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Found 871 results

  1. Fossil conifer?

    Hi all, I found this piece of mudstone at Besom Hill in Oldham, near Manchester. The rocks here are Upper Carboniferous in age. One side has unusual lineations, but not the type caused by bedding as seen in the shales that are very common in the area. The reverse side is typical of the mudstones found here. I'm thinking it's a fragment of Walchia trunk, though there isn't any mention of Walchia in any literature or by any other collectors. Does anyone have any suggestions? Cheers Yuanls
  2. Air Breathing Sea Scorpion

    Main respiratory organ could breathe air. Carboniferous fossil studied. http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/adelophthalmus-pyrrhae-08840.html
  3. Found out I had fossils down the street from my house and did some searching for a variety of plant fossils. This was found in a road cut along the Ohio river near Ambridge/Aliquippa, PA and the fossil layer is the Mahoning Shale. Most of what we found were tree ferns, calamites and lycopods. We had some great success and it was great to find these right down the street! Most were easy to ID with help from the Fossil Guy site. But we can't find any info on the attached. Any ideas are welcome!
  4. Found this small oddity while breaking apart limestone. The pitted appearance was interesting. The pits also seem to extend the whole way through. They also appear to wrap at a 90 degree angle on the side that isn't broken. The broken side reveals how they go through. I chipped away a little at the matrix, but didn't go too tough to keep from breaking it. Whole specimen with scale: (stacked photo) Showing outside 90 degree wrapped edge with same appearance: (stacked photo) Broken edge showing channels going through the width. Additional view of the top (unstacked photo)
  5. What species of Calamite is this

    I know these two are Calamites but I’m unsure how to identify the species. They were both found in the North Attleboro part of the Rhode Island formation and I’m thinking the larger one is C. Cistii?
  6. Need help with ID

    I’ve just recently found this fossil in the North Attleboro fossil locality and need help identifying, it is a little bit longer than a half inch
  7. Any ideas as to what this is?

    I’m not sure what this is, if anything it’s about 7/8 of an inch long. I’m not even sure if it is a fossil, or just maybe a torn leaf.
  8. I went yesterday for my last carboniferous hunt summer hunt,sometimes sun but few rain also,with few nice finds Few sphenophyllum A very nice 3d Stigmaria with high details A nice Alethopteris time to climb a little
  9. Hi everyone. I recently visited a quarry at the north of Spain (more specifically a geographical area called "El Bierzo", famous for its fossils from the carboniferous era) and I found the following ones. I think I have identified most of them but I would like to know your opinion. Thank you very much!
  10. Return from long hiatus

    Hello everyone, this is Jonathan (Shin Alpha), I’m currently in college as a paleontology major and I’ve been busy with life as always, my apologies for my inactivity but due to my busy schedule, I’ve been largely inactive. I was able to find some plant fossils at a nearby outcrop in the Middletown/Cromwell area in CT. And I’ve since donated my finds to Central Connecticut state university geology department. that being said I’ve heard of a Paleozoic site in Newport, Rhode Island called “Cory’s lane“. I’d love to go there one of these days when I have the opportunity, but I don’t know too much about it. Or where the site is at specifically. Feel free to comment down below
  11. Hi all, Recently I was collecting at a locality that exposes the Duquesne Limestone and shale, which if you’ve seen any of my previous posts you’ll know that I’ve collected extensively. But for those of you that have not, the Duquesne shale is a layer of black, carbonaceous shale found in areas where the Conemaugh group is exposed. This layer is chalk full of disarticulated vertebrate remains, but some of the most recognizable are the teeth of Orthacanthus and Xenacanthus. These were eel-like sharks that existed from the Devonian-Triassic and had bicuspid or tricuspid teeth. They grew to be about 10-12 feet at the largest and thrived in the swampy lakes of the late Pennsylvanian. It’s somewhat uncommon for me to find a large Orthacanthus tooth (which are tiny compared to Otodus sp. )and it is even rarer for me to find a tooth with feeding damage. It seems to me that, understandably, many collectors of Cenozoic shark teeth are disappointed when they find shark teeth with feeding damage, but for me at least when I find Paleozoic shark teeth with feeding damage it makes it even more special. Last time I was collecting I did just that. Interestingly enough this Orthacanthus compressus tooth is my largest yet and has a very unusual break. The cusp that is missing is not broken cleanly at the enamel, rather, when it broke off it took a good chunk of the rooth with it. To me at least this would indicate that the shark was using quite a bit of force when it bit down, and whatever it bit in to must have been very hard and made for a painful meal for the shark. It’s important to note that the other cusp was damaged recently and isn’t feeding damage. I’m not one to heavily speculate but I’d imagine that it had to have bit in to one of the heavily armored Paleoniscoids for damage of this nature to take place. Or, who knows, the tooth might have just been old. Whatever happened to break the cusp is lost to time, I guess. Regardless, I think it’s a wonderful find and reminds me that these animals were truly alive and had imperfections. Hopefully you all find this as interesting as I do .
  12. Exploding stars may have caused mass extinction on Earth, study shows, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, August 18, 2020 "Killer cosmic rays from nearby supernovae could be the culprit behind at least one mass extinction event, researchers said, and finding certain radioactive isotopes in Earth's rock record could confirm this scenario." The open access paper is: Brian D. Fields, Adrian L. Melott, John Ellis, Adrienne F. Ertel, Brian J. Fry, Bruce S. Lieberman, Zhenghai Liu, Jesse A. Miller, Brian C. Thomas. Supernova triggers for end-Devonian extinctions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2020; 202013774 Yours Paul H.
  13. Is this a fern?

