Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Extinction'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 30 results

  1. back from the future:end-Permian events

    VAIMCLOUH End-Permian (252 Mya) deforestation, wildfires and flooding—An ancient biotic crisis with lessons for the present Vivi Vajda,, StephenMcLoughlin, Chris Mays, Tracy D.Frank, Christopher R.Fielding, AllenTevyaw, Veiko Lehsten, Malcolm Bocking, Robert S.Nicoll Earth and Planetary Science Letters 529(2020)115875 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! NB: 7,3 Mb editorial note: Having some pre-existing knowledge of organic petrology,palynology,geochemistry would be helpful
  2. Humans pushed cave bears to extinction, their DNA suggests Washington Post, By Ben Guarino, August 15 2019 https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/08/15/humans-pushed-cave-bears-extinction-their-dna-suggests/ Gretzinger, J., Molak, M., Reiter, E., Pfrengle, S., Urban, C., Neukamm, J., Blant, M., Conard, N.J., Cupillard, C., Dimitrijević, V. and Drucker, D.G., 2019. Large-scale mitogenomic analysis of the phylogeography of the Late Pleistocene cave bear. Scientific reports, 9. (open access) https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-47073-z Yours, Paul H.
  3. until
    NORTH COAST FOSSIL CLUB APRIL MEETING Our main speaker will be Nathan Smith who is a volunteer in the Vertebrate Paleontology Department at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. The title of his talk will be "The Mesozoic Extinction". For this month's Collector's Corner you are invited to bring in your Mesozoic/Cretaceous Fossils for showing others and sharing information. The Public is Welcome!!!
  4. What were the largest animals to survive the KT extinction?
  5. It seems to me that our feral horses should be considered "Native Wildlife" like any other. Why did horses in North America go extinct?
  6. Anyone seen the new paper on the possible causes of megalodon extinction? Haven't had a chance to read more than the abstract yet, but looks interesting: https://peerj.com/articles/6088/ @Gizmo
  7. KT boundary micro glass

    From the album Invertebrates and plants(& misc.)

