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Found 1,825 results

  1. Trilobite?

    Hi I just found this while fossil hunting Saturday and am wondering if it could be a piece of a Trilobite? And if it’s to hard to tell is there anyway I can prep it without breaking it to reveal what it is? Thank you!
  2. Does anyone have tips for visiting Lost River, WV? I looked at fossil guy's website for tips and decided I wanted more. Is it still accessible? I heard that there were some exposures along the way. Are there any worth my time?
  3. Devonian trip

    The other day I went on a annual trip to a quarry in Iowa. Givetian age rocks. Finds were few this time around, for me at least. This was my best find, although not perfect or complete, still a nice example. It was tricky to prep as I didn't want to destroy the reddish- mauve brachiopod contrasting nicely with the caramel colored E. noorwoodensis. Thanks for looking!
  4. Yesterday, Tim (Fossildude19) and myself met at our usual meeting spot and with Tim driving and his downloads playing, we headed north to a planned rendezvous with the New York Paleontological Society's outing at Cobleskill Stone Products just outside Schoharie, N.Y. The weather was gorgeous- perfect really, sunny mid-50s. Fall colors were in full swing. We drove through the northern edge of the Catskills, arriving early at our rendezvous, the parking lot at the Cobleskill Stone Company. It was my first time there since 2013. I went on two previous NY Paleontological Society outings to this site, access tightly restricted. I had wanted to return, but every year there always seemed to be a conflict. One year I recall there was a planned Fossil Forum gathering at DSR on the same day. There were many reasons I wanted to return: The quarry had the best exposure of the Kalkberg Formation I've ever encountered. The Kalkberg is Lower Devonian, part of the Helderberg Group. Marine fossils are especially abundant and well preserved. The biodiversity is exceptional. There are many species of brachiopods, plus corals, nautiloids, bryozoans, the sponge, Hindia, and trilobites. Since the quarry is infrequently hunted, many specimens can be found exposed, even weathered clean right out of the limestone. Many of my best Kalkberg fossils are from there. I was excited to be there. It is always a pleasure to be out collecting with Tim. It was his first time at this quarry. Here are a couple pictures of the quarry. Notice the bright fall colors in the background.
  5. Fenestrate bryozoan prep

    Hello all! I found this pretty cool bryozoan back in July and I decided to give it a prep. Its really easy matrix to work with so its good practice for someone like me who’s only done a handful of preps. Like my past preparations, this will all be done manually using mainly safety pins. Fenestella sp. ? Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Moscow Formation Windom Shale DSR, Lebanon, NY Enjoy!
  6. Here are some finds from a late August to early September long loop road trip, fossil hunting through Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana and Kentucky. I'll appreciate detailed specimen identification help. First photo shows brachiopods & a trilobite from the Devonian Silica Shale Formation near Sylvania, northwestern Ohio.
  7. Possible Trilobite?

    While hiking some park trails yesterday we came across a limestone embankment that was significantly eroded. Lots of Bracciopods, but we found one different one. Located in Saugerties, NY. Is this a part of a trilobite?
  8. These are so-called Petoskey Stones, as I found them along Lake Michigan shoreline. These Devonian age Hexagonaria coral pieces should polish finely.
  9. I found a variety of brachiopods in the Devonian Silica Shale Formation near Sylvania, Ohio, in mid-August. A few are a bit pyritized.
  10. Via Sci-News: Osteostraci, the jawless sister group to all jawed vertebrates, had adaptations for passive control of water flow around the body, according to new research led by the University of Bristol. http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/ecologically-diversified-osteostraci-08916.html Full original paper-no paywall: Computational Fluid Dynamics Suggests Ecological Diversification among Stem-Gnathostomes https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(20)31362-2 Generalized translation: Armored fish developed streamlining and passivecontrol surfaces adapted for efficiency while swimming, as in form over function. Also the big armored heads likely did not have much impact on the later development of jaws and related structures. Or, even simpler, these guys were really efficient at moving through the water even with big, heavy heads and the more modern mouth that evolved later did not necessarily result in greater numbers of different shapes among species.
  11. ID Moroccan Trilobite

    Good evening! My name is Max, i'm writing from Italy and i'm new (just did my presentation) This is my first topic... I want kindly ask you if it is possible to make an identification of the following trilobite. I tried to make the best photos i can with my cellphone (unfortunately i don't have any other cameras ). I give you also the information that i have on this trilobite...but i doubt about the taxonomy... Phacops rana africana Jbel Zguilma (Foum Zguid), near Alnif, Morocco Emsian, Devonian Lenght: 6.0 cm Wide: from 2.5 cm to 3.4 cm I want to say already thanks to all of you! Enjoy your weekend!
  12. NE Iowa Paleozoic

