Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Devonian'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Bony Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 980 results

  1. It was only 9 days since my previous (and first) trip to HH, but I was itching to go back and decided to take advantage of the mild weather this Monday. I spent most of the day on the north side of the south pit picking tiny fossils out of the mud. There are an astonishing variety of critters to find if you don't mind lying face down in the dirt. 1. Tiny trilobites! I was not expecting to find any trilobites until I spotted the guy on the left. Luckily I had a small ziplock bag or I would have lost these for sure. They are about 2.5 and 3.0 mm across the head. 2. Nautiloids Fragments like these are most common after brachiopod and crinoid bits 3. Ammonites/goniatites Also very common but one of my favorites, I will never find enough of these. 4. Brachiopods and bivalves Fragments everywhere but a bit harder to find complete 5. Another brach Nothing special, just nicely inflated and good detail on both sides 6. Another brach A little more interesting. I only found one like this. 7. Gastropod I found many fragments that suggest this shape but this one is by far the most compete. 8. Crinoid stem fragments Very abundant but these ones caught my eye 9. Part of a crinoid calyx? (opposite sides of the same piece shown) 10. Cystoid plates Could be wrong, I just learned about cystoids so I'm bound to imagine seeing them everywhere
  2. Devonian Fish

    Head shield, and eyes of cephalaspis, and other dermal bones or plates, spines, of armored Devonian fish. In various stages of development. From the Knoydart Formation, Nova Scotia. This formation is similar to that of the "old red sandstone" of Europe, similar in fossils and mode of preservation. I do not know much yet of Devonian fish fossils, if anyone can comment and let me know more about these that would be great! Thank you. These are my first vertebrate fossils that I have found, last week. I have only ever found invertebrates.
  3. Sycamore Creek Trip

    Went out to an area in NE Oklahoma called Sycamore Creek. This is a creek the leads into Grand Lake at some point. There are lots of fossiliferous rocks I believe that this is a late Devonian and Carboniferous period layer. I am posting a few pics of one fossil that I found. This is a shell and will need to be prepped to see if I can get it to a better display condition. This is the first pic I have posted so trying that feature out.
  4. CORAL COLONY

    Now, i found this when i was seven or eight years old, on the cut down to the beach at Kilve in Somerset, South West England. It was buried in a band of blue/ grey clay in the Psiloceras planorbis zone of the Blue Lias , Lower Jurassic. Although i'd found many lovely fossils before this was my first exceptional, "WOW!" find. I still don't know what it is and that was 45 years ago. A colonial coral colony yes, but i don't think it can be Liassic? A derived fossil from the Devonian or Carboniferous seems likely, but which one? And it shows very little signs of having been transported huge distances, as it's quite a way to the nearest relevant outcrops of those ages. Here it is :
  5. I found this at Hungry Hollow in Arkona, Ontario. Sadly I can't remember which formation I pulled it from but my understanding is they are all Devonian age. It may just be a coral fragment but I've heard fish bones can be found. Any ideas?
  6. So My missus drove me out to Arkona for one last stab at Arkona for 2017. It was cold, but I had to get out and play for one last time. This pic shows the south pit in the morning. A lot was under ice. As I was walking to an already existing bench, this was by my foot. One of many orphaned coral "pies."
  7. I looked at the weather and my schedule and realized that today was really the only good day in a while to get out. It was very foggy until I drove into the valley area and then the sun came out at about 10:45 am when I pulled in. The water was really low and I think they are working on the dam again. Anyway, I walked for a bit splitting rocks and did not find much but plant hash and seafloor hash. I switched sides of the river by jumping on rocks ( the water was really low) and then found this really cool Eospermatopteris branch. I've never seen anything that large before and, no joke, I heard something in the air behind me and saw a Bald Eagle fly over me head right after I found it. Luckily, I was able to chip it out complete and take it home. It was a really nice day and I wandered around splitting rock but not finding anything else of note. I was also being pretty picky and only looking for identifiable new fossils. So there you have it. The first pic is in situ, next one at home in crappy light and lastly the area I was in
  8. For those who have interest in Devonian placoderms here is a paper on Dunkleosteus terrelli Ferrón HG, Martínez-Pérez C, Botella H. (2017) Ecomorphological inferences in early vertebrates: reconstructing Dunkleosteus terrelli (Arthrodira, Placodermi) caudal fin from palaeoecological data. PeerJ 5:e4081https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.4081
  9. Trip to Arkona, Ontario

