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Found 33 results

  1. Hi all! Perhaps this is a dumb question, but I' still new to the forum as well as the hobby itself, so I offer a teaching moment - In round rock, (just north of austin in central texas), I have a location at the base of a limestone cliff where after some gritty mining efforts I've come across an extremely dense pocket of what I've been informed are internal casts of rudists. That ID was great!, but I'm having trouble learning about what the actual organisms were like. I've tried researching quite a bit with no clear picture of what these are that I'm discovering. Also geologic maps of the area have some disagreement, so the exact spot could be Edwards limestone, eagle ford, or buda limestone. I understand (I think) that these were some variation of a mollusk but the story ends there. Discovering these would be even more magical if I had a proper understanding of what these organisms were like, looked like, and what role they played in their environment while they were living. I know these are a common fossil so many of you will have a wealth of knowledge about these. Please enlighten me, I'd love to learn! Below are some examples for reference:
  2. Is this a fossil?

    I would greatly appreciate any help in identifying this "fossil". This "fossil" was found on the ground in an area where limestone was being dump on the ground for a pad or road. Central Texas; probably Frio county. Thank you.
  3. Hi all, this is my first post so please excuse any mistakes. I found this Specimen in the Canyon Lake area if Central Texas. I haven't tried to remove too much of the limestone until I knew more about what this might be.
  4. Texas Paleontologic Papers Available Online as PDF files Various University of Texas Bulletins, which are available online as PDF files contain in the form of Contributions to Geology, papers about the fossils of Texas. For example, there is: University of Texas Bulletin 4401, Contributions to Geology, 1944 University of Texas Bulletin 4401 contains papers about graptolites from the Cambrian of the Llano Uplift; corals from the Carboniferous of the Llano Uplift; Foraminifera from the Upper Carboniferous; vertebrates from the Triassic, Howard County, Texas; Cretaceous crustaceans from Dallas County; and Pliocene vertebrates from the Texas High Plains. Also, there is University of Texas Bulletin 3945, Contributions to Geology, 1939, which contains Crinoids from the upper Carboniferous and Permian strata in Texas, Raymond Cecil Moore; F. B. Plummer, Univ. Texas Pub. 3945, Dec. 1, 1939, pp. 9-468 Graptolite Faunas of the Marathon Region, West Texas The Ellenburger Group of Central Texas Index to other University of Texas Bulletins and Publications Example of search for "ammonites" in University of Texas Bulletins Yours, Paul H.
  5. Hello all, I'm 19 and brand new to the site, I'm hoping this is where I can get a potential ID on some very interesting fossils a family friend of ours supposedly found 10 minutes east of Austin on their private property. The first of which is a mostly complete fossilized fish - according to this friend of ours, it was found close to a river, where limestone slabs stick out from the eroded bank. As far as I understand, this was from an old bank line rather than the current one. He pulled on of the slabs out from said bank, and on it (after appropriate cleaning), a fish skeleton was found as shown below: An ID to the genus at least would be very appreciated. Secondly, and perhaps more interesting, is a fossilized piece of skin (potentially) I know fewer details about this particular find, but he does say that he found it on the same property. Some other fossil finds he has made (he's not a vigorous hobbyist, he doesn't actively search for these, just passively and on occasion for fun) include some bivalves and the other typical gastropods of the area. Of the photos, he included a picture of a large vertebrae, which I believe may be a mosasaur vert - a find sometimes made in central texas. Anyway, the skin he found is below: I don't have much context for size, my guess is that it's probably about 2 inches (5 cm) in length. Thanks for any ID guesses! I hope I uploaded this in the correct area!
  6. Pterosaur Finger Bone?

