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Found 783 results

  1. A cute T-rex cousin from Utah

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/moros-fills-tyrannosaur-origin-story/583264/ https://www.newsweek.com/new-dinosaur-utah-moros-intrepidus-tyrannosaurus-rex-1338776?piano_t=1
  2. I was hoping somebody on TFF might be able to point me in the direction of any scientific papers, research or information that members here might have put together regarding dromaeosaurid theropods from the Judith River formation. This is not really about identifying any teeth, though I do have one from that formation. I am starting to do my research for the education program and am looking for scientific information. From what I can gather, there is a possible Saurornitholestes species and of course the dinosaur I have seen referred to as Julieraptor, which is a interesting story all on its own. I have also seen Dromaeosaurus listed from that formation. I would like to sort out what is known and unknown from the formation and the best way to present our "raptor" tooth to the kids. Any help links or suggestions as to where I might find more information on this would be much appreciated
  3. Additional sauropod dinosaur material from the Callovian Oxford Clay Formation, Peterborough, UK: evidence for higher sauropod diversity. Who would have believed it, Dinosaur remains from Peterborough UK ! Four isolated sauropod axial elements from the Oxford Clay Formation (Callovian, Middle Jurassic) of Peterborough, UK. “But wait, how can that be” is the response I usually receive “how is that even possible for sauropod and marine reptiles to coincide from the same Oxford Clay Formation deposits of Peterborough” Well, the time and effort that Femke M. Holwerda, Mark Evans and Jeff J. Liston have put into explaining such finds in this write up makes for a much-needed thought provoking read indeed. The full PeerJ article PDF version is at the link below. https://peerj.com/articles/6404/ “Femke, Mark and Jeff thank you for the acknowledgement I really appreciate that”
  4. A claw from Hell Creek

    I bought this claw a little while ago, for close to nothing. Still waiting for the item to arrive. Not sure what it is from though. It was dug up in Hell Creek. The claw and bone measure about an inch in length in total. Anyone who would have a qualified guess?
  5. I found this lovely velociraptorine claw while searching my Wealden bone bed collection. I enjoyed taking these photos, they are some of the most striking images I have taken of a fossil I think.
  6. Had been talking with a guy selling a spinosaurus jaw-piece, and got the pictures of it today. And the first thing that strikes me, is how perfect the teeth look compared to the rest of the jaw. To me, it sorta looks like they were planted there. With that said, there's a tooth in the jaw, that hasn't grown out, which is obviously much harder to make. However it does look like the part on where it sits, has been restored, and thereby the chance of it being placed there. And to me it also looks a bit like there are fillings in-between the two big teeth. I'm very much in doubt about this one, but right now it looks very suspicious to me, so I just wanted to post this here in case some of you guys can confirm that it's fake, composite, or real.
  7. A french theropod tooth

    A guy is selling this tooth, accordingly a theropod from France, found in Cherves-Richemont quarry, Cherves-de-Cognac. It measures 1,5 cm in length. The seller says it is "allosaurid". I've been looking a bit around for some similiar teeth from the area, as well as species, and I find it a bit hard to find some good articles or pictures to cover this, but from what I can make out of it at this point, it may either be Nuthetes, or perhaps a french Neovenator? I had read recently, that they had found teeth in France, resembling the holotype of Neovenator, so that would make sense with the "allosaurid". There's a lot of disagreement about Nuthetes in general as well, from what I've heard. So what would you guys classify this tooth as? To me the shape does not look much like any dromaeosaurid.
  8. A dinosaur egg clutch from Henan. Genuine?
  9. When I first set out to collect Dinosaur fossils, a fossil dealer with a long history in the industry and from whom I had purchased shark fossils from had this listed for sale. It was sold as a Troodon formosus ( I am aware it is an invalid taxon). When I committed to purchasing this, i was unaware that only Troodontid teeth had been found in Hell Creek and I tended to believe dealer ID's. I do not regret the purchase. It is a great little bone to have in our education program and it was not expensive. We want to cover Troodontids in our education program which is why I bought this. It was cheaper than a tooth. It was also a good lesson to learn early on and without a significant financial investment. I do my homework know before purchasing a dinosaur fossil and if I have questions, I put it here. It seems unlikely that that the dealer ID is correct just based on the lack of Troodontid bones that come from Hell Creek. I want to know we have and be accurate in what we present to kids so I have put some effort into figuring this out. It is a very small vertebra as you can see in the pictures. I did find some small theropod caudal vertebrae that look similar including a Troodontid. I have done some homework on this and tried to figure it out but I can not get much further on my own. All I can say for sure is that is does not appear to be a fish or mammal and I do not think it is a crocodilian either. Any thoughts or information would be helpful !!
