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Found 141 results

  1. Mazon Concretion

    Hey all! Just bought this piece at a rock shop here in Chicago. It was sold to me as a shrimp, the shop owner was pretty confident in this, but I'm pretty sure it's a fern instead. Not disappointed since I just appreciate the composition here, it's a super pretty one, kind of off-beat. Can anybody help ID the exact fauna? Thanks so much!
  2. Concretion Fossil ID

    I found this over the weekend. I’m trying to figure out if it’s a fish vertebrae or something else. It appears to be coming through on the other side as well (3rd picture). I’ve included some pics of other fossils in the same rock. I’m sorry for size reference. I don’t have anything in millimeter lengths laying around. Thank you all.
  3. Insect ID request

    Can anyone tell me which insect this is? It's Jurassic, Charmouth, Dorset, England. 1.5"
  4. Fossils, or...?

    I tough these two "things" were coprolites (cut and polished), but after taking a look at past discussions here I'm no longer sure. On other other hand, I don't know of minerals that would grow on a spiral. What do you think? Diameter is about 10cm and 5cm, respectively. No idea about provenance - both bought at flea markets in Germany. Thanks in advance
  5. egg or strange rock

    i prefer to play in the dirt to find fossils but i couldn't pass this up at an estate sale. price was right so i brought it home to study. not sure where it came from. any info would be much appreciated. thanks
  6. Managed to stop in for a little Mazon Creek style Easter egg hunt when I was up in Chicago last June. Brought back maybe a gallon or so of concretions and I've been cycling them in my freezer (when I remember). I like to give them a bit of a (gentle) tap around the edges from time to time. This often helps the concretion to shed an outer layer or to coax a split that is nearly there and just begging to pop. As expected, I've had a number (the majority) of concretions open up to reveal a complete lack of anything at all within. The only thing that revealed itself to be of interest was this little concretion that measures 3.5 x 4.0 cm. I pulled out my copy of The Mazon Creek Fossil Fauna book and you think with that information at my fingertips that I'd be able to make a coherent guess as to the identity of this fossil but I am at a loss to match it up convincingly to any of the taxa described there. Hoping some of the members here with more experience can chime in. @Nimravis @RCFossils @stats @Mark Kmiecik
  7. I found a drainage ravine with thousands of these these in them. I'm almost certain they're an iron concretion of some type but I've gotten several different identifications. I took a few of them to the MAPS expo last spring for an ID. One person said michelinoceras, but then an expert on cephalopods said no, definitely not, but he had also never seen anything like them. These were found on the north side of Dubuque, IA right at the top of the lower Galena dolomite just above the upper chert beds. They are in a thick sticky grey clay which sits just above a thick iron rich encrusted layer that varies from 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick (blackend hardground?). The clay layer is approximately 20' thick and contains thousands of these. They are almost all vertically oriented, cylindrical in shape, and vary from 1/2 inch to as much as 6 inches in diameter, and vary in length from several inches to several feet long. Some of the smaller ones that have weathered out do look amazingly like cephalopods. I had previously found a few pinky finger sized weathered ones farther down the ravine and thought cephalopod but then found the clay with the bigger ones. They have a center that resembles a siphuncle but I don't see anything that looks like septa or individual chambers. There are too many of these to think they haven't been found before but I can't seem to find anything describes them specifically for this area. I did find a paper from a study done in Finland titled "Ferruginous Concretions Around Root Channels and Fine Sand Deposits". That paper seems to describe what these may be be but since I've gotten a couple different ID's and none of them concretion I was hoping someone with a little more knowledge can tell me for sure. url to the research paper - https://doi.org/10.17741/bgsf/47.1-2.020
  8. Strange colour crab claw

    A couple of hours in on our fossil hunt at Glen Afric, I spotted another crab fossil! This had now been our 3rd crab of the day. We have not found a similar crab to this one. Any ideas or thoughts on why the colour is so strange?
  9. Glen Afric New Zealand fossil

    A few weeks ago, we stumbled upon a concretion along the shore at Glen Afric. These are the photos. If anyone can ID them, it would be much appreciated. (length is given in cm) (The weight is 4kg) Top Height Bottom
  10. "I've Got the Snitch" Fossil hunter finds 185-million-year-old ‘golden snitch’ with ancient sea creature inside Charlotte Edwards, Digital Technology and Science Reporter, Nov. 18, 2019, https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/10369483/golden-snitch-fossil-yorkshire/ Yours, Paul H.
  11. Hello, I’ve noticed something odd with some of my mazon creek fossils that I haven’t looked at in a long time. Some of them seem to have small spots developing on them that I could swear weren’t there, say, 10 years ago. Anyone have any idea what these little circles are? There are 4 on the left Tully monster right above the white paint. And 1 on the right Tully just off the lower left edge of the body. And the white paint is a whole different issue... Open to any suggestions on how to remove that too... was thinking about rubbing alcohol. And then here is a shark egg case that seems to have a LOT of the little spots/circles. Thanks for any insight.
  12. I’ve been in New Zealand for over a month and spent a lot of time on the coast famous for the big Tumidocarcinus crab concretions. Unfortunately my trip was mainly to visit my father who was ill and he passed away while I was here. Time on the beach has been a good distraction and helps to start the healing process. You might be surprised that I usually have the beach to myself and the solitude and sounds, sites and smells of the coast are a comfort. In terms of fossils it was my best trip yet, but this came from lots and lots of walking, boulder hopping, and early starts. Sorry pictures are large files since I’m doing this from my phone. So spread out in many posts. Day 1, was exploring new sections of coast, clambering over rocks the size of a bus with razor sharp shells. Found some nice concretions, but they were empty
  13. Ive been working on a most wonderful crab concretion these last few weeks and finally got to the grinding stage to smooth out the tool marks. While grinding at times I would realize a bad smell? About the 3rd or 4th time I smelled this smell I began to wonder what was going on? and no, I wasn't passing gas, (just to stop any of you funny business type fellows). My guess is sulpher? I noticed when i was prepping this crab that its got a bit of pyrite in it so the rock must too? Right? Has anyone ever experienced this? Can grinding on a rock with sulpher in it produce a bad smell? Its not a big deal but just wondering. RB
  14. Hi Everyone I have two halves to a concretion that contains a good size crab. What would be the best way / product to get it restored and ready for prepping? If there is already a thread, please point me in the direction as I couldn't find it. Thanks! @RJB@DLB
  15. Jellyfish? Folded Annularia?

