Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Echinoid'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 209 results

  1. Echinoid

    From the album Fossil Collection

  2. From the album Texas Echinoids, ERose

    Unusually large specimen
  3. Jurassic Echinoid

    From the album Fossil Collection

  4. Jurassic Echinoid

    From the album Fossil Collection

  5. The first week of June I managed to break away from a European excursion with my wife to do a couple hours of collecting in northern Switzerland! We found a boatload of late-Jurassic (Birmenstorf-Member) ammonites and one nice echinoid which should be awesome with some prep! Funny part, on the drive back my wife mentions finding an ammonite that looked like there were nipples on it. Not until we get back to the apartment and start cleaning things off do I discover it was the echinoid she was talking about! *shes a rookie I could use some help with ID confirmation and IDs in general. Taramelliceras callicerum Ochetoceras canaliculatum Paracidaris blumenbachii Trimarginites arolicus (easy because of the grooves on the keel) These have fine ribs, are super thick relative to size but have goniatite type 'sutures' thoughts? (I dont think the far right one is equivalent, i have some other pictures of that one) Assumedly all of these are Perisphinctes, but I cannot tell the difference between all of those ribbed ones to save my life. They may need some prep to help determine Fatter, round keel. Glochiceras? There are quite a few that look like Trimarginites but have smooth keels. Thoughts? Are they just more weathered potentially hiding the grooves on the keel? These, from the paper most closely resemble Glochiceras crenatum but I dont feel like that specimen is closely enough related. I would think those spines along the keep would be easy to ID. One more, its a bid weathered but I figured someone might recognize it. Has some decent sized spines along the edge of the keel (arrows) Euaspidoceras oegir, maybe? Thanks for any help!
  6. I was at the chalk cliffs at Seaford in April this year hunting for echinoids. However, I only found time to clean and prep these fossils this week, using a safety pin, a brush and water (Very low-tech, I know!). UKfossils.co.uk states the rocks here are Cretaceous, 89-86 million years old. I found a fist-sized chunk of chalk that yielded two enchinoderm plates (picture 4) and a very small, unknown fossil. Pictures 1-3 show the unknown fossil. 1 division on the ruler is 1mm. It is perfectly spherical, with a diameter of about 4mm and has raised dimples covering its surface. There are at least two holes, but they are not opposite each other, and I am unsure if these are biological features or just preservational artifacts. My thoughts are this is either a bryozoan or a small echinoid, but I am not sure.
  7. Aristotle's lantern ?

    Hi, I found this crushed echinoid in an Upper Campanian/Lower Maastrichtian stage of the Pyrenees. "Not much of a piece", I tought (likely a Micropsis or a Phymosomatoid). But I wonder if this can be its crushed Aristotle's lantern: Close-up: The other side:
  8. Wellll....a successful day today!!! On my continued quest to find all the echies I found something I never really expected to find- Cretaceous Crinoids! It's Isocrinus annulatus. Also found a crushed up Pygopyrina hancockensis, a nice big one. And one sea urchin spine. So a good day in my book!
  9. Echinoid ID Please

    So yes, I went fossil hunting for the first time with two friends two days ago behind my friend’s grandma’s house in some farmland and we had a blast finding fossil shells of echinoids and gastropods and whatnot. Before we left though, my friend’s grandma gave us this really well preserved fossil of an echinoid (at least compared to our finds) and asked us if we could perhaps find out how old it is. I tried to do some research on the web but its an absolute maze but I stumbled across this forum. So im hoping that through identification, we’ll be able to find out about how old it is because i feel like its the least we could do for my friend’s grandma who entrusted us with this amazing fossils of hers. Anyways, imma get straight to it now. Its was found in some farm land which has some sedimentary rock underneath all the soil. The excavation of this rock to till the ground better has created quite a few piles of this rock here and there which also contain fossils of sea snail shells, some really round looking clams, and echinoids just like the one in the pictures. The rock surrounding the fossils are a really light orangey color and is really easy to chip at or scrape. Probably limestome but not sure cuz im still new to this. This is all located in the Philippines up in the mountains on the island of by the way. It’s 13.5 cm across what I believe is its “front end” to its “back end”, 11cm wide, and about 3 cm tall. Again im new to this so if there are any details that still need to be mentioned or if some additional pictures are needed, please ask because I would feel really bad if i didnt grant this sweet old lady her request. T^T Any info about how old it could possibly date would really mean alot but other info on it would be really great too ^-^
  10. Unidentified

