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Found 13 results

  1. Edestus Prep

    @DSMJake sent me this beautiful Edestus jaw to prep and I got the chance to work on it today. After a week of relaxing in the prep lab, chilling with the phytosaur, it came out of the box looking like this: To all appearances, it is simply covered in shale and the prep would require some simple abrasion. But as we all know, appearances aren’t everything! Under a good portion of the shale was a pile of pyritized shells! So, I abraided what I could and set to work with the Micro Jack. After the shells were gone, it went back into the cabinet for some more abrasive. After the abrasive, I blew the whole thing off and scrubbed the leftover soda off with acetone. The broken end of the bone had some cracking to deal with so they got a bit of super glue and the whole thing received a good consolidation. Why the whole thing you ask? Under the shale, the bone is also pyritized and the teeth are cracked with some enamel on the serrations missing. In order to lock all that down and reduce the risk of eventual pyrite decay, the whole piece got 2 good coats of thin Vinac. All this took a grand total of 3 hours of work.
  2. Our shark adaptation education program for elementary students follows up the Cladodonts with three of the craziest looking early sharks and three that we think kids will love learning about. The Eugeneodontid "sharks" may not be sharks but they are just too cool not to teach the kids about. Bizarre is interesting and I also love talking about evolutionary extremes. The best part of these next animals is that they each allow my son to really stretch out as an artist and create some weird looking creatures. The kids will learn that Edestus were large, predatory shark-like fish that are related to modern ratfish. We will quickly cover the tooth whorl which is where the term Scissor-tooth comes from. I have been reading theories as to how the teeth were used and I think it will be fun to discuss possible feeding methods with the kids. We will not spend much time on Listracanthus because there is not much information about them. I have seen them described as being eel-like and covered in the "feather" denticles. This is one that is really about the artwork so my son is the star with this species. Can not wait to see his finished rendition. I think the kids will really love Stethacanthus. I know it is a cladodont but we separate it in the presentation. The Anvil Shark is a wild creature. The anvil shaped, denticle covered spine, patch of spine on its head, and the whip-like projections from the pectoral fins are adaptations that are open to debate. Asking open ended questions with this species will be more fun than giving the kids theories. What do you think the spines were used for and what do you think those whips are all about? The kids will guide the presentation about Stethacanthus. While we wont be adding any additional Cladodont fossils any time soon, I do hope to add either Caseodus or Campodus to our collection before the end of spring. I like the Eugeneodontids as artistic subjects for my son so we will pick up more of these fossils as we progress. Our presentation fossils Pic 1- Edestus heinrichi. This is an Illinois coal mine fossil, dated to between 360-320 mya. Another personal favorite. These are not common and it is pretty cool to be able to show this one to students. Pic 2- Listracanthus. A "feather" denticle from the Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian in Iowa. Not the best example as it is difficult to see but a good photograph will help. Still it is cool just to have the Feather Shark in the program ! Pic 3- Stethacanthus altonesis. One of the two teeth we have from the Caney Shale Formation in Oklahoma. Again, it is just too cool to have Stethacanthus fossils. I do not know how rare they are or anything but it is just such a freaky little creature.
  3. Did I find a partial Edestus tooth ?

    I was given a jar of fossil shark teeth by a friend who knows I use them in education. These were collected on beaches in Florida but some of unknown origin seemed to be mixed in with the lemon, dusky, and sand tiger teeth. As I went through the teeth, one really jumped out as soon as I saw it. It did not look like the rest of teeth and it looked very similar to the Edestus tooth I have in my collection. I can not say for sure but I honestly can not think of anything else it is. In the pictures, the top tooth is my Edestus. The bottom is the partial that appears to be an edestus. Anybody have an opinion on this ?
  4. Edestus prep

    I picked up this jaw recently and would like to have it cleaned up. I’m fairly certain I’d ruin it if I tried anything myself. Anyone have recommendations for a prep guy/gal? Thanks!
  5. Edestus teeth

    From the album Sharks and fish

    The shark relative is genus of eugenodontia holocephalid from the Carboniferous-Pennsylvanian age Anna shale formation, Carbondale group, found in different Illinois coal mines. I dont know(yet)which mine these were found in. This unidentified species is of the "vorax-serratus- crenulatus-heinrichi" or "E. heinrichi group", with the teeth being more of a standard triangular shape, as opposed to being thinner and pointed at a forward angle as in the "E. minor" group http://www.thefossilforum.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=501751
  6. Edestus "shark"

    Does anyone know much about the edestus? Ive always wondered about their teeth as they age. All sharks and fish(and animals), when they're young their teeth are also small. Edestus are supposed to never lose their teeth, like their buddy helicoprion(right?), and just have their jaws continue to extend out from their mouths over time. That being the case, how are the oldest teeth, from when they were little young things, full sized, or almost full sized, as they always are? The jaw bone starts off small at the tip, but quickly thickens, but the teeth start large. Also, does that mean that they are born with just a single tooth on the top and bottom, and grow new teeth at an unheard of slow rate?
  7. Edestus sp.

    This is a sketch of Edestus, a 300 million year old shark from the Carboniferous. This is one of my favorite Carboniferous creatures, because it's a shark with scissor jaws! This was a fun project because remains of edestus are limited to jaws so I have the creative freedom to make the animal look any way I'd like. To make the skull I incorporated some goblin shark elements. I feel like a goblin shark with scissor jaws would be quite terrifying! I did however make some changes because I did not want the end result to end up looking just like a goblin shark. The eyes are inspired by the Mako shark. I think the huge eyes make for a creepy looking animal. The body is also mako inspired. The most frustrating step in this drawing was making the shadows. I wanted the white belly to have a shadow but if I made the shadow to dark it would appear as a dark colored belly. Overall i I like how it came out. I think the skull may need some work but that's why I'm posting here so I could get some opinions!
  8. Edestus

    Been lucky enough to add a few edestus jaws in my collection recently
  9. I was looking for some advice on what to do with this edestus tooth. How can I tell if there are anymore teeth under the matrix? It looks like the enamel continues on for a bit further but I can’t tell how much further or if there are anymore teeth. I was wondering if there are any experts here that can tell just by looking at it. I want to leave the tooth and jaw in the matrix because I already have a jaw and tooth out of the matrix. Should I try to clean some matrix away from the tooth? if so how far? Or should I leave it as is because I know how fragile these are? thanks for any help.
  10. Hello I am looking for an edestus jaw I have a saltasaurus osteoderm 5.75 inch megalodon tooth along with many more shark teeth and Floridian fossils such as a partial Columbian mammoth tooth etc.
  11. Show me your Fossil Collections!

    I am new to this forum, and I was pleasantly surprised with the friendly and immediate, helpful, educated responses I received when I asked for help ID-ing dromaeosur teeth! Thank you Troodon and Runner64 for your help! This seems like an active, educated forum where lovers of prehistoric life can gather to discuss fossils, and the like. So, I would like to show off my fossil collection, and discuss things about the small amount of material I have in my personal collection! Feel free to show me your collections as well, I would love to see them! So without further ado, on to my fossils!
  12. Edestus heinrichi Tooth

    Hi, I was just wondering what was considered large for a single Edestus heinrichi tooth. I have recently bought one and it was around 1.6" wide. It was labeled as being big, but I just wanted another more experienced opinion on it. Thanks for your time.
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