    I read a lot of fossil hunting reports on here, but I don’t post many. I think it’s primarily because it is usually many, many months after I have gone when I finally get everything cleaned up, ID’d and take photos, etc. It just seems too after the fact to me at that point, haha. But this time, due to a wonderful “tour guide” we had, I wanted to get something posted in a relatively timely fashion. Because of that, I haven’t had time to do a lot of research I need to do on specific ID’s but luckily I’m somewhat familiar with most of what we found to make at least an educated guess. I have seen numerous folks on here show some of their finds from the Ordovician and Devonian of Iowa and nearby states and it always looked intriguing to me as I have collected the Ordovician in the (relatively) nearby Cincinnati area and the Devonian in the Great Lakes area and Oklahoma. I wanted to see how the Iowa stuff compares. So my wife and I opted to take the long way home from Indiana to Texas and swing through Iowa (and on to South Dakota, but that was more for sight-seeing). I had done some research on sites to check out and contacted Mike @minnbuckeye to see if he could help me high grade my list. Being the absolute gentleman that he is, he did one better and offered to act as our tour guide for a day of collecting through the Ordovician! What a guy!! I can’t thank him enough for taking the time to do this. We had a great day and hit a bunch of nice spots, most of which I had not found on my own and certainly didn’t know some of the very important details of the sites. Many folks have said it in other trip reports and I can only add to the chorus of how valuable it is to go with someone that knows the area and how nice it is of TFF members such as @minnbuckeye to offer their time and energy to do it. Based on Mike’s recommendation, we spent our first day doing some collecting in the Devonian rocks of the Coralville, Iowa area. The first spot we could not access due to some current road construction but we made our way to the next one and spent several hours along the Iowa River/Coralville Lake collecting from the Coralville Formation of the Cedar Valley Group. You quickly learn how Coralville got its name as the rocks are a coral/bryozoan limestone. There are brachiopods and other fauna, but corals make up the bulk of the fossils at this site. And there were some very nice ones as you can see in the pictures below. Beautiful Hexagonaria, huge horn corals and others. We also went to the Devonian Fossil Gorge and a nearby state park, both of which have nice exposures of Devonian rocks with fossils, but no collecting. Here is a shot of the area, fossils litter the ground. This represents our total haul from this site The horn coral in here were abundant and quite large. Corals What I believe are Hexagoanaria corals. I think with a little cleaning, these will look really nice and I like the juxtaposition with the horn coral. Brachiopods and bryozoans A nice piece that was a little too big to take.
  13. A bunch of fossils from Eifel

    Hello everyone! A bit ago traded some fossils with @Max-fossils and received some really cool stuff. I have only now gotten around to photographing them and would like to ask for your help with getting accurate IDs. These are all from the Givetian/ Eifelian of Eifel, Germany. I would appreciate any help with these IDs First some corals: 1. This piece was labelled as Favosites sp.
  14. Indiana Brachiopod ID

    Here's a sweet Brachiopod I found yesterday, it's quite interesting and I've only found one other like it, I am unfamiliar with the specific species but I am very interested if anyone could tell me more about it!
  15. Last week started normally, and ended with me driving from NYC to the Finger Lakes, the chauffeur for my fiance and her maid of honor for a half-week getaway (after 6 months of lockdown). With no plans of my own, I read a little about the area and saw mention of trilobites being found. My dad has a trilobite on the mantle when I was growing up, so I read further and saw many were found in a stream bed near where we were staying, and all of a sudden I was making plans to go fossil hunting. Luckily I found this forum and other resources in my quick search and learned the stream in question is on private property. I identified a number of public that looked similar/nearby on google maps terrain, and decided to look there. I made a few outings myself while they did their thing, and we all made a few stops along our drive and looked together a couple times. It was my first time, and it started slow. At one road stop my fiance found what might have been coral? Then I found a worm-looking thing at a roadside waterfall, but it cracked when i picked it up again. It was when I/we went to Clark Gully and Bare Hill Unique Area near Lake Canandaigua, and Kashong Creek near Lake Seneca that we really found some neat things (which I'll start posting below). I know very little about fossils but have ordered a book and started reading through this forum and other resources to learn more about what I found. I know the area is known for Devonian fossils, so I'm working from the assumption that these are from around then. In the meantime, I've given them all a gentle cleaning; I tried scrubbing gently with both dish soap and vinegar, the former seems to work better, but I'm trying to be as careful as possible to not damage anything until I know what I am doing. These first three fossils we found at Kashong in the stream bed. We found lots of amalgamations of shell imprints/other things, but these 3 really stood out. The first one you can really see the difference from before and after cleaning, in terms of the detail. Im afraid to do much more, and am open to any suggestions as I post some more! (Before cleaning) (After cleaning) Front view, before cleaning (Before cleaning) (After very, very gentle cleaning) (After cleaning) Thanks to this forum for helping me quickly brush up on the basics and find these guys, it was really fun!
  16. Hi, my daughter is fossil obsessed and we are heading out to regional NSW for a trip and would love to do some fossil fossicking along the way. We are going to Canowindra, Parkes, Bourke, Broken Hill, and Griffith. If you have any suggestions as to places we could fossick that would be wonderful! thanks
  17. Paulding Gastropod

    I found this very compressed gastropod over the summer at the dump piles in Paulding, OH (Silica Shale, Devonian). I don't recognize it. Any thoughts? @Peat Burns @minnbuckeye
  18. Seed or something else?