  10. The race to rescue 95-million-year-old dinosaur footprints from the elements in the Queensland outback. Belinda Smith for The Chase, ABC Science, Australian Broadcasting Corporation https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-14/the-race-to-save-wintons-dinosaur-footprints/10578212 Winton footprint fossils saved from floods By Belinda Smith on AM, Australian Broadcasting Corporation https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/am/winton-footprint-fossils-saved-from-floods/10810194 Related paper is: Romilio, A. and Salisbury, S.W., 2011. A reassessment of large theropod dinosaur tracks from the mid-Cretaceous (late Albian– Cenomanian) Winton Formation of Lark Quarry, central-western Queensland, Australia: a case for mistaken identity. Cretaceous Research, 32(2), pp.135-142. https://dinosaurs.group.uq.edu.au/files/2119/Romilio_Salisbury_2011.pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/222618836_A_reassessment_of_large_theropod_dinosaur_tracks_from_the_mid-Cretaceous_late_Albian-Cenomanian_Winton_Formation_of_Lark_Quarry_central-western_Queensland_Australia_A_case_for_mistaken_identity https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anthony_Romilio Yours, Paul H.
  11. Found a very interesting item online. But because of the price-class of it, and because I think the connecting part of the claw looks strange for a theropod handclaw, I thought I'd post it here. What is your opinions? Is this a "Spinosaurus Hand-Claw"? I think it looks real enough, but I just haven't seen any theropod hand-claw without a broad connective-end like this one.
  12. I have this evening and tomorrow to get up a bit more of the dinosaur collection before it is back to sharks. We have programs starting soon so my focus will be well away from dinos for a few months probably. Prepare to be underwhelmed lol I thought we would be heavy on the Moroccan dinosaurs because they are so abundant. Surprisingly, we are pretty light on African dinosaurs. I found a path to getting us deeper into North American animals. It is a bonus that an area we will need to fill is the most abundant and affordable. The dinosaur program will have a different scientific concept behind than sharks. The best state science standard we can hit for 1st-3rd graders is geology so some of the dinosaur program will focus on the formations in goelogical terms. I am looking forward to learning more about the paleoecology of this region and talking about how we can get clues about the habitats from the rocks. It is an interesting collection of animals to learn about. We have a "raptor" tooth from Kem Kem. You know, one of those "raptors". Is it Deltradromodeus or is it an abelisaur? The question can not be answered so we are presenting it as it is, a Theropd indet from North Africa. No need to go much further. It presents a great opportunity to discuss with the kids how difficult it is to describe dinosaur species. We know it is a Theropd tooth and it was carnivorous. We know there are several different dinosaurs it could be but we can not say for sure. I can not tell if my sauropod tooth is a Rebbachisaurus or not but i know you can ID them. I also know there is another sauropod in Kem Kem. If we were presenting tomorrow, it would be Rebbachisaurus. They are one cool looking dinosaur. With some more education, i will be able to tell. Either way, this tooth is the only sauropod fossil we have so this becomes the first dinosaur we really can really expand on. These teeth are inexpensive and this is the only sauropod we are likely to have fossils for. The long-neck dinosaurs are the biggest land animals ever and kids know them so we will be adding more teeth to bulk up the presentation. I have yet to pick up Spinosaur teeth but they are next on the list. I am still learning about Spinosaur teeth and have been cautious. We want to make sure we get some of the inexpensive teeth for the kids to handle and a nice example for the presentation. Carcharodontosaurus is one we will add but not until I have studied them better. There is a wide range of prices and quality. Pic 1- Theropod indet, Kem Kem. Pic 2- Sauropod indet, Kem Kem.
