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Found 594 results

  1. I just found this imprint on carboniferous claystone in Bochum-Weitmar and was wondering what made it. It's probably from the Bochum Formation
  2. Plant trunk cortex for ID

    I want to submit for identification the specimen below. It came from the Carboniferous of Leon, Spain, labeled as tree trunk cortex. There are no other informations available. Any thought of what might be exactly, or a more precise ID will be welcomed. Thank you.
  3. ? Productus moorefieldanus Girty

    From the album Invertebrates

    ? Productus moorefieldanus Girty Early Carboniferous Heath Shale Formation Bear Gulch Fergus County Montana USA
  4. I made a page on Facebook with all my carboniferous finds and hunts in this stage,i show also all the carboniferous fossils i had from friends (many exchanges) I made also few pictures in french museums Hope it could help to ID ,if somebody could have other carboniferous fossils,i will be always glad to exchange https://www.facebook.com/pg/Dalmanites-Nala-1926592597599034/photos/?ref=page_internal https://www.facebook.com/Dalmanites-Nala-1926592597599034/
  5. I'm back in IL for spring break this week, and thought it was about time I went down to Mazon Creek. I've never been there before, but have read quite a lot of trip reports others have posted and felt prepared. I parked right off of 5000N at Monster Lake to start. I walked around the lake for about an hour, but found nothing resembling a concretion. There were an insane number of rocks eroding from the slopes, but I saw nothing of interest. I then headed about a third of the way down the gravel road and decided to check out the area near a "Fossil Hunting Area" sign. I walked near there for about half and hour, but the grass was too dense to see the ground at all. I then headed right across to the other side of the road and up a large hill. Here's my car from the top. I spent an hour or so combing the ridge, but still found no nodules. I thought about venturing down into the valley, but it was quite steep and didn't feel comfortable doing so alone. Finally, I drove another third or so down the road until I spotted exposed clay. I wandered around this area for an hour and a half. I was getting somewhat frustrated at this point, so I got on my hands and knees and crawled through the brush, hoping that being closer to the ground would give me better luck.
  6. Fossil hunting season at Illinois's Mazonia-Braidwood State Fish and Wildlife Area, the iconic Pit 11, runs from March to September every year. I didn't make it to the park at all last year, so I wanted to get out there on day 1 this year. I took the day off work and thankfully the weather cooperated- it was cloudy and in the 30s for most of the day. I picked up my rental car at 7:30 in the morning and hit the road for the 90 minute drive north. I wasn't the first one at the park, though- I saw a few other folks heading out on the trail with buckets in hand as I pulled into the parking lot off 5000 N Rd. Although I have been to Mazonia about 6 times in the last 5 years, I am still finding my way around the overgrown landscape of the park. I started out with an area I had been to before, and had some early success. Unfortunately, I followed that by wandering off to explore a new area, lugging my heavy bucket through heavy brush for 2 hours with almost no success. That (and the fact that I was in the early stages of a head cold) led me to taking it easy in the afternoon. I was only able to add a few more concretions to my bucket, but the sun did peek out briefly towards the end of the day resulting in some lovely panoramas from up on top of a ridge. I was able to chat briefly with another fossil hunter when I got back to the parking lot about the joys and tribulations of fossil hunting at Mazonia- we discussed the hard work necessary in order to have a chance to open an incredible window into a 300 million year old world, and how we wouldn't trade that chance for anything. I finished the day at the former tipple on the western side of the park, wide open ridges of dumped waste from the former mine that remain inhospitable to plant life to this day. It is an alien looking world, and usually has not been a great spot for finding fossils. However, it is easy to access at least and I was actually happy to come across a few rough bark impressions in sandstone that I picked up. The sun was getting low, so I decided to call it a day. I only collected about 1 1/2 gallons of concretions, but I was still glad I could get out to the park and find something. I will put my finds in the next post.
  7. Pennsylvanian tooth

    Hi, I found this tooth the other day near Starved Rock, Illinois. Pennsylvanian deposit, Livingston limestone. I can't seem to find a match. It's missing some bits, any ideas from the paleozoic shark experts? It measures about 7mm
  8. Dear TFF Members, I would like to ask your help with identification of my recent Carboniferous finds: 1 2 3 4 5
  9. Mid-winter plants

    Last week I went to Silesia region, which is famous for coal mines - and of course heaps of coal to go through. First I went to Knurów, which has an active mine - but they let hunters browse the fresh output Here are some of the finds:
  10. Caridosuctor populosum Lund & Lund, 1984

    From the album Vertebrates

    Caridosuctor populosum Lund & Lund, 1984 Heath Shale Formation Early Carboniferous Serpukhovian Bear Gulch Montana USA
  11. I went last weekend for a new carboniferous hunt with few nice finds
  12. Lepidodendron (?) Bark

