. Someone has told me it looks like an Adelophthalamus but id like some more opinions. Thank you
  2. Fossil sponge?

    Phylum Porifera (sponge) M. Odovician Bobcaygeon Formation Kirkfield, Ontario. Cananda 4.5 cm long This is another from an old collection as found. Wrapped with a number tag to match a hand writ-in entry. The sponges I have shows some formation. I will put it in the ultrasonic cleaner. What do you think, do the come smooth? Bob
  3. Hi, I found 2 large fossils on th e shores of Lake Erie Ontario and I do not have a clue what they are. Both of these fossils are approximately 24" in diameter. Can someone identify them?
  4. Mesotrypa prolifica  

    Bryozoan Mesotrypa prolifica Lindsay Formation Bowmanville, On.Canada Reference comment below date, Posted March 24, 2010
  5. unknown crinoid?

    Unknown possibly collected in the 1960's. Looks crinoid related. M. Odovician Verulam Fm. Gamebridge, ON Canada 4 cm w x 4 cm
  6. Hey guys! My first scientific publication has just been released online by the journal Geological Magazine in association with Cambridge University Press (see link below). My study describes the first probable deinonychosaur tracks from Canada, which my colleagues and I found and documented at a large dinosaur tracksite (about 72.5 million years old) near the city of Grande Prairie in Alberta, Canada. Four traces occur in possible trackway association, while another isolated track that is in exactly the same direction is located nearby on the same bedding plane, suggestive of at least two individuals (although we cannot say whether any sort of pack behavior was occurring). The two most complete tracks are didactyl, meaning they preserve only two toe impressions. Based on this, the size of the tracks and their occurrence within dinosaur-bearing strata of Late Cretaceous age, we conclude the tracks most likely pertain to a small deinonychosaur of some kind as these dinosaurs walked primarily on digits III and IV, with the second toe (digit II) being raised off the ground and bearing the enlarged "killing claw". Based on the relative shortness of digit IV compared to digit III in our new tracks, we also suggest the trackmakers were more likely to be troodontids rather than dromaeosaurids, as troodontids generally possessed a digit IV that was somewhat shorter than that of a typical dromaeosaurid. Within the rocks where these tracks were found (in Unit 4 of the Wapiti Formation), teeth of troodontids are fairly common at some sites, so although the discovery of their tracks is certainly novel it was also not completely unexpected. The paper is paywalled, i apologize for that, which is why i have provided a short summary above. If you are studying at an educational institution though you may be able to gain access that way. Probable deinonychosaur tracks from the Upper Cretaceous Wapiti Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada | Geological Magazine | Cambridge Core
  7. I found it in a gravel near the road. Please help me identify it.
  8. These came to my personal collection from an auction at a high school that shut down. Normally I prefer to dig my own, but these were too cool to ignore at a buck each. I got lots of other science stuff too! Nothing like picking up a few goodies on the side while buying glassware and microscopy stuff for work!
  9. A pair of Two Medicine Formation teeth

    Hello, Been offered this pair of teeth from Two Medicine--they are labelled as Albertosaurus juvenile, but, unless I'm mistaken, Alberto isn't from there? Could they be juvie Daspleto/Gorgosaurus, or are they raptor teeth? I am guessing it would be difficult with these to narrow it down beyond Tyrannosaur or raptor. I've got a pic of the bases if that helps. They are very small --- black one is 8mm, white one is 1cm. Black one is I think a premax tooth. One pic shows 3 teeth--but it's the middle black and the white one on the right that I am interested in and requested extra photos of. Thanks for any help.
  10. Another Quarry Find

    Found another cool piece at work today- is it anything special? It came out of a load of rubble from the Milton Quarry, in Milton, Ontario.
  11. Quarry Find

    Hello! Found these cool pieces while at work- they came from the Milton Quarry in Milton, Ontario, Canada. I am completely new to fossil identification, but am very interested to learn more! Can anyone tell me what these might be?
  12. A 12-year-old found a 69 million-year-old dinosaur fossil while hiking with his dad By David Williams, CNN, October 16, 2020 Twelve-year old boy finds dinosaur fossil at Nature Conservancy of Canada Horseshoe Canyon site, October 15, 2020, Calgary, AB Yours, Paul H.
  13. Hadrosaur in Canada.