    I've been doing a lot of exploration in the Grayson Formation (Lower Cretaceous) exposures south of Waco lately, and so last week I was doing some hunting on a nice marly slope in the South Bosque River. I picked up lots of pyritized heteromorph ammonites and some turritella, but what really caught my eye was this tiny piece of fossilized bone. I know that vertebrate material can be found in the Grayson - I've even found some nice Cretolamna and Ptychodus teeth myself - but this doesn't seem to be fish or shark. The walls of the inner cavity are extremely thin when you look at the cross section where it is broken which is what's leading me in the pterosaur direction. Maybe a metatarsal? Or a fragment of a larger bone from a much smaller species? Any help would be appreciated.
  7. Hello all! This is a little photo project I've been working on for a while. When I first started Fossil Hunting I was content to collect whatever. Then I was excited about Identifying what I was finding. The education continued and now I work to identify the geological formations I am collecting in and am able to know what fossils to look for in what areas. The Pocket Texas Geology website is invaluable for finding out the formation of a specific area (while not 100 percent accurate, it's pretty good). So I wanted to create a post that would help with Central Texas Cretaceous Fossil Identification and this Species by Formation post. There are a couple of great websites for North Texas Fossil ID, but none (that I am aware of) for specifically Central Texas. I am considering Central Texas to be the counties of Hays, Travis, Comal, Blanco, Bexar, Kendell, Williamson, Hill, Burnet, Llano, Bell, Coryell, McLennon and Bosque. And bear in mind, this is not a comprehensive list of all species found in these formations...still working on THAT! But this is what I have found and ID'd so far. I believe it contains MOST of the more commonly found fossils, plus some uncommon fossils. If you see a mis-identification, please let me know! Also, there are more formations than I am presenting, but these have been the most accessible to me. I will list them by ascending order of time period. My time periods are approximate. (Be aware, I am not a geologist nor paleontologist, just an avid amateur, so take it for what it's worth! ) Cretaceous Formations: Glen Rose, Walnut, Comanche Peak, Edwards , Georgetown, Buda, and Austin Chalk. Glen Rose Formation 106-110 MYA (Upper and Lower Glen Rose combined here) ECHINOIDS Row 1. Row 2. Row 3. Row 4. Row 5. Row 6. 1. Hyposalenia phillipsae Echinothurid plates Plagiochasma texanum 2, Goniopygus sp. Pygopyrina hancockensis Paraorthopsis comalensis 3. Loriolia rosana Goniopygus whitneyi Pseudodiadema aguilerai 4. Polydiadema travisensis Leptosalenia texana Hetearaster texanus 5. Coenholectypus sp. Pliotoxaster comanchei Phymosoma texana 6. Cidarid sp. Heteraster obliquetus Paracidarid texanus ECHINODERMATA ETC. 1. 2. 1. Unknown Crinoid Isocrinus annulatus Echinoderm Madreporite 2. Balanocidarid Spine Echinoid Spine Balanocidarid Spine AMMONITES 1. . Engonoceras piedernales Hypacanthoplites mayfieldensis DECAPODS 1. 2. 1. Crab Claw Unknown Crab Claw Unknown Pagurus banderiensis 2. Pagurus banderiensis Pagurus banderiensis Pagurus banderiensis ETCETERA 1. 2. 3. 1. Porocystis globularis Fish Pycnodont Teeth Turtle Bone Fragment 2. Foramnifera Orbitolina (group) Foramnifera Orbitolina (single) Coral Heliopora labyrinthicum 3. Spirobus Worm Annelid Worm GASTROPODS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5, 6. 7. 1. Neritina sp Semineritina apparata Pleutomaria glenrosensis 2. Natica texana Nerinia texana Nerinia harrisi 3. Fusus haysensis Turbo cuyleri Anchura monolifera 4. Cerithium blancoesnsis Unknown Gastropod Unknown Gastropod 5. Nerinia incisa Pseudomelania pupoides Tylostoma traviensis 6. Natica traski Cerithium bullardi Nerinia aquilina 7.. Tylostoma turmidum Purpuroides harperi Lunatia praegrandis BIVALVES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9 10. Other Bivalves : 11. 12. 13 . BIVALVES 1. Lima wacoensis Arca texana Ludbrookia arivechensis 2. Trigonia whitneyi Exogyra paupercula Plicatula parkerae 3. Brachidontes pedernalis Chlamys santoni Granocardium pseudopendens 4. Neithia occidentalis Cardium congestum Arctica comalensis 5. Pinna comancheana Granicardium pendens Fimbria hamiltonae 6. Trigonia gordoni Homomya comalensis Laternula simodsi 7. Psilomya walker Trigonia wendleri Homomya knowltoni 8. Tapes decepta Panopea henselli Arctica texana 9. Psilomya banderiensis Protocardia texana Arca medialis 10. Cyprimeria texana Idonearca terminalis Arctica roemeri 11. Lopha comalensis Ceratosterean texanum Exogyra guadalupae 12. Peilinia crenulimargo Liostrea ragsdalei 13. RUDISTS: Monopleura sp. Toucasia sp. Kimbleia capacis
  8. Fossilized Snails?