    I decided to mix things up last weekend and made the 2.5 hour drive from Mississauga over to Arkona, Ontario. The Hungry Hollow formation is quite different from what I am used to closer to home so I went a little crazy...Within 10 minutes I had a bucket full of horn corals, bryozoans and brachiopods. After washing most of the mud away here are some of my favorites. Scale is in millimeters Trilobite fragments 1 2 3 4 Was really hoping for a complete specimen but I am pretty happy with this cephalon pair 5 Brachiopods 6 7 8 Gastropods 9 Chrinoids 10 11 Cephalopod - Probably came from the Arkona shale 12 @Kane you were right, I spent about 5 hours in the south pit and had a great time. Also met a really interesting guy while I was there (I'm horrible with names I think he said it was Rick). He knew the area quite well and was nice enough to donate a few pieces to get me started (#4 trilo fragment on the right and a few cool bryozoans).
  10. huge placoderm

    I often visit the southern part of Belgium for Devonian fossils, the whole area is known for its reef systems. So most of the fossils are brachiopods and corals, but between the reefs sometimes rarer fossils can be found like cephalopods or in extremely rare cases even fish. In more than 25 years of fossil collecting I’ve only found 2 fragments of Devonian fish until last October. During a field trip I searched a few debris next to a quarry and found a strange piece of rock. At first I almost discarded it thinking that it was a strange nodule, surely a piece of this size couldn’t be bone. But I took time to clean of the dirt… I had in my hands a rock with a bone plate, the thing was huge, more than 20 cm on 25 cm, and it was only a fragment. I had never seen something like that from the late Devonian in our area. I started franticly to search the rest of the area, finding more and more fragments. Some parts were even larger and the plates were often more than 1 cm thick, on some places even more than 4 cm. This fish was a monster, I knew this was my find of a lifetime. The rest of the day I spend on the same 2 m² checking every rock. I finally found 14 fragments of the fish. At home I cleaned up all the fragments, I even had a few parts that fitted together, but I couldn’t make anything out of it except that it were large bone fragments. It was also clear that I only got a tiny part of it. In the week to follow I contacted a specialist in placoderms from the Institute in Brussels. Exited by the news he came to check out the fossils at my apartment on a evening. He confirmed that this was indeed a placoderm, and a huge one, even he had never seen one of this size from the late Devonian in Belgium. One of the parts turned out to be a fragment of the median dorsal plate, the typical keel from that part of the fish was clearly visible. One of the drawbacks of the fossil was the complete absence of any ornamentation or tubercles on the bones, this would make the identification difficult. But the size of the specimen limited the options in 3 groups: Either a new extremely large coccosteidea. ( in my opinion the least possible match) Or either a Dynichthydea or a Tytanichthydea. Either way, any of those possibilities are extremely spectacular J Of course on the weekend to follow I had to go back to check out if there was anything I overlooked. Armed with adequate equipment to dig, I started to dig out the spot with my girlfriend. The result was an extra 10 fragments, again with a few of them being very large. And on top of it lots of the new fragments fitted in the ones I found the week before. Since then I’ve been cleaning and prepping a little on the bones and kept contact with the placoderm specialist. Having contemplated what to do with it, I will donate the fossil to the institute next week so that professional work and a proper description of the placoderm can be made. Of course I will post an update of this in the “paleopartners section” I really hope this is a new species, but either way I had fun with this discovery, and there is still much to find out about my “little” fish
  11. Collection (3).jpg

    From the album Collection Showroom

    Permian fossils on the wall Paramblypterus, Acanthodes, Branchiosaurier, below trilobites in 3D from Steinsberg, Quarry Ruppachtal - Devon
  12. Is this a plumalina?