    From BBC News : https://www.bbc.com/news/election-us-2020-54547987
  14. I am posting some pics of my trip to Etobicoke, Ontario on the Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member. I only went a couple times to different localities in Etobicoke since the lockdown put a strain on my wanted public transportation service. I visited the Humber River and Mimico Creek. I only came home with 2 specimens from the Humber while I didnt take anything home from Mimico. This year's winter has been mild so that is why I believe there has not been any turn around for [good/unusual/extraordinary] material. I recall back in 2015, which had a rough and severe winter, generated more good fossils for me than this year's mild winter. I didnt have to do a lot of digging and just surface collecting just to find good specimens when the winter is rough before the following Spring and Summer. The ice didnt form thick and did not cause any strong erosion in the creeks in my opinion. These pics are from the Humber River This right below is a partial Treptoceras crebiseptum I collected along the bank. Sorry for the blurry pic, this one is a Pholadomorpha pholadoformis.
  15. Partial Trilobite Fossil Found

    Hi - this is my first post to this group. I found this partial trilobite fossil this past summer in Ordovician limestone near Eganville, Ontario, Canada and I am hoping that someone here can help me identify the trilobite species it belongs to. This piece measures 3.5 inches in length by a little over 2.5 inches wide and I believe it is the pygidium and most of the thorax (so a little more than half of the full trilobite). Also, it has a little over 1/2 inch in depth, so it is not completely crushed flat. I would have much rather found a full trilobite - and I do have a full trilobite that I found that I am having prepped, that I will post at a later date - but I am very happy with the size and condition of this sample. I broke it out of the rock in this condition - no prepping has been done to this sample. Any thoughts?
  16. Another Pleistocene Leg Bone?

    Greetings All I was hiking about 1km from where I found a Paleo Horse Metacarpal last week (Thanks so much for the rapid ID!!) when I found this in the gravel. It appears to be a leg bone but I have not been able to ID it so far. It is a little beat up and weathered but I hope someone can help me figure out what it is. Any help would be appreciated. Best Regards Rob
  17. Crinoid (?) Fossil ID Needed