    Hi, was on a road trip a few weeks ago for work and stopped at a spot where rocks had been excavated along the road. These rocks where full of partial leaf imprints and stems, alongside Trilobites and bivalves. The first pic is of a few partials I found, second pic has the fossil in question and a stem or leaf of sorts. I am not sure of the age as I'm still trying to piece together how there are leaves with the devonian fossilsI'm guessing that the the rocks are from different layers, the fauna bieng middle to late devonian while the Flora is permian in age. Anyway, will not be getting a chance to go out there anytime soon again. What do you think the spherical fossil could be? Thanks
  19. Hi everyone! Today I went on another fossil hunting trip with the fossil club the BVP. https://www.paleontica.org/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=3&language=en We visited the "La Couvinoise" quarry in Couvin, Belgium. The rocks in this quarry are part of the Hanonet Formation which lies at the boundry of the Eifelian & Givetian. But the layers we searched in today where all Givetian in age (387,7 - 382,7 mya), I mainly searched in the Crinoïd & Brachiopod layer. Although I have to admit that we probably visited the quarry at a bad moment, as the yield was quite poor in the quarry this time according to members who've been there before. Which was quite obvious as I think we only found our first fossil rich rocks after 50 minutes of searching and even then the first hour of finds where few and poor in quality. But after a while of searching I found some good and rich blocks and managed to get some decent Crinoïd stems, Brachiopods and some rugose coral pieces. But the best 3 finds we did during the last 30 minutes of being in the quarry. The 1st one was the only Trilobite I found during the hunt! Trilos are very rare from this quarry and I believe only 1 other member found one before me on this trip. I found a pygidium which is still partially enbedded in rock. At first I wasn't sure whether I was a trilo or a brachiopod but after having a couple of other members checking it out, they all believed it to be trilobite. The excursion leader time was quite amazed by the find as this trilo came from the Crinoïd layer, which is a layer where he believed no trilobite had ever been found. The trilobites are usually found in another part and layer a bit further in the quarry. So yeah I am very pleased with that find! The 2nd best find, was one I didn't find myself but recieved from our Excursion leader Tom, which was a piece of very nice Stromatoporoidea which I wasn't lucky enough to find. The 3rd best find an perhaps my favorite was something that Tom told me to check out. He had discovered the remains of a cave that collapsed during some excavations in the quarry. You could clearly see the remains of dripping stones on the walls and luckily for us, some pieces of those dripping stones where also laying on the ground. So I managed to take a nice piece of them home with me They are encrusted with a layer of dried mud but I am sure they will look gorgeous once they are cleaned! The rings are already clearly visable in some areas. Here are some pictures from inside the quarry. This was the way to the newly excavated plateau which unfortunatly was a complete was of time as not a single fossil could be found in those rocks. After that we went to the other lower parts of the quarry where I mainly worked in a single piece of wall in the Crinoïd layer. I was lucky enough to find a few good fallen blocks and some good places in the wall with some decent Crinoïds and Brachiopods. One of the nice Crinoïds stems I found in the layer. And here is the piece of wall that has some of the dripping stones in it.
  20. Hi everyone! Yesterday my girlfriend & I went on a fossil hunting trip to an abandoned quarry in Resteigne in Belgium. https://www.paleontica.org/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=10&language=en I am currently at home for some time due to mental health issues. I am currently dealing with despression and severe anxiety attacks all related to COVID-19, I am in a risk group and work in an essential store and the stress and way that people threat you finally became too much and I simply snapped. I finally decided to go see a doctor and a psychologist to help out of it all. Since besides going to work I hadn't left the house for the past 6 months and I really needed to get out to help me get rid of the stress and fear, so both the psychologist and doctor encouraged my to go on some fossilhunts as I needed to come out of the house and do some outdoor activities to help with my healing process. So yesterday I went on my first hunt to help me recover! The quarry we visited was an abandoned quarry in Resteigne and the rocks found there are Devonian in age. Most of the fossils found here are from the Eifelian (393.3 - 387.7 mya) and are part of the Jemelle formation. We arrived quite early at the quarry and spent almost 5 and a half hours searching for fossils here. Since we went on a normal week day, we were lucky enough the have the quarry all to our self! Since it was our first time in the quarry we didn't really find anything too spectacular, but I am very happy with the things we found and most important of all, we had a great and fun day! The surrounding environment was stunning and the weather was prefect, sunny but not too hot and not too cold! Ruguse coral in the rocks Only 15 minutes after we arrived we already found our first trilobite! Unfortunatly it was enbedded in a big boulder of very though rock at an impossible angle to remove. We did try to remove it, but when we noticed it would be near impossible and removing it would probably destroy the trilo we eventually decided to leave it. There where multiple other fossils in the same boulder, among them these nice Brachiopods
  21. First Greenops Prep

    I've recently attempted to start preparing the fossils I collected in upstate NY. With a lot of trial and error and some nicked specimens, I have started to get used to my primitive preparation set-up consisting of a nail, a sewing needle and a hammer. Here's a disarticulated greenops which was great practice: On a side note, I've noticed that freshly exposed shell is a nice black. Would anyone know how to get that back?
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