    Debris, including micro glass "beads" from melted earth ejected into the air, from the KT boundary burn layer. Garfield county, Montana, Hell Creek formation. Late cretaceous (duh) *i added "misc." to this album because this didn't fit anywhere, and I thought it was really cool and should definitely be included somewhere. **There could even be vaporized dinosaur material as part of the glass and melted debris included. There definitely was plenty of it, but I guess realistically, unless it became evenly spread into the atmosphere and airborne debris, this is too small an amount of ejecta, and by percentage such a minuscule amount of vaporized dino, so sadly there probably isn't any.
  8. Here's Why Over 80% of All Life on Earth Was Wiped Out 250 Million Years Ago. A chain reaction of death. https://www.sciencealert.com/end-permian-triassic-extinction-event-volcano-eruption-lithospheric-halogens https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180827121348.htm https://phys.org/news/2018-08-geologists-uncover-clues-largest-mass.html https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-08/uota-gun082418.php the paper is: Michael W. Broadley, Peter H. Barry, Chris J. Ballentine, Lawrence A. Taylor and Ray Burgess, 2018, End-Permian extinction amplified by plume-induced release of recycled lithospheric volatiles. Nature Geoscience https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-018-0215-4 Yours, Paul H.
  9. Hello! I´m learning more about earlier mammoth species, and have some questionmarks when it comes to mammoth meridionalis. Most of the literature says that the specie lived between 2,5 - 1,5 million years ago. But I´ve been in contact with a seller, and this seller claims that there were meridionalis mammoths living in Hungary between 800.000 - 1.000.000 years ago. The seller also said that meridionalis fossils they´ve found/bought from north sea have sometimes been between 1.000.000 - 1.500.000 years old. The fact that the information is so different, have made me pretty confused. And I´m also questioning the fact that I haven´t found a more detailed story of the actual extinction of the specie? It´s a very trustful team of sellers I´m talking about, and I´ve been buying several fossils from them and haven´t been given any reason to not trust them so far. But since there is a gap of fivehundred thousand years, at least, I still want to reach out for the opinion of others. Because now I don´t really know what to think.. Ps. I´m thankful for any little details you can give me!
  10. About 3 years ago I was walking along the dunes by the river, across from Farewell Bend State park on the Idaho side. I noticed that there was what looked to be an abnormal amount of crystallized and glassy material, conglomerates, basalt and lots of sand. The sand can be explained by the presence of mud volcanos and hydrothermal vents that can be seen in satellite photos. My premature analysis and imagination were wild with fantasy. The samples I was collecting were like nothing I've ever seen. I knew something was up, but there were and are, still more questions to answer. Idaho Falls sits at ~4700ft above sea level. Farewell Bend is ~2300ft. Making the Treasure Valley of Idaho a 340mi basin that becomes a bottleneck at Farewell Bend, which would explain the accumulation and abnormal variety of material. I have always been good to pay attention to the composition of the soil and rock in my environment. Usually the material is pretty consistent, but I've seen nothing like the variety that is here. Traveling upriver deposits of glacial stone are evident in the bends of the river, indicating ice jams that built up on the tips of islands. The stones are always upriver of the islands. About 30mi to the Northwest is a very large cement plant run by the largest cement manufacturer in the nation, Ash Grove. I'm still working on understanding the erosion and possibility of run-off and river flows changing the route in which the Treasure Valley drains. The Idaho State Fossil is the Hagerman Horse, which is from an abnormal collection. "Ultimately five nearly complete skeletons, more than 100 skulls, and forty-eight lower jaws as well as numerous isolated bones were found." (wikipedia) There are a few theories as to how the bones made it there is such large numbers. One theory being that they were swept up in a flash flood, ~3.5mya. My own personal theory is if the horses could have been herded by the Native peoples and eaten. The more I look into it though, I see that it is more likely that this is not an isolated event. The deposits in the Hagerman beds may have been, but the odd numbers of bones vs. complete skeletons points at dismembered animals in my opinion. Just as this flash flood 3.5mya could have wiped out the Hagerman Horse, so too could have the human population that would have been very likely to have populated the Treasure Valley region in much larger numbers than we currently understand. Further passed Farewell Bend the Snake River winds into Hells Canyon. The Hells Canyon is the deepest gorge on the North American Continent. Which, to me, says a couple of things. #1 Must be the oldest, Orrrrr #2 Must have had the most aggressive run off which carved it deeper than the Grand Canyon. These are questions will be investigated further as my collection of maps and topographics grows. I am working on understanding what allowed the formation of valleys and plains through the Treasure/Magic Valley ranges, and the lower elevations from the Blue Mountains north to the Cascade range which also has the not so mountainous regions that, by the tectonics in the area, should not exist like they do. Ancient inland seas are what I am looking at currently. Satellite photographs seem to suggest there was a drainage that went to the south and I believe that there were more salts in the waters in these Idaho waters. Which looks to have drained towards Salt Lake. This easily could have been via aquifer, or by displacement from meteoric impact. There has been some problem with correlation because "~" timelines are a bit loose when it comes to lining up events. For instance, the flood that apparently killed the horses in the Hagerman beds was ~3.5mya. Geologists seem to like this ~3my marker for some reason. Same with this is the 12,000 - 15,000ya mentions, some reports mention that the abrupt end to the last Ice Age was ~12-15,000ya. Which, only really gives me direction to look into whether or not, and how the end of this ice age caused the flooding and debris to completely chew up the fossil record and make it incredible hard to identify locations and patterns in events. The "quaternary" deposits at Farewell Bend do and do not make sense. So, while the standard may be to look at a USGS map of deposits to determine what minerals and fossils might be where, it becomes a problem in Idaho because by the elevation drop and the likely age of the Snake River, literally every single time period "should" be represented in the deposits that have accumulated at Farewell Bend. Though, they might just fit somehow in the corresponding periods of deposits, but will need to be given a new description for how the periods are represented in these constantly modified deposits. Suevite chucks, Still working on getting the equipment to make slices. Recommendations I need to head back to the site to take photos of the large suevite boulders that are very clearly ejecta from an impact. Where the top of the boulder is exposed and shattered from weathering. The boulders have a mix of glass, crystal, concretions and stones showing shock induced spallation. The "eggs" previously hypothesized are likely to be shock induced spallation, still wondering how that may occur in an egg though. If an egg were to be fossilized prior to the shock, what would the effects be? Picture showing glass on concretion from suevite boulder. The glass inclusion shattered when chipping it free from the suevite. Part two of this post will be more photos that show the variety of samples collected. It is taking me quite a while to set all of this up. I plan for this to be a regularly updated post. Please, if anyone has any feedback or wisdom, please by all means, I'm here for correction in this critical analysis. One of my favorite things in learning is to be wrong, because that means my autistic thought process has investigated why it's not right, even if I don't know it yet. Suggestions, regarding missing considerations or needed analysis, please school me. I find it difficult to manage my tangents at times. Cited: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hagerman_horse (web, 2018) https://www.britannica.com/place/Hagerman-Fossil-Beds-National-Monument (web, 2018)
  11. Poisonous Plants Killed Off Dinosaurs

