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Found 457 results

  1. I've not had a chance to post my finds here in a while but over the past few months I've found some new specimens of Lower Carboniferous/Mississippian marine shark teeth I wanted to share! These were collected at various sites in the Midland Valley of Scotland from the Blackhall Limestone, an extensive formation with interesting variations in fauna at each different locality. Ctenoptychius sp. Anterior tooth in lingual view, 6mmx7mm.
  2. Actinocyathus floriformis

    Partly preserved in what I think is ferroan dolomite, with clear calcite in the voids which allows a 3D view of the structure in places. A common cerioid coral at this level, with a wide range of preservations. Formerly Lonsdaleia which is now restricted to branching versions.
  3. CORAL COLONY

    Now, i found this when i was seven or eight years old, on the cut down to the beach at Kilve in Somerset, South West England. It was buried in a band of blue/ grey clay in the Psiloceras planorbis zone of the Blue Lias , Lower Jurassic. Although i'd found many lovely fossils before this was my first exceptional, "WOW!" find. I still don't know what it is and that was 45 years ago. A colonial coral colony yes, but i don't think it can be Liassic? A derived fossil from the Devonian or Carboniferous seems likely, but which one? And it shows very little signs of having been transported huge distances, as it's quite a way to the nearest relevant outcrops of those ages. Here it is :
  4. Mystery Petalodont

    I found this little tooth a few months ago in the Coal Measures (Westphalian A) of Scotland in a fresh/brackish water deposit and thought it might be a Janassa sp. of some sort but now I'm not so sure, the only other Petalodont genus's I'm aware of in the British Coal Measures are Ageleodus and Ctenoptychius but they both have multicuspid crowns, the tooth is in labial view and is 11mm across. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
  5. Alright everyone I'm pretty excited about this one. It's about an inch long and 1 1/2 inches wide.
  6. Mariopteris vs Sphenopteris

    As I am going through my boxes of findings from the Llewellyn formation at St. Clair, PA, I came across some more interesting plates. Normally I would call this short, rounded foliage "Sphenopteris" but some research with the PA Geological Survey's book "Fossil Plants from the Anthracite Coal Fields of Eastern Pennsylvania", General Geology Report 72, 1982, John Oleksyshyn, I'm thinking these might be more accurately called Mariopteris cf. lobata. Here is Figure 14 from the book that illustrates (plates A,B) what I think is a close match to what I have. The book also states that the specimens that are used for the plates come from St. Clair so it is known to occur there. Thoughts?
  7. Lit.: Cater, J., Briggs D. & Clarkson E. (1989): Shrimp-bearing sedimentary successions in the Lower Carboniferous (Dinantian) Cementstone and Oil Shale Groups of northern Britain. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh: Earth Sciences. Issue 1, 1989, p. 5-15 Schram, F. (1979): British Carboniferous Malacostraca. Fieldiana, 1979, Vol 40, p. 1-129 Volume 16: Fossil Fishes of Great Britain, Chapter 9: British Carboniferous fossil fishes sites Site: CHEESE BAY (GCR ID: 2916) Clark, N.D.L. (2013) Tealliocaris: a decapod crustacean from the Carboniferous of Scotland. Palaeodiversity 6:107-133 Jones, W. et al.(2016) The Proof is in the Pouch: Tealliocaris is a Peracarid. Palaeodiversity 9(1):75-88. 2016 https://doi.org/10.18476/pale.v9.a5
  8. Palaeoniscidae indet