    I found this in Bochum-Weitmar, should be carboniferous. Is it a lepidodendron? Greetings!
  13. Carboniferous unknown

    Hell All I was going through some micro-matrix from the quarry in Soignies when I found this tiny object. I'm not sure it's a fossil but I wanted to check and it seems to be too symmetrical to be geologic. The piece is 2,5 mm in size. It's found in marine deposits togheter with crinoid parts, trilobites... It's from the Tournaisian (Carboniferous). What do you all think? Picture one shows one side and the second picture the opposite side. It's round and nearly perfectly symmetrical. Thanks already
  14. Last fall the state of Illinois purchased over 2,600 acres near the town of Oglesby from Lone Star Industries, including former quarries, with the goal of making it into state park land. It is near the site of the popular Starved Rock and Matthiessen State Parks, and the state said it would take a few years to assess and prepare the site before it would be open to the public. http://www.newstrib.com/free/matthiessen-and-starved-rock-just-got-a-lot-bigger-video/article_203e37f8-d89a-11e8-9a7e-e72ef52ec0d6.html The quarry exposes the highly fossiliferous LaSalle Limestone, as well as a black shale that produces fossils too, so a number of scientists and fossil enthusiasts proposed that a portion of the new protected land should be made into a public fossil park- here is their proposal: https://www.esconi.org/files/proposal-for-a-fossil-park-at-the-former-lone-star-quarry-site-final.pdf Now a state legislator representing the area has introduced a bill to do just that- the synopsis reads: "Amends the Department of Natural Resources (Conservation) Law of the Civil Administrative Code of Illinois. Provides that the Department of Natural Resources shall designate a portion of the former Lone Star Quarry site near Oglesby as a fossil park to allow for the collection of fossils. Provides that Department by rule may designate which portion of the land shall constitute the fossil park and any requirements for admittance or permits for entry into the fossil park. Provides that the Department may collaborate with any State university to establish educational opportunities or events at the fossil park." Hopefully this will become a law and this park can join the famous Mazonia-Braidwood as Illinois's second park for fossil collecting. If you are an Illinois resident, please contact your state representative and tell them to sign on as co-sponsor or support this bill!
  15. Plate of armor?

    Hey guys! I was in one of my favorite Pennsylvanian spots in East Kansas finding the usual brachs and bryos when all of a sudden this popped out at me. Any ideas as to what it might be? I’ve never seen something like this in my area before. Thanks.
  16. This was found in Hamlin wV in a layer of sandstone approx 614 ft above see level it looks to be calamite but the needles or whatever you call them around the stem seem to close together. Theres a pop bottle cap up top for reference to size or whatever u call it Soda bottle cap in your area of the country. This came from my back yard theres a rock outcrop at the base of this hill and every square inch of this rock is smashed plant material like it was a leading edge of a flash flood how it carrys all the plants trees and trash that it picks up in that thick slurry cause 10 ft up and 20ft over theres nothing but mud notice that hollow stem there on the right
  17. Our shark adaptation education program for elementary students follows up the Cladodonts with three of the craziest looking early sharks and three that we think kids will love learning about. The Eugeneodontid "sharks" may not be sharks but they are just too cool not to teach the kids about. Bizarre is interesting and I also love talking about evolutionary extremes. The best part of these next animals is that they each allow my son to really stretch out as an artist and create some weird looking creatures. The kids will learn that Edestus were large, predatory shark-like fish that are related to modern ratfish. We will quickly cover the tooth whorl which is where the term Scissor-tooth comes from. I have been reading theories as to how the teeth were used and I think it will be fun to discuss possible feeding methods with the kids. We will not spend much time on Listracanthus because there is not much information about them. I have seen them described as being eel-like and covered in the "feather" denticles. This is one that is really about the artwork so my son is the star with this species. Can not wait to see his finished rendition. I think the kids will really love Stethacanthus. I know it is a cladodont but we separate it in the presentation. The Anvil Shark is a wild creature. The anvil shaped, denticle covered spine, patch of spine on its head, and the whip-like projections from the pectoral fins are adaptations that are open to debate. Asking open ended questions with this species will be more fun than giving the kids theories. What do you think the spines were used for and what do you think those whips are all about? The kids will guide the presentation about Stethacanthus. While we wont be adding any additional Cladodont fossils any time soon, I do hope to add either Caseodus or Campodus to our collection before the end of spring. I like the Eugeneodontids as artistic subjects for my son so we will pick up more of these fossils as we progress. Our presentation fossils Pic 1- Edestus heinrichi. This is an Illinois coal mine fossil, dated to between 360-320 mya. Another personal favorite. These are not common and it is pretty cool to be able to show this one to students. Pic 2- Listracanthus. A "feather" denticle from the Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian in Iowa. Not the best example as it is difficult to see but a good photograph will help. Still it is cool just to have the Feather Shark in the program ! Pic 3- Stethacanthus altonesis. One of the two teeth we have from the Caney Shale Formation in Oklahoma. Again, it is just too cool to have Stethacanthus fossils. I do not know how rare they are or anything but it is just such a freaky little creature.
  18. My son and I are doing our first Shark Adaptation classroom education program in March. We are using fossils from across the timeline of sharks to explain to the students how sharks have managed to stick around this planet for some 430 or so million years. I am very proud of the relatively small fossil shark collection we have. The kids will get to see and in a lot of cases handle some fossils from badass sharks. I thought it would be fun to put some of that collection and bits of the information we present. Eventually I will include the art work my son is producing. He is 5 months away from graduating high school so I limit his time on this art while he works his final art projects for school. The first shark we cover is also one of the most fun for me. The Cladodont sharks are pretty cool and as I recently learned present a perfect opportunity to utilize them in two different spots in our presentation. They start off the program because of Cladoselache. They were not the first shark but they are the basic design for sharks that would be recognizable to 3rd and 4th grade students. They had body type that modern sharks use and they had some fearsome looking teeth. They may be really small teeth but they were deadly if you were a small fish. Science thought these little sharks went extinct during the Great Dying but in 2013 that theory was proven wrong. There were Cladodont teeth found in France that dated to 120 million years ago. They survived the Permian by moving to deeper waters. The small shallow water sharks apparently became very successful as smaller deep water sharks. The physical adaptations are important but the adaptive behavior of sharks is a huge part of how sharks have survived for so long. We only get a few minutes on each shark so that is the basic stuff we will tell the kiddos. Here are the teeth. Pic 1- the unidentified Cladodont tooth. I love this tooth. It is one of my favorites. Under the micro eye, it looks so freaking cool. It could be a Symmorium. It could be something else. It might even be something new. It is from Russia and dated to 320 million years. This will get donated for research at some point. Pic 2- Cladodus belifer. A Mississippian tooth from Biggsville Quarry in Illinois.
  19. Wispy Mazon Creek Plant?