    Poisonous angiosperms might has caused the dinosaur extinctions because they could not taste the poisons in the plants. Warning, do not suffer the same fate; do not eat large amounts of spinach. http://www.techtimes.com/articles/224517/20180405/turns-out-dinosaurs-were-killed-off-by-flowers-then-the-asteroid-put-the-nail-in-the-coffin.htm
  12. NICE!!http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.2001663&type=printable 51 Mb,highly recommended, first description of a new species,Alcione. A cladistic analysis is included,BTW. Very ,very solid documentation of the material
  13. This ancient climate catastrophe is our best clue about Earth’s future Sarah Kaplan, the Washington Post, March 27, 2018 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2018/03/27/this-ancient-climate-catastrophe-is-our-best-clue-about-earths-future/?utm_term=.9b31f277e13c https://www.sciencealert.com/this-ancient-climate-catastrophe-may-provide-clues-for-for-facing-ours Yours, Paul H.
  14. Below is an interesting paper about mass extinctions. Racki, G. 2012. The Alvarez impact theory of mass extinction; limits to its applicability and the "great expectations syndrome". Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 57 (4): 681-702. https://www.app.pan.pl/archive/published/app57/app20110058.pdf https://www.app.pan.pl/article/item/app20110058.html https://www.researchgate.net/publication/239739714_The_Alvarez_impact_theory_of_mass_extinction_limits_to_its_applicability_and_the_great_expectations_syndrome https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Grzegorz_Racki http://agro.icm.edu.pl/agro/element/bwmeta1.element.agro-d1182c96-9ae1-48af-858c-a2f844a3d830/c/app20110058_681.pdf Other papers are: Racki, G., 2015. Catastrophism and neocatastrophism versus cosmic hazard: Ager versus Alvarez; Cuvier versus Laplace. Palaios, 30(6), pp. 432-434. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.894.7456&rep=rep1&type=pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/279238673_Catastrophism_and_neocatastrophism_versus_cosmic_hazard_Ager_versus_Alvarez_Cuvier_versus_Laplace Racki, G., 2014. Dmitri Sobolev and other forgotten forerunners of mass extinction science and volcanic catastrophism. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 59(4), pp. 1006-1008. http://yadda.icm.edu.pl/yadda/element/bwmeta1.element.agro-c20648d9-6f1c-454b-b6ce-c2fd0eb7a061/c/app20141004_1006_1008.pdf https://www.infona.pl/resource/bwmeta1.element.agro-c20648d9-6f1c-454b-b6ce-c2fd0eb7a061 Yours, Paul H.
  15. The Alien Observatory --"The Vast Majority of Fossils Discovered in the Universe Will Be Extinct Microbial Life, Not Dinosaurs or Humanoids" The Daily Galaxy January 14, 2018 http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2018/01/the-alien-observatory-the-vast-majority-of-fossils-discovered-in-the-universe-will-be-extinct-microb.html A paper is: Chopra, A. and Lineweaver, C.H., 2016. The case for a Gaian bottleneck: the biology of habitability. Astrobiology, 16(1), pp. 7-22. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/291334824_The_Case_for_a_Gaian_Bottleneck_The_Biology_of_Habitability? https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Charley_Lineweaver http://magonia.com/files/the-case-for-a-gaian-bottleneck.pdf http://www.nso.lt/science/content/bottleneck.pdf Another paper is: Lineweaver, C.H., 2009. Paleontological tests: human-like intelligence is not a convergent feature of evolution. In From fossils to astrobiology (pp. 353-368). Springer, Dordrecht. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241315068_Paleontological_Tests_HumanLike_Intelligence_Is_Not_a_Convergent_Feature_of_Evolution https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Charley_Lineweaver Yours, Paul H.
  16. LAST AFRICAN DINOSAUR