  13. We had an awesome item show up in our mail box today, an Edmontosaurus jaw fragment. It is the product of our first trade on TFF and it is really the first dinosaur piece we have that is not a tooth. We traded an extra dinosaur tooth for it. A Hell Creek for Hell Creek swap. Thank you @Captcrunch227 for an awesome trade and for being a great trade partner. We are super happy with the process and the end result. The mail brought another pleasant surprise. Our Acheroraptor tooth arrived. It is a beautiful tooth and a great addition. As if our day was not busy enough, we secured ourselves an Ankylosaurus tooth from Judith River and it is not a nodosaur. Right tooth from the right formation. I am not saying it is a tooth from Zuul at all but it gives us a chance to tell the kiddos that it MIGHT be . I think Zuul is the perfect species to discuss armored dinos that a lot of kids will recognize but also I am super fired about it. All and all, a pretty fantastic day off from work for me lol
  14. Having bought fossils for years, I noticed that fossils are photographed or measured in a way that might exaggerate their sizes. Such methods include: 1 - Pinching their fingers or creasing their palms to create a small rise for the fossil 2 - Zooming in specifically on the fossil (Good to show details, but not good for size judging) 3 - Using a small hand, e.g. a child or woman's hand 4 - Giving a "by the curve" measurement instead of the straight line. E.g. a 4-incher tooth is in fact 3-inch if measured on the straight line As an example, here's a juvenile Rex tooth: Looks pretty big eh? Here's the real size: It's a hair under an inch long! I've been at the receiving end of this myself where a tooth I mistakenly assumed to be decently sized turned out to be pathetically small. To sum it up. if purchasing fossil teeth online in the future, ask specifically for the straight line measurement, or better yet ask for a photo next to a ruler. That's the only way to be fully informed about your purchase. Good luck, and happy buying!
  15. The Basic Dinosaur Egg Guide Many people often mistake a concretion for an egg, to help clarify what is a concretion, and what is a real egg, here is a guide. A quick overview with examples: How to spot a concretion: How are they different from eggs? A concretion is a rather common rock made of tightly compressed minerals. Typically, concretions are a smooth sphere or oval with little to no surface texture or just a few bumps. Often nearly a perfect sphere, sometimes more of an oval. In a concretion, there is no eggshell. If you cannot see eggshell then you do not have an egg. If it looks the same shape as modern egg, such as from chicken then you do not have an egg. Concretions may have fragments breaking off and these will tend to be smooth on both sides. They tend to be dull earthy colors with a different composition in the center, as seen by a change in color. A different color in the center normally means you do not have an egg. Often circular bandings can be seen around exterior of concretions. Sizes of concretions range from just an inch, or a few millimeters, up to more than 10 ft (3 m). Egg sizes, along one side, range from just an inch or a few millimeters and top out at around 8 in (20 cm). If you find an oval or round shape, which is larger than 8 in (20 cm) along a side then it is probably not an egg. For more information on concretions: https://www.priweb.org/index.php/education/education-projects-programs/earth-101/concretions http://tumblehomelearning.com/geologists-find-largest-dinosaur-eggs-in-the-world-another-fraudulent-fossil/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concretion In video form: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5IoyLEwkMY Example of concretions, these three were incorrectly given an ID as “dinosaur eggs” however they are clearly not: From Tumblehome Learning, link above Pseudofossils: There are some pseudofossils, which can have a similar appearance to an actual egg, right down to seeming like there are bits of eggshell. This pseudofossil does look similar to an egg and even seems to have eggshell, however it is not an egg and is actually geologic. The surface ranges too much in texture and composition. Pic from Montana State University, taken by P. Germano Trace fossils: Many times, an actual trace fossil can be mistaken for an egg, common examples of this are pupa cases and cocoons. As one can see below, they do tend to have an egg-like shape and are yet another perfect example of why shape alone should not be used when trying to identify eggs. The three below are important trace fossils, just not eggs. Pic by Tony Martin, Ph.D. How to spot a real egg: The best and only true sign you have an actual egg is eggshell actually being present. Eggs come in many shapes from a semi-rounded, elongated oval to a perfect sphere and many others. Shape is not a good indicator of an egg. It is useful but only when combined with other details. Eggshell often has surface ornamentation that gives it a unique texture which can be seen by the naked eye or with a hand lens. There are many such ornamentations and they are used to help distinguish one egg type from another. On the surface look for little bumps, ridges with valleys, river channels, and similar textures. Individual fragments of eggshell are rather common in some geologic formations so be on the lookout for a larger grouping of eggshell. From University of California Museum of Paleontology Also read: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/59654-dinosaur-eggs-lowell-carhart-guide/ Examples of real eggshell: Example of eggshell fragments: An eggshell fragment from Maiasaura, which is the oogenus Spheroolithus oosp. Pic by W. Freimuth. Examples of real eggs: A clutch of Troodon formosus eggs, which are the oospecies Prismatoolithus levis. Pic from Museum of the Rockies Do I have embryos inside this egg? Most likely no. Embryonic remains are extremely rare within eggs, and you add that with the rarity of eggs to start and it is a remote possibility. No fossilized yolks have been found and since they are soft tissue, it is near impossible for any to fossilize. I still think this is an egg! If you still think you have an actual egg, then please start a thread. Take close detailed pictures with something for scale such as a ruler and provide all the information you can about it--like where it was found. Good pictures will help greatly with a proper and correct ID. Below is an example of how to best photograph an egg or eggshell. There is clear lighting, a background which is clearly different than the eggshell in question and a scale bar. Lights can be as simple as a desk lamp; a scale bar can just be a ruler and the background can be very simple, in the example just a paper towel. Megaloolithus egg. Pic from Montana State University, taken by P. Germano If you would like to learn much more on eggs, here is the advanced egg guide which goes in depth. Also, see the advanced guide for sources. Eric P.
  16. Hi, I started this thread because I was kinda surprised that one didn’t exist already at this forum. I myself love replica’s to enhance my collection or to use as educational props when I visit schools, musea use them too so why shouldn’t we. And let’s be honest not all fossils are available for the common fossil collector, not all of us can affort a T-rex skull or a mounted dinosaur skeleton and rare fossils like Archaeopteryx are only to be found in museum collections, so that’s when replica’s come into play. So show us your fossil replica’s, casts and reconstructions in this thread, I am very curious to see what you guys have to show! I will kick this topic off myself with the replica's that I currently have in my collection. A replica of the famous Berlin specimen of Archaeopteryx lithographica, the original was found in the Solnhofen limestone formations of Bavaria in Germany and now resides in the collection of the Natural History Museum of Berlin A cast of a Eophrynus prestvicii, the original was found in the West Midlands in the UK and now resides in the collection of the Museo di Paleontologia in Rome Replica of an Iguanodon thumb spike, the original was found in Cuckfield, Sussex in the UK and now resides in the Natural History Museum of London A replica of a Velociraptor mongoliensis killing claw Eotyrannus lengi claw replica, the original was found on the Isle of Wight in the UK An Allosaurus fragilis thumb claw replica, the original was found in the Morrison formation in Shell, Wyoming in the USA A Baryonyx walkeri claw replica, the original was found on the Isle of Wight in the UK An Australovenator claw reconstruction A Spinosaurus aegyptiacus thumb claw reconstruction Simolestes vorax tooth replica, the original was found during the Victorian era in the Kimmeridgian clay in the UK A Tyrannosaurus rex tooth replica based on the largest T-rex tooth ever found A Juvenile Spinosaurus aegyptiacus skull reconstruction A Grallator footprint replica, the original was found in the south of France A Megalodon tooth cast, the original was found in South Carolina, USA Pterodactylus spectabilis replica, the original was found in the Solnhofen limestone in Germany and now resides in the collection of the Teylers museum in Haarlem in the Netherlands A Plesiosaurus 1/2 scale skull replica
  17. Hello i bought this triceratops tooth a while ago and was just double checking its authenticity. Is it real? Thanks. -Tom
  18. Tucson 2019 Pictures

    So I got back from Tucson a few days ago and thought I'd post some pictures for all to see! Pictures got downloaded out of order when I had to shrink the size to make them compatible for the forum. Sorry I can't ID everything for you guys like @Troodon did last year. Enjoy! Let's start with my favorite topic... eggs! French Eggs: A perfect and complete raptor nest from China: A very rare and complete elephant bird egg from Madagascar: Duck Egg:
  19. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6674939/Toothless-species-dinosaur-lived-100-million-years-ago-discovered-Mongolia.html https://www.cnet.com/news/scientists-discover-fossils-of-new-adorable-baby-dinosaur-in-mongolia/
  20. Hi all It is my birthday today and I thought it would be really nice to celebrate with you all. I am looking forward to having an nice meal with Mrs Rico and maybe a beer or a movie later this evening. Just opened a couple of presents this morning and they are beauties. First up is from me to me, a collection of small Mammoth Bark/Ivory pieces from Siberia and the North Sea. They are definitely an welcome addition to my collector’s draws and now I have about six specimens form different locations. Now from Mrs R an really amazing gift of wonderment that has wowed me . A tiny fragment of skin from a herbivorous Hadrosaur species, from the Low- Upper Cretaceous of Judas River, Montana, USA. With some nice raised ellipsoid scales intact and visible. Even this small piece is stunning. I am really enjoying my birthday scores so far. I do also have a funny feeling I may have a couple of more specimens to post here later this evening when I get to open them . And of course Adam your slice of birthday cake is in the post mate. Cheers everyone.