    Found this back in April on a mountain, still amazed by the detail. Not sure what species it is, the area is mostly Carboniferous.
  14. What could this be?

    I found this fossil in the north attleboro part of the rhode island formation, and I need help with an ID. It’s just shy of an inch in length.
  15. Unknown Carboniferous bone

    I found this today in County Durham, UK. It comes from the coal measures (upper Carboniferous). If anyone can identify it that would be great. It measures 55mm long.
  16. Carboniferous plants 1 Eusphenopteris striata Gothan Westphalian Calonne Ricouart France 2 Sphenophyllum(Annularia) Westphalian Calonne Ricouart France 3 Neuropteris and Alethopteris Deccurens Westphalian Calonne Ricouart France 4a Eusphenopteris 4b Pecopteris Westphalian Calonne Ricouart France Fortopteris latifolia Zeiller.and a stem on the reverse Mariopteris
  17. ID - Besom Hill, Oldham

    I went collecting at Besom Hill in Oldham recently, and found some interesting fossils I couldn't identify. The rocks here are are shales from the upper Carboniferous. They don't show up massively well on camera so I've increased the brightness and contrast. The original photos on the left, with edited photos on the right. All apart from specimen A are from what I believe is the Listeri Marine Band. The ruler I used is a mm-cm scale ruler. Specimen A: About 2cm wide, 1.2cm long. I'm unsure of its provenance as it was found it loose in the scree, so I'm unsure whether it is from an animal or plant. The rightmost picture was taken in sunlight to better illustrate its ridge structure. The line down its centre that causes a change in direction of the grooves appears to be a preservational artefact, rather than something biological. Specimen B: - B1 is about 1cm by 1cm. My first thoughts was that it's a fragment of goniatite. - B2 is just under 1cm long. It is a tapering triangular indent into the rock. I've heard you get fin spines at Besom Hill, though I've never seen one for sure and most fossils other fossils in the rock are preserved in 2D. - B3 is slightly over 1cm by 1cm. It's smooth, with broad ridges. In the image, they run downwards diagonally, left to right. I suspect some kind of shell, or carapace. Specimen C: The object that makes up most of the upper centre of the rock. It looks segmented, but it also looks fern-like. I'm not sure what this one is. Specimen D: This one might not be a fossil at all. It contains a small, circular depression within a piece of shale. To my knowledge, it's unusual for a piece of shale to naturally weather like that. Any IDs are appreciated! Some fossils don't show up massively well, even with enhancement. If you need better photos, just ask and I'll redo them. Cheers Yuanls
  18. Carboniferous millipede

    I found this in the South Yorkshire coalfield (UK) recently (upper Carboniferous). I'm 99% sure its a millipede section but would like some second opinions. I suspect this can't be identified to a genus level but if anyone can narrow down the possibilities that would be great, if it is indeed a millipede. Sorry for the lack of a scale, the camera wouldn't focus on the fossil when there was a ruler. It measures 1cm wide. Thanks, Daniel
  19. oddball Pennsylvanian ?alga

    Anyone seen this species or similar? Found in Pennsylvanian spoil piles of central Illinois (near Peoria). Is it part of some kind of alga? Not my find and not my specimen, so these photos are basically what we have to go on. More broadly, can anyone here recommend a Treatise-style taxonomic book detailing known algal heads / macroalgae in the fossil record? Thanks.
  20. Pennsylvanian fossil, any ideas?

    This fossil was found in north attleboro, part of the Rhode Island formation, and the large leaf in the center is around an inch and a half.
  21. Any idea what this is?

    This fossil was found in north attleboro, part of the Rhode Island formation and the largest one is 6 inches in length.
  22. Any idea what this is?

    Any idea what this plant fossil is? It was found in North Attleboro as part of the Rhode Island formation. It’s pennsylvanian in age and just shy of an inch and a half.
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