    This fossil split a few weeks ago and it has me puzzled. It's from the Mazon River itself and consists of many wispy fibers, with some carbonization at the tips. The edges of a Neuropteris fimbriata leaf have a frayed look that is sort of similar, but the rest doesn't look right. Another possibility I considered was it being some sort of highly degraded non-specific fibrous plant material. But I have not been able to find anything that matches it exactly in my guidebooks. Any ideas?
  20. Strange Formation On Road Cut

    This on a high wall on a road cut along side of the end of rt 34 in Hamlin Lincoln CO WV, its about 20 ft above the road about 625ft above see level and about 60ft above the mud river am i correct in assuming that this hole was caused by a torrent of water whipping that boulder around inside there its about the size of a medicine ball. Ive seen these on the bottoms of creeks but never up on hillside like that. What kind of flow would it take to do this as far as feet per second i know theres a formula just cant think of it
  21. Ok, what do you guys think of these?

    I’ve got some ID requests that need to be solved. First (#1) an old friend that needs to be re-evaluated I think. I know this to be solidly mid to late Cambrian in age which leads me to believe its some kind of ichofossil perhaps Cruziana. What are your thoughts?
  22. My first fossil and I'm already stumped - hoping someone can point me in the right direction here! My husband is a geologist and brought a piece of shale home with a fossil poking out. I've been chipping away inexpertly, and can't figure out what I'm looking at. This was found outside Birmingham Alabama, in the Mary Lee Formation, near the Pratt Seam. My husband tells me the area was freshwater swamp during the Pennsylvanian Period. What am I looking at here? I know it shouldn't be soft tissue, but it doesn't seem to be plant, shell, or bone, either! Please set me straight! I hope these pictures are ok - as you can see, I'm not done cleaning it... but I'm trying to be cautious since I'm learning as I go. Also possibly relevant: the shale was riddled with dark colored fossil plants. My husband said they were carbon - they nearly disintegrate on contact. I've included a picture of those, too. Here are pictures of the plant fossils in the rock that were exposed when we broke it apart. The mystery fossil is on the top of the left rock. Thank you all!
  23. CP petrified wood

    a new side of pertrified wood in north china. every where scattered. May fall off the cliff on to cars passing by beneath. big or thin one can not step into the same river for a second time, but a log could lay down in water again, after 300 million years. the vascular tissue under scope
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