    A bit of an old one, but from a local perspective: https://www.moroccoworldnews.com/2017/05/218258/last-african-dinosaur-discovered-in-morocco-oulad-abdoun-basin/
  17. Today I managed to explore and observe an exposure of the Queenston formation up close here in Hamilton, Ontario. I chose a site along the Red Hill Valley Expressway that was easy to access and get down to for a close look. The creek is right next to the highway. I have always passed by this exposure and anticipated the day I'll be able to observe it. The Queenston formation is the last Ordovician formation in south-western Ontario before the rocks hit the Silurian age. The Queenston is what overlains the Georgian Bay formation, the formation I use to hunt in frequently in Toronto, Ontario. This is Red Hill Creek as it passes by next to the Highway.
  18. Fossils reveal how bizarre mammal beat extinction Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, August 24, 2017 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170824182708.htm https://phys.org/news/2017-08-fossils-reveal-bizarre-mammal-extinction.html https://phys.org/news/2017-08-caribbean-mammal-extinctions-spurs-renewed.html Yours, Paul H.
  19. Extinction of Mainland and Island Mammoth Populations in Alaska 6,000 Years Ago, Royal Tyrrell Museum Speaker Series 2017 Dr. Duane Froese, University of Alberta, presents new research on the extinction of mammoths and other megafauna from Arctic North America and the causes of the final extinction of a population on St. Paul Island, Alaska, about 6000 years ago. Some of the papers referenced in the talk are: Graham, R.W., Belmecheri, S., Choy, K., Culleton, B.J., Davies, L.J., Froese, D., Heintzman, P.D., Hritz, C., Kapp, J.D., Newsom, L.A. and Rawcliffe, R., 2016. Timing and causes of mid-Holocene mammoth extinction on St. Paul Island, Alaska. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, p. 9310–9314. Guthrie, R.D., 2006. New carbon dates link climatic change with human colonization and Pleistocene extinctions. Nature, 441(7090), pp. 207-209. Palkopoulou, E., Dalén, L., Lister, A.M., Vartanyan, S., Sablin, M., Sher, A., Edmark, V.N., Brandström, M.D., Germonpré, M., Barnes, I. and Thomas, J.A., 2013, November. Holarctic genetic structure and range dynamics in the woolly mammoth. In Proc. R. Soc. B (Vol. 280, No. 1770, 9 pp.) The Royal Society. Yours, Paul H.
  20. Floridian dugong extinction

    Hugolee has a recent post showing pictures of dugong bone. The responses to his post tickled my interest in the subject and caused me to do a little research on both manatees and dugongs. I am now more intelligent regarding this subject, BUT could not figure out a question that came to mind. Any help in educating me is appreciated!! Waters in Florida must have been infested with dugongs for as many bones that are found. Dugongs in Florida died out at the time that manatees arrived. WHY???? Was it possible that manatees outcompeted the dugongs? I saw a cold snap was given as a reason for a particular population studied. Was this the reason for all dugongs? If so, why did the manatees survive the cold? Just askin!!! Mike
  21. Bison in Iowa

    Does anyone know when Bison died out in Iowa? I myself have a single vertebrae and the front lower left half of a buffalo jaw with 2 teeth in it. I think it must be any wear from 500-to a couple thousand years as it is dark brown in