    From the album Vertebrates

    Palaeoniscidae indet. "Bigeye" Early Carboniferous Serpukhovian Heath Shale Formation Bear Gulch Fergus County Montana USA
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    FOSSIL STEM CALAMITES SITE LOCATION: Westphalian deposits in the area around Mons in Belgium TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous (311-315 Million Years Ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    FOSSIL STEM CALAMITES SITE LOCATION: Westphalian deposits in the area around Mons in Belgium TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous (311-315 Million Years Ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  11. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    FOSSIL STEM CALAMITES SITE LOCATION: Westphalian deposits in the area around Mons in Belgium TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous (311-315 Million Years Ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  12. I’ve stumbled across similar pieces of limestone throughout the years, but never have been able to figure out what they are. This piece of whatever it is is by far the largest and I honestly don’t have a clue as to what it is. This and similar finds only ever seem to have grooves or striations around the edges and nothing regular (at least to my perception) on the top or bottom which leads me to think they are probably of a geological origin, but I have never come across anything that matches these oddities... As stated in the tags I found this in a creek (near Auburn, Nebraska) which I know complicated things but other pieces of the same (or at least similar) material were from crushed up Oread limestone (Shawnee Group) from the Plattsmouth member which produces Carboniferous fossils. Any help would be appreciated! Curse the attachment size limit!
  13. Hi, These are from an old collection in Israel. We only know that they are from Germany- Carboniferous. Any help would be highly appreciated. Regards. Oz
  14. Cordaicarpus seeds or fish scales?

    Some more items from the Llwellyn formation at St. Clair that I'm trying to pin the ID down on. I have found oodles of these in some layers at St. Clair and the rounded shape makes me think they are Cordaicarpus seeds. However, there is not enough detail for me to be sure. Someone also suggested then could be fish scales but they have no blue tint (which is from the phosphates found in bones and scales) nor ornamentation. Thoughts?
  15. Here are a couple of "old" pieces from St. Clair that I found. The first one is a faint trace that I think is Pectopteris but I find it so rarely at St. Clair I can't tell for sure. What is throwing me off is that the leaflets are getting longer as they progress along the rachis whereas I have always thought that Pectopteris had a consistent leaflet length along the whole leaf. Then the second piece is a cluster of leaves/leaflets that don't match anything I've seen before. The tips of the leaves are not pointed enough for Alethopteris and not wide enough for Neuropteris. Any suggestions are appreciated.
  16. More from the rock garden

    Like the title,more from the landscaping rockbed. I only have Sundays to poke around in it and the rock is very dusty. Really hoping for a good solid rain to rinse it off. Is it OK to ask the husband for a second load for xmas? For some reason I keep getting the 3.95MB warning even tho my files are under limit, is this a common issue? That second one,I'm calling my Harry Potter rock...
  17. Three productids with most of their spines intact, showing that they looked like hedgehogs. I haven't identified them further largely because I can't see the shells properly. (Edit: likely to be Echinoconchus or similar echinoconchid - see below) These are from a Brigantian (Mississippian) mudstone in NE England, Co.Durham. 1) About 6cm across 2) Interior brachial valve showing spines projecting around the edge from behind. About 3cm across. 3) about 4cm across:
  18. Siphonodendron junceum

    Strikingly preserved in an iron-rich hump on a grey limestone, one of the commonest Mississippian corals in the British Isles, France, Belgium, Germany and Russia. Not known from Asia, Africa, Australia or the Americas. Frequently found as an erratic on many parts of the British Isles coast. The simplest and narrowest Siphonodendron species (typically 2.5 - 3.8mm), easy to identify as it has no dissepiments. Central columella present in most corallites, with dome shaped or conical tabulae. Usually sixteen major septa. (14-18 possible) Minor septa may be present. The calcite filling in the voids is transparent and the specimen is varyingly coloured with presumed haematite, highlighting the structure visible below the surface.
  19. Last year, I found a large trunk of a tree at a coal mine heap in the Mazon Creek area. Images of it here and here. A few weeks ago, I found some more parts (a few feet from the original) that look like identical material. One of which is also a large root/trunk. It has an interesting curve shape. Looks like part of a root mantel rising out of the ground. Here's the bottom part. And here's some details of areas of the bottom showing what I assume is adventitious rootlets.
  20. Dibunophyllum bipartitum konincki