  21. Need help with identification

    My father, being a fossil collector, passed away a few years ago, which left me with this fossil in possession. I don't know why, but it never occurred to me before now to try and figure out what type of prehistoric fish I've actually got my hands on. Any fossil expert here who could help me out?
  22. Dinosaur Bone and Coprolite ID?

    Hey all. So I just got some of that winter polar vortex stuff and now, there is snow about 2 feet high. I am now indoors and can not go out hunting fossils. So, I went to Michaels to look for fabrics to tie flies for fly fishing. Then I saw a "National Geographic Dig Kit with Genuine Fossils" It was on sale for 5$ and promised 3 real fossils so I just grabbed it and busted it out. After an hour of looking through online, Amazon and many others. I cannot figure out what bone or what coprolite this is. Its driving me crazy not being able to just slap a label on it. Can someone help me figure this out? Bone featured first Coprolite second
  23. Likely some have already seen this, a nice little video on coprolites, what we can learn from them and their significance. Being a post from me, the video of course covers the Two Medicine Formation, I know at least @GeschWhat will enjoy. https://www.facebook.com/scifrimacroscope/videos/986351528231150/
  24. Hell Creek Tooth- Theropod ??

    I started collecting dinosaur fossils fairly recently and so far I have a pretty good working idea of what I have. There is one exception and I thought I would share on the Fossil Forum and see how far I can get with an ID. My guess is that it I will not get much further then unidentified theropod but it could be something completely I suppose. It does not really look like the Acheroraptor tooth I have and it is larger. It does not look like a Tyrannosaurus of any kind to me either. I will work on getting better pictures up though I did get some detailed shots of the serrations on the micro eye at work. This is my first attempt at really assessing a tooth so my language and/or wording may be not be correct. Call it the learning curve lol This is what I know It is from Hell Creek, Powder County Montana Slightly over 1/2 inch long This is what I observed Serrations are larger on one side than the other and extend further on one side. The denticles look a bit rounded to me and seem very uniform but are really quite small. I counted 5-6 per mm but I had a hard time counting them and am probably wrong lol I THINK it might be a Dromaeosaurid but I am calling it unidentified theropod for now. If you know your dino teeth and feel like giving an opinion, I would love the input. I may not know what it is but I do know that is a pretty nice tooth to have. The serrations are in great shape even though they are small and the tip is worn but not broken. I got it at a reasonable price to so regardless of what it is, I am pretty stoked !
  25. This weekend i made a very lucky find, in the process of cleaning up. Photo's to follow soon. I was very emotional when i picked it up and almost at once saw it was Spinosaur. It mind sound odd ( maybe other fossil hunters may relate to this), that a minute before finding it, i had a strong feeling come across me, of something special nearby. I have identified it as the anterior part of the dentary of a Spinosaur, just before the rostrum begins. There is an eroded partial tooth showing at one end. Maybe more inside the mandibular section. A scan would confirm this. Its 9 cm long, 5.3 cm high and 2.5 cm wide (the corresponding section being a little larger than Baryonyx, which is much younger than this, 125 versus 135 MYA) As far as i know, this would be only the second Spinosaur dentary on the UK mainland, other than the Holotype Baryonyx Walkeri. The isle of Wight (115-125MYA) has had the recent discovery of two Baryonyx , which does have a partial dentary.
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