    Found this the other day in Eastern Ontario and I'm not quite sure what it is. I asked on reddit and someone suggested it could possibly be a crinoid holdfast, but I wanted to get a second opinion just to be sure. Ordovician, about 2.5cm in diameter.
  18. For ancient deep-sea plankton, a long decline before extinction University of Buffalo, Press release by Charlotte Hsu Sheets, H.D., Mitchell, C.E., Melchin, M.J., Loxton, J., Štorch, P., Carlucci, K.L. and Hawkins, A.D., 2016. Graptolite community responses to global climate change and the Late Ordovician mass extinction. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(30), pp.8380-8385. Researchgate PDF for above paper Related publications Yours, Paul H.
  19. Hey all! Hopefully the pics are decent enough. I found this odd looking rock at my feet while out fishing in a creek in South Eastern British Columbia in the East Kootenays region. Any insight or info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
  20. Hello to all! Hope everyone is doing well, cause after my recent finds I am definitely doing well . So a little backstory: 10 years ago in grade school when I used to collect fossils with my father, we would never find any good fossils in shale. Always layer upon layer of the bland gray rocks with nothing even close to a fossil. For the longest time I never even bothered glancing at the large sections of shale dotting the many rivers of Toronto. jump ahead to the beginning of the month when I read some posts from @JUAN EMMANUEL showing some very nice nautiloids from shale. At first I didn't think anything of it and figured I'd never find anything THAT nice in shale. But, jump to a week later: While exploring a new location, I happen across a large section of layered shale on the riverbank and figured I'd try my luck - and started doing some digging. I pretty quickly came across a shell. A second shell. Then a third, fourth, fifth, and after chipping back the layer I found dozens of very tightly knit shells to my surprise. I was shocked to find anything after thinking for years that Toronto shale held almost nothing of interest. But still - they were ambonychia shells which I already have plenty of in my collection. So I keep looking around and chipping away at other layers, thinking maybe I'll find something a little more exciting. An hour goes by while digging in a somewhat awkward position, and my legs start to fall asleep so I readjusted my legs and out of the corner of my eye I noticed something right near my knee. My heart absolutely skipped a beat as I realized what I had found: A perfect and complete trilobite in the shale. After taking a closer look I realized there was in fact TWO of them right near each other! I hadn't found a trilobyte of this quality since grade school when I used to go with my father - let alone two. I just sat there for about 2 minutes staring at them, thinking they were going to shatter as soon as my pick got anywhere near them. Ultimately, luck played in my favour and the trilobites came out perfectly! But, the story doesn't end there, oh no! So now I'm going back to all these old places, primed with the fresh new knowledge of how to hunt shale. Although the work is pretty messy and uncomfortable, it seems to pay off quite nicely. And before I know it, a couple days later I end up finding yet another trilobite. But the crown jewel of the month came last weekend when I found two different nautiloids - one being an absolute MONSTER specimen, and the other being my most complete nautiloid ever (it even included the tip at the very end!). I just gotta give a big thanks to the people on this forum. Without the knowledge shared on this forum, I would likely have still been stuck in my ways avoiding any piece of shale in sight. I also have also included some other fossils that I found this month. [All fossils found in Humber, Etobicoke and Mimico river/creeks riverbanks - located in Toronto ON, Canada // Georgian Bay Formation // Ordovician (485.4 - 443.8Ma)] The first set of trilobites In Situ from humber river. The first two trilobites on the left and the later one on the right. The many pieces of nautiloid that came out during extraction. They unfortunately broke VERY easily so I figured there was no point stressing about it coming out in less than a dozen pieces. Here is what it looked like when all the pieces were assembled together (with the help of a little super glue of course). It even seems to have the very tip of the nautiloid as well (which would be a first for me)! here are a couple other decent pieces I found as well:
  21. Hi there, I found a number of fossils in the riverbanks of the Don River in Sunnybrook Park in Toronto, Ontario Canada. Here is a google maps link to the spot where these fossils were located. It is just north of where the pin is dropped. https://goo.gl/maps/yBbyfVTwHY3SGbbM8 I've attached images of the fossils I found and I'm looking to ID them. I'm wondering if someone could also point me in the direction of some further reading about the geology in this area. Thanks very much!
  22. Meet Cambroraster falcatus, the sediment-sifting ‘Roomba’ of the Cambrian This crustacean-like critter stalked the seas half a billion years ago. Katherine Wu, NOVA,, July 30, 2019 Moysiuk, J. and Caron, J.B., 2019. A new hurdiid from the Burgess Shale evinces the exploitation of Cambrian infaunal food sources. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 286 (1908), p.20191079. Open access Proceedings of the Royal Society B PDF Brantford Lapidary and Mineral Society PDF Sun, Z., Zeng, H. and Zhao, F., Occurrence of the hurdiid radiodont Cambroraster in the middle Cambrian (Wuliuan) Mantou Formation of North China. Journal of Paleontology, 1(6), p.2. More research by Fangchen Zhao Liu, Y., Lerosey-Aubril, R., Audo, D., Zhai, D., Mai, H. and Ortega-Hernández, J., 2020. Occurrence of the eudemersal radiodont Cambroraster in the early Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte and the diversity of hurdiid ecomorphotypes. Geological Magazine, pp.1-7. Open access Pates, S., Botting, J.P., McCobb, L.M. and Muir, L.A., 2020. A miniature Ordovician hurdiid from Wales demonstrates the adaptability of Radiodonta. Royal Society Open Science, 7(6), p.200459. Open access Yours, Paul H.
  23. Hello! I recently decide to split a fossil that seemed to have the edge of a shell poking out. To my surprise, it split open to reveal something I have never seen before in all my years hunting in Toronto. I thought perhaps it might have been the head of an unusual trilobite, but I am not convinced for sure. It was found on the riverside deposits of Etobicoke creek in Toronto, Canada, which is part of the Georgian Bay formation. Let me know what you guys think @Malcolmt @Monica @JUAN EMMANUEL:
  24. Oye I managed to get my hands on some very rare stuff (at least in terms of my local area) while hunting this last month in the Georgian Bay Formation in Toronto, Canada. Some of these fossils have been some of the nicest I've ever found, and will probably look even better with a little cleaning. Let's start things off with the usual nautiloids with a side of bivalves: Treptoceras crebriseptum I love these plates so much - they are currently some of my favourite fossils in my whole collection at the moment Treptoceras crebriseptum for the first three, the one on the far right might be a different species as it has a unique spiralling pattern.... Some MASSIVE nautiloid chambers, the biggest I've ever seen!!! A bunch of Rafinesquina brachiopods (I think). These are usually somewhat rare but I've found a lot recently so that is pretty cool A couple Ambonychia and what I believe are Pholadomorpha pholadiformis. A close up one the Pholadomorpha pholadiformis in the middle - one of the most exceptionally well preserved specimen I have ever seen!!!!
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