    From the album corals

    Section just below top of the calice, showing central lamella and other axial structures continuing into central boss. Great Limestone, Weardale, County Durham, UK.
  21. Dibunophyllum bipartitum konincki

    From the album corals

    Section showing incomplete central lamella. Great Limestone, Weardale, County Durham, UK.
  22. Dibunophyllum bipartitum konincki

    From the album corals

    Section showing incomplete central lamella characteristic of the subspecies konincki. Great Limestone, Weardale, County Durham, UK.
  23. Dibunophyllum bipartitum konincki

    From the album corals

    "Standard" D. bipartitum section showing complete central lamella. Great Limestone, Weardale, County Durham, UK.
  24. Taken from Lund, Richard, and Grogan, E.D., 2005, Bear Gulch web site, www.sju.edu/research/bear_gulch, 14/11/2016, page last updated 2/1/2006: "Heteropetalus elegantulus is an elegantly slim little euchondrocephalan with many different tooth shapes along its jaws. It ranges to only about 4 inches in length. Skull, jaws, and dentition place it close to Debeerius. It is common in the weedier shallow water areas. Male (top) and female (bottom). There are no scales, except for a small patch at the rear of the dorsal fin of males. Lateral line canals of the head are supported by rather large highly modified scales. Heteropetalus has an almost eel-like body, a protocercal tail, rounded and very flexible pectoral fins midway up the sides of the body, and a single long flexible undulatory dorsal fin (preceded by a small fin spine). All these features indicate a maneuverer in weedy or reef-like environments as well as along the bottom. Mature males have a distinctly strengthened, hooked and denticulated posterior end of the dorsal fin; the dorsal fin of males was significantly higher than that of females. This dorsal fin dimorphism is similar to that seen in the Gouramies, modern bony tropical fish available in any pet store. Dorsal view of Heteropetalus elegantulus head They have a very small mouth, with the teeth crowded to the front of the jaws, and a variety of plucking, nipping, and crunching teeth. The jaw suspension itself is rather flexible to give it a certain amount of both lateral and fore-and-aft motion. The bright yellow spots in the dorsal view of a head are the inner ears, and the yellow is from iron oxide particles that were bio-concentrated during the life of this fish. H. elegantulus was originally described as a petalodont, but subsequent discoveries proved it to be otherwise; it is closely related to Debeerius ellefseni." This fish is clearly a male as shown by the claspers. Lit.: Lund, R. 1977 - A new petalodont (Chondrichthyes, Bradyodonti) from the Upper Mississippian of Montana. Annals of Carnegie Museum, 46 (19): 129-155. Grogan E.D. & Lund, R. (2000): Debeerius ellefseni (Fam. Nov., Gen. Nov., Spec. Nov.), an autodiastylic chondrichthyan from the Mississippian Bear Gulch Limestone of Montana (USA), the relationships of the Chondrichthyes, and comments on gnathostome evolution. Journal of Morphology, 243 (3): 219-245.
  25. I've had some luck cracking open my first trove of nodules and my students have found a few cool things too. I haven't ID'd everything yet and would appreciate any suggestions on that topic. I'll be posting more photos as I get through the material. Our collection was carried out at the end of September, 2017 as a part of the Ecology and Evolution class I teach in the Environmental Studies department of Lake Forest College. Here's a jelly from a small nodule that gave up both the positive and negative casts. Here's an awesome polycheate one of my students found. I'm not 100% sure that this is a real fossil. It popped out of the siderite matrix like this but I've seen other nodules with this lighter-colored mineral inside but not taking any organic shape. If I was to guess, this is a Pteriomorphan bivalve of some type but it doesn't look like anything else I've seen online. I sincerely doubt that I am lucky enough to have found an etacystis fossil on my first trip but this thing looks a lot like what I've seen described as such elsewhere. Plenty more to follow, I am totally hooked on this hobby. Dr. John
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