    I found this concretion already opened and heavily coated with dirt and minerals. The few parts I could see poking through gave me hope something was preserved. Now that I have cleaned it up, I am still trying to figure out whether or not the concretion contains a fossil. It can look very different depending on the way you position it. I see a jellyfish looking mantle but the tentacles look different from what I have seen before. Positioned vertically, I start to lose the jellyfish and wonder if it is a partial annularia. Or maybe it is just a lumpily split concretion.
  16. Shrimp?

    I’m not sure what I’m looking at is it a fossil? Is it a Deteriorated fossil. If it is a fossil, how should I proceed? Posting other pics in comments.
  17. So... The story behind this one is that as we were on our way to Travemûnde, we stopped by this beach/cliff, about 20km north of said town. I think that area is called Brodtener Steilufer. I saw this little concretion and decided to whack that on to another rock, and this little thing popped from there. No single idea what it could be. It is quite fragile (I accidentally brushed almost all material in other half away...). And as it can be seen, small one too. No idea of the age or any other metadata. BUT according to one site, near by is sites where Cretaceous, Silurian and Ordovician material can be found.
  18. Hello everyone, I have noticed that I have almost no fossils from the Carboniferous period and would really love to add some to my collection. I have decided to start out with the Mazon creek as it had many fascinating inhabitants. I am interested in pretty much everything from there and am not looking for anything spectacular. For what I have, there are Thalassina anomala mud lobsters from Australia, Devonian fossils from New York such as trilos and brachiopods, Jurassic Ostracods from CT, a few echinoids and probably other things too.
  19. Cretaceous Brazil fish id

    Hi Everyone! I need help identifying a fish concretion from the Cretaceous of Brazil. I think it's a species of Rhacolepis but I don't know for certain. The thing is, I was given this by an elderly friend of my dad's over 10 years ago after this fellow heard I like fossils. He told me he got this at a flea market several decades ago and that it was from the Brazilian Cretaceous but he didn't remember what species it was. Then he moved away and passed a couple months later. Definitely one of the stranger ways I've acquired a specimen, but it's the best fish I have (it came with both halves and is pretty three dimensional) and I'd love to know what exactly it is. Hopefully the pictures are decent.
  20. Unknown Fossil, Images 1 - 3

    I am a new member and total fossil neophyte and am hoping that someone can help ID what I found while at the Mexican/CA border . Location: San Diego County, CA Site Description: At the side of a graded dirt road. Size: approx. 12cm Comments: This first looked like a concretion of some type but there are configurations that could indicate fossils? 1) The first is the embedded oval shape (Is this just a "rock" within the concretion?) [Images 1 - 3] 2) The second configuration appears to be a vertebrae? [Images 4 - 6 appear in 2nd post] I look forward to your comments
  21. Cool pair of claws

    Finally finished up this pair of claws I believe belong to some species of Raninidae, though I'm far from certain. The concretion does contain at least some of the carapace, but it's in pretty bad shape. It seems to be badly crushed and poorly preserved. So I decided to leave that part alone for now and just prep out the claws, which were just starting to weather out of the front of the conc. Some day I hope to find a more complete specimen, but for now I'm pretty happy with this cool pair of claws.
  22. My brother found this while hiking I believe around Mammoth Lakes, California. Its almost perfectly round and feels somewhat light so it may be hollow. Google says its a concretion. My mom thinks its a Geode. What do you think?
  23. Crab prep finished(for now)

    I recently finished this pulalius vulgaris and wanted to show it off. I may work on it more in the future when I get an air abrasive set up, but for now I'm pretty happy with it. It turned out well considering when I dug it out of the bank it rolled down the hill in two pieces. It was my first major repair and I have only prepped 7 or 8 of these. I think the practice is starting to pay off, but having a cooperative crab goes a long way. I know it's nowhere near the level of skill you see elsewhere on the forum, but I'm pretty dang proud of this one.
  24. I took my 8 year old on a concretion hunting expedition to the Lincoln Creek formation over the weekend, and we didn't find anything too great, mostly they contained this reddish brown crystalline mineral in various unidentifiable shapes. My son says he thinks this one is a fish, and I told him I didn't see it, but he said I should "ask the internet" because I "don't know everything," so I'm asking away! Any thoughts on what the mineral is that's inside these? It doesn't appear to be iron-based since it weathers pale, not rusty, as shown by the second photo. I forgot to include something for scale, but the rectangular faces of the broken concretion (left side of photo) measure about 5cm x 4cm.
  25. I've been busy whacking concretions today (ok not so much whacking as gently knocking around and around until they give way), and this is the first one where it contained something that I suspect can be identified. Anyone know what bivalve this is? It's from the middle of the formation, so I think that means Lower Zemorrian? At least that's what it was called in the 1960s when the relevant report was published, I dunno if it's been standardized to some other designation since then. The shell measures 3cm across.
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