    I am trying to identify the species of a number of incomplete but highly detailed Echinoid ' club' spines ( tubercles ) I have found in one , very small fossil ground in Ibiza ( Balearic Islands ). I want to post photos , but this is my first entry to the forum and, being a bit of a fossil myself I'm not as yet clear on how to do that ! I have been in contact with Andreas Aroh, Editor-in-Chief of the Geological-Paleontological department of the Natural History Museum of Vienna , but all he can tell me on the matter is that he doesn't think they are genus Pseudocidaris , but thinks he may have seen such spines in a paper ......but can't remember when . somebody please explain how I may attach the photos of these spines !
  11. So I am looking for this particular urchin. My grandmother found one when she was a child on the Brazos River outside of Waco TX. Her father sold it to a family friend in the late 1930's and so all I got were the stories of this big round rock that she thought had been "carved by Indians, decorated with dots and snakes". Only much later did she find out that it was a fossilized sea urchin. I am guessing it was a Cidarid, possibly Phyllacanthus or or Paracidaris. All I know is I am determined to find one someday. I would trade my entire collection of fossils for one of those big echies. (If anyone happens to have one just laying around.....let's talk! hahah) . I have been trying to learn the different formations and I stalk the Fossil Forum regularly to learn what I can. When I saw a post by @KimTexan about a Cidarid ID I realized she had found what I had been looking for! (Kim, I am so very jealous of your find!) So, my husband and I set out on one of our "little hunting trips" - we like to take two or three day excursions around Texas - he gets to go ghost hunting at night (we stay at haunted hotels and B&B's) and I get to go fossking during the day. I mapped out some likely spots and we set out from our little town of San Marcos heading north to HIllsboro (excellent home made icecream at A Tisket A Tasket on the Courthouse Square) and then to Granbury where we stayed at the Nutt House Hotel. Stopped at two spots that I thought likely to find my urchin but alas. No luck. Found some nice heart urchins and some "new to me" oysters and a couple of nice chucks of ammonites. I think this was Washita formation? I am using the Rockd App on my phone to try to pinpoint formation since I am definitely not familiar with formations, especially up "north". One of my happy finds was a Pinna Comancheana (far left "cone shaped" fossil) I've only found one other of those. Next morning we headed up to Lake Benbrook Spillway with a stopover at a large roadcut on "Scorpion Hill". This I believe was Glen Rose as most of the finds were heart urchins and gastros. Nothing new to me here, but I did find some better specimens than I had collected previously. Lake Benbrook was a neat place. Two other fossikers were out, I went over to say hello, wondering if they were experienced hunters and knew the area, but nope, they were new to Lake Benbrook, just as I was. I did not get to catch up with them after to see if they found anything good. I was amazed a the large ammonite impressions in the limestone beds. My camera wasn't working, so alas, no pictures. Found lots of nice Oxytopodiceras fragments and a couple of others I haven't identified yet. Pics in next post:
  12. I found "A SPOT" finally!! Found 7 species of echinoids, and am over the moon! I am able to ID some but not all. Could use a little help please! Location: Comal County near Canyon Lake TX. Cretaceous Glen Rose. I'll post pics of the others i have tentatively ID'd in the comments post, I would appreciate confirmation on those too. Here are the ones I am not sure about: I thought these first ones were Coenholectypus, but they are very "off center". But they could just be squished. Is this Pseudodiadema perhaps? Perhaps too small and busted up a specimen to ID. Thanks for your help!!
  13. Echinoid parts - Texas Pennsylvanian

  14. Sand dollar prep

    Today I decided to try and prep a Sand dollar that was found by @digit and given to me at our March hunt at Cookie Cutter Creek. There was a good amount of matrix covering the top and bottom of this echinoid. While my main focus was uncovering the top portion I decided to also work on the bottom as well. Unfortunately I deleted the before pic by accident, but I took a pic that shows the pile of debris that I have removed so far. This is a work in progress so I will post more pics as I continue to work on it. First pic shows the top 2nd pic shows the bottom. As you can see from the pic all I have used so far is a pin vise and dental pic.
  15. Diplodetus Echinoid