    This is my very first post on The Fossil Forum. I was hoping for some experts to weigh in on what exactly are these fossils. I picked them from a lake shore in Central Texas. Can you please tell me the species? What are the approximate ages for these? Why did they go extinct? Thank you for all of your help. Dubs
  9. Central Texas fossil hunt

    I took a advantage of the cool weather today (low 90's) and headed out to Central Texas near Waco. This was first time hunting in the Texas Paw Paw formation ( The Paw Paw Formation is a geological formation in Texas whose strata date back to the late Albian stage of the Early Cretaceous. Dinosaur remains are among the fossils that have been recovered from the formation). I didn't find any dinosaurs , but found plenty of ammos on the cliff and in the creek bed. It was an interesting experience finding few ammonites. Here are few photos that I snapped today. Beautiful day lower 90's. Creek water level is always low this time of the year. I found this complete ammo sticking out of the cliff. Typical Paw Paw formation. Got my trusty old tools out and hammering out the ammo. Other Ammos are in the creek bed, but badly worn. Got one out!
  10. Please share some wisdom

    Hello everyone. I am new to the site so please let me slide if this is incomplete. I found this fossil in a small Creek in the west part of Dallas county in Texas. This area is upper Cretaceous but this bone is in amazing condition in my opinion so maybe more recent?? It is currently in storage so these are the only pictures I have right now. Any info or suggestions would be awesome and appreciated
  11. Central Texas Flint rock

    From the album Central Texas Flint Rock

    Found these rocks over the weekend. Excellent spark material.
  12. Found this in Comanche Peak limestone formation in Central Texas. I'm thinking Eoradiolites quadratus but not sure if there's enough info to nail down species. Apex to apex measures approximately 1.5 cm for three different samples. I will slowly post more pics of the other specimens, as I reduce photo sizes without losing quality. Thanks for your help.
  13. My daughter and I are looking for new fossil-finding adventures in central and Northeast Texas. We have already been numerous times to Ladonia, Sherman and Mineral Wells. We also like to hunt for arrowheads!
  14. Hey folks, If you are here in Central Texas today, the Texas Memorial Museum is having their annual Identification Day. 1-5 PM at the museum on the University of Texas campus, here in Austin. https://tmm.utexas.edu/events/3 I will be there along with some other members of the Paleontological Society of Austin to assist in identifying your fossils. We will be handling the invertebrates but there will be others helping with vertebrates, both fossil and extant, rocks and minerals, as well as artifacts and other natural items you might be curious about. TMM's Identification Day is part of the Austin Museum Partnership's annual Austin Museum Day, a FREE community-wide exploration of museums in and around Austin.
  15. A Cross-section of Something, Perhaps?

    This peculiar thing caught my eye while I was out looking for urchins, clams, gastropods and all of the other bountiful fossil blessings of Central Texas. This was in an intermittent creek cut in the Comanche Peak formation, Lower Cretaceous period, western Bell County, Texas. The scale in the background is inches (sorry, no metric device readily available). The oval shape of the fossil is 1.5 cm by 1 cm. All of the lines you see making up the fossil are crystalized sediment within the limestone matrix. My 8 year old was excited about how "sparkly" it looked under the flashlight. In a couple of the pictures you can see what appears to be a very small section of the side of the fossil. I am stumped on this one. My hunch is that i'm seeing the inside of an organism that we typically get to see the outside of. But i don't know what the insides of the urchins look like. Seems too oval to be a cross section of phymosoma texanum. Maybe it was a plant or coral? Could it be a flattened-out, crystalized Parasmilia?
  16. In the continuing saga of finding all the echinoids of Texas.....I found a few new things plus re-assessing my collection I found I already had another example (albeit small bits only) of another! So here are my latest finds (and re-finds). In my collection from Marathon Tx was a couple of bits of (I think) an Archeocidarid!! Stopped by a little creek in Austin and found this lovely Coenholectypus: Went on a little road trip to Glen Rose TX and found what I thought was a Loriolia but on closer inspection, it's a Goniopygus! Not a great specimen, but slightly better than my previous ones, so still looking for a nice one: And the piece de resistance : A Balanocidarid Spine!! Practically in my own backyard (well, within 30 minutes drive anyways)
  17. Hello all!! Was in Bell County and found this little bit - Fredericksburg Group Cretaceous. It seems to have an interesting structure. Apparently some "fishy bits' have been found in the area...is that what I have? Thanks!
  18. Fossil Fest