    Can anyone help me here? Found this walking a creek near Ithaca, New York. Hamilton Formation. Ithaca Formation. Is this Plumalina? Thanks! Matt For scale...
  13. Greenops barberi Trilobite Tail a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Greenops barberi Trilobite Tail Moscow Formation in western New York state TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (ca 390,000,000 yrs old) Greenops is a mid-sized Devonian trilobite of the order Phacopida, subfamily Asteropyginae. They are mainly reported from the mid-Devonian Hamilton Group of upstate New York and southwestern Ontario. A similar-looking trilobite from Morocco is often mis-labelled Greenops. Greenops had schizocroidal eyes (resembling compound eyes in insects), large genal spines and short, sharp spines at the tip of each segment of the pygidium ("tail"). Greenops lived in warm, fairly deep water. In the Hamilton Group of New York, they are found with Phacops, Dipleura and Bellacartwrightia, a trilobite that resembles Greenops but has much larger pygidial spines. In Ontario, they are found in the Widder Formation, which outcrops at Arkona, where they are, by far, the dominant trilobite. Greenops' average size is about 1 to 1.5 inches (2.5 to 3.8 cm). They were fairly common trilobites, and are easily identified. While it is rare to find a complete disarticulated body, segments and tails are fairly common. They are fairly common finds in Late Devonian limestones, especially storm deposits. They are identified by their tails, which sport several spines. They were medium to small sized trilobites, which were most likely preyed upon by ammonoids, straight cephalopods, sharks, and small placoderms, hence the defensive spines. All of these animals have been found in close association with this trilobite. Greenops can also be found in deep marine deposits, but there it is fairly rare. Greenops was a small, yet charmingly beautiful trilobite, like its close companion Phacops. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Phacopida Family: †Acastidae Genus: †Greenops Species: †barberi
  14. Greenops barberi Trilobite Tail a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Greenops barberi Trilobite Tail Moscow Formation in western New York state TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (ca 390,000,000 yrs old) Greenops is a mid-sized Devonian trilobite of the order Phacopida, subfamily Asteropyginae. They are mainly reported from the mid-Devonian Hamilton Group of upstate New York and southwestern Ontario. A similar-looking trilobite from Morocco is often mis-labelled Greenops. Greenops had schizocroidal eyes (resembling compound eyes in insects), large genal spines and short, sharp spines at the tip of each segment of the pygidium ("tail"). Greenops lived in warm, fairly deep water. In the Hamilton Group of New York, they are found with Phacops, Dipleura and Bellacartwrightia, a trilobite that resembles Greenops but has much larger pygidial spines. In Ontario, they are found in the Widder Formation, which outcrops at Arkona, where they are, by far, the dominant trilobite. Greenops' average size is about 1 to 1.5 inches (2.5 to 3.8 cm). They were fairly common trilobites, and are easily identified. While it is rare to find a complete disarticulated body, segments and tails are fairly common. They are fairly common finds in Late Devonian limestones, especially storm deposits. They are identified by their tails, which sport several spines. They were medium to small sized trilobites, which were most likely preyed upon by ammonoids, straight cephalopods, sharks, and small placoderms, hence the defensive spines. All of these animals have been found in close association with this trilobite. Greenops can also be found in deep marine deposits, but there it is fairly rare. Greenops was a small, yet charmingly beautiful trilobite, like its close companion Phacops. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Phacopida Family: †Acastidae Genus: †Greenops Species: †barberi
  15. Big Partial Eldredgeops

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Eldredgeops rana (thorax and pygidium) Middle Devonian Upper Ludlowville Formation Hamilton Group Briggs Road Quarry Randolphville, New York This one and 7/8 of an inch long partial specimen is way bigger than any of my other complete or partial specimens of this species. If it had been complete it would have stretch well over two inches.
  16. Conularid from the Marcellus Shale

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Conularia sp. Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Swamp Road quarry Morrisville, New York
  17. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  18. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  19. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  20. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  21. Polished Horn coral 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Polished Horn Coral fossils SITE LOCATION: Western Sahara, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Devonian age (358-416 million years ago) Data: Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  22. Polished Horn coral 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Polished Horn Coral fossils SITE LOCATION: Western Sahara, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Devonian age (358-416 million years ago) Data: Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  23. Fossil Hexagonia Coral.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Hexagonaria Coral Morocco (Probably west Sahara) TIME PERIOD: Devonian age (359-419 Million years ago) This is a large specimen, about 8" across. Hexagonaria is a genus of colonial rugose coral. Fossils are found in rock formations dating to the Devonian period, about 350 million years ago. Specimens of Hexagonaria can be found in most of the rock formations of the Traverse Group in Michigan. Fossils of this genus form Petoskey stones, the state stone of Michigan. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: Stauriida Family: Disphyllidae Genus: Hexagonariinae Species: †hexagonaria
  24. Orthoceras regulare fossil.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orthoceras regulare fossil Atlas Mountains, south Morocco Devonian (400 Million Years ago) Orthoceras ("straight horn") is a genus of extinct nautiloid cephalopod endemic to Middle Ordovician-aged marine limestones of the Baltic States and Sweden. This genus is sometimes called Orthoceratites. Note it is sometimes misspelled as Orthocera, Orthocerus or Orthoceros (Sweet 1964:K222). Orthoceras was formerly thought to have had a worldwide distribution due to the genus' use as a wastebasket taxon for numerous species of conical-shelled nautiloids throughout the Paleozoic and Triassic. Now, Orthoceras sensu stricto refers to O. regulare, of Ordovician-aged Baltic Sea limestones of Sweden and neighboring areas. These are slender, elongate shells with the middle of the body chamber transversely constricted, and a subcentral orthochoanitic siphuncle. The surface is ornamented by a network of fine lirae (Sweet 1964:K224). Many other very similar species are included under the genus Michelinoceras. Orthoceras and related orthoconic nautiloid cephalopods are often confused with the superficially similar Baculites and related Cretaceous orthoconic ammonoids. Both are long and tubular in form, and both are common items for sale in rock shops (often under each other's names). Both lineages evidently evolved the tubular form independently of one another, and at different times in earth history. Orthoceras lived much earlier (Middle Ordovician) than Baculites (Late Cretaceous). The two types of fossils can be distinguished by many features, most obvious among which is the suture line: simple in Orthoceras, intricately foliated in Baculites and related species. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Orthocerida Family: †Orthoceratidae Genus: †Orthoceras Species: †regulare
×