  16. I decided on a whim to go fossil hunting yesterday. I took off on the 2 hr drive to get to my favorite area the North Sulphur River Texas. I jumped off in three creeks to see footprints everywhere. I decided to go try a creek I spotted a few years ago but never tried. It paid off. I found my first NSR echinoid after 4yrs of heavy hunting. Echinoids are quite rare at NSR. I also found a really cool Pachydiscus ammonite with an Inoceramid on it. I think I"ll try that creek again in the future.
  17. Echinoid Tetragramma.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Echinoid Tetragramma ( I believe, due to the size and the pentagonal opening...very water worn, obviously) Found in Bell County
  18. Echinoid Pliotoxaster.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Echinoids Pliotoxaster Sea Urchins Commonly called Heart Urchins Found in Bandera County
  19. Echinoid Salenia(5).JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Echinoid Salenia mexicana (?) Found in Hays County
  20. Echinoid loriola (2).JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Echinoids Loriola Sea Urchins Found in Hays and Comal Counties
  21. Echinoid Coenholectypus Austin.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Echinoid Coenholectypus Sea Urchin Found in Travis County
  22. Echinoid Heteraster.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Echinoids Heteraster Commonly known as Heart Urchins Found in Hays County
  23. Pretty sure this is coenholectypus but am stumped on the species. It's bigger than the planatus I have found previously and from the underside you can definitely see the more pentagonal shape like a transpecosensis (can you tell I've been looking in my Field Guide to Texas Fossils?). I found it in Salado Creek in Bell County, do not know what formation. Obviously very water worn, and it is weirdly wonky, (why would it be so dismorphic?) but it sure is a big one! I was rather excited to find this one! Also found this- it looks like a sponge? (Pictures in comments) But I can't really find any fossil sponge from Cretaceous era that look similar. Could just be limestone. I hope it's a sponge. Any help is appreciated!
  24. Day Two ; Locality One (or Six if you include Day One) Black Sahara, South of Erfoud 20th February 2019 Well this is where things really get interesting, so stick with this thread as there are dozens of photos of fossils coming up. Looks at the tags if you want clues. I was up bright and early and wandered out at about 7 am to watch the sun rise over the still mighty Erg Chebbi dunes. And as night's candles were burnt out and jocund day stood tiptoe over the misty duney tops, the chaps came to join me and managed lots of photos. Here's one, if you would like to see more, I'm busy posting a kazillion of 'em under the Nature Photography thread.
  25. I found this Phlycticrioceras trinodosum heteromorph specimen in June of 2018 whilst hunting the middle/upper Coniacian Atco formation. It is the largest fragment of this species that I am aware of, having a whorl height of 51 mm as opposed to 47 mm of the largest fragment I've seen published. This genus is a bigger, rarer, and (mostly) younger cousin of Allocrioceras. I sent pictures of it to Keith Minor and he pointed out that there was also an echinoid sticking out of the specimen, something which I had totally missed! With much of the echinoid still stuck in the living chamber it is hard to get a definitive ID. But because it has such a shallow anterior ambulacra, which gives the anterior end a more smooth rather than definitive heart shape, he ruled out both Mecaster texanus and batensis. He suggested Micraster since the site has a strong European component in both the bivalve and ammonite faunas, and because the periproct side has the right shape. From finding other, although not as well preserved specimens that show similar morphology he appears to be right. I have yet to confirm this ID with Andrew Smith, but either way I think the piece is worth showing. And reading this thread got me thinking about how this could have happened and what effect it could have had on the echinoid's preservation. My thought is that because irregular echinoids lived and today still live most of their lives burrowing in the sediment it is unlikely that it would have crawled into the living chamber, but instead that it was blown into it post-mortem via currents that had dredged it out of the sediment. I already know that this site was a high energy environment from my other finds here so this seems the most likely possibility to me. But because of the fact there is still at least one spine still attached to the specimen it could not have been swept up from the sediment too long after death or all of its hairlike spines would have blown away. I do, however, find it interesting that it is positioned anterior first with its posterior towards the aperture, the position I would expect to see it in if it had indeed crawled into the shell. The specimen is also the best preserved echinoid from this site so far. Despite the ammonites being generally well preserved and not too crushed, most of the echinoids that I have from the site are terribly crushed, flakey, and often infested with rotting pyrite. I think being encapsulated in the chamber very much reduced those effects. Even though the ammonite and the echinoid are a bit crushed, the echinoid would have probably been worse off otherwise. The heteromorph fragment length is 70 mm and the whorl breadth, being a bit crushed, is 13 mm. I would think that this specimen, with its open planispiral coiling, would would have been at least over a foot in diameter when complete. It is the robust (female) morph of the species with a rib index of 5½. For comparison in Fig. 1 I pictured it with my most complete P. trinodosum specimen. From the part of the echinoid that is exposed I can measure 25 mm in length, 25 in width, and a thickness of 8 mm. I have also found abundant yet scattered fish remains at the site, so perhaps one day an ammonite-fish will come my way. But until then, anyone else got ammonite-echinoids to show? Fig. 1. Fig. 2.
×