    Hey all you local Central Texas folk. It's time for Fossil Fest. This is the annual show of the Paleontological Society of Austin. Next weekend, November 3 & 4, Round Rock, Texas. Family friendly, lots of stuff to see including displays by our members, including me, hourly door prizes, grand door prizes and a nice variety of dealers. Follow this link for details: https://austinpaleo.org/fest.html Hope to see you there. Erich Rose President, PSA
  19. I own some property in Blanco County, Texas and there are many fossils and fossil imprints embedded in the rock along the creek that runs through the property. I would love to know what these fossils are. I am posting just 2 pics because of size restrictions. I know nothing about fossils but am fascinated by the ones I have found. Any help would be appreciated.
  20. We found this working outside of Horseshoe Bay Texas. Can anybody identify it? thanks
  21. Central Texas Fossil ID

    Not a particularly exciting ID request, but these have been driving me crazy. I pick up tiny fragments of these in the North Sulphur River and Post Oak Creek, and picked up some bigger chunks while hunting in central Texas lately. On the "exterior" the striations run vertical, but on the cross sections the striations are horizontal. On larger chunks there are sometimes a layer of pocketed material on the back. Is it petrified wood, shell fragments, some type of enamel? I keep grabbing these things without knowing for sure what they are, and I'm ready to toss them if I can't figure it out. http://imgur.com/a/qwKtl Any help is appreciated. Thanks y'all!
  22. Hill Country Fossil Club

    Hi ya'll! Just a little reminder that we have a small group of avid (amateur) collectors who get together for meetings and hunts. We usually meet in New Braunfels and do our hunts fairly locally (San Antonio, Austin, Canyon Lake, San Marcos). We'd love for you to join us! Much of our ommunication is done via the facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1467355426848631/or feel free to email me at jamielynn@gmx.com. Come fossil hunting with us!!
  23. Hill Country Fossil Club - Texas

    Hello there, my name is Cameron and i'm starting this topic to have an open page for the flow of ideas and information about the possible formation of a Hill Country Fossil Club for San Antonio, Austin, and the surrounding areas . This idea has been proposed before on the forums, but it didn't work out, so i'm doing my best to pull everyone together to form some sort of club. It could be anything from an organized monthly meetup for group fossil hunting trips, guest speakers, etc. to a simple email list for members to invite a couple tag-alongs on their upcoming trips. However it takes shape, it'd be beneficial to alot of the central Texas members of the forum to form a local fossil community. So far, my idea is to maintain the facebook page created last time (for those who prefer facebook) and make an email and phone number list so each club member gets a reminder when someone plans an open-invite fossil hunting trip, or if there is a meeting coming up, or anything else of that nature. If interested in making a list, pm me your email and texting phone number with whatever name you like to be called. If alot of people prefer to meet first, thats fine too. Maybe we can make a field trip out of it. Just reply with your thoughts and let's all start exchanging ideas. If it doesnt work long-term again at least we have a few new locals to hunt with, lol.
  24. I got in a nice sunset hunt last night. Heavy rain has washed a little of my hilltop spot away and I found some good stuff... A beautiful scallorn point, some 19th century glass, some shells, and a few unidentified things that caught my eye. They all either just looked out of place or appeared to have some form. Some might just be weathered rock. These were all found in Burnet County, Texas on the Eastern Edwards Plateau. I found a snapped stalactite base in this same formation so there might have been a cavern at some point at this spot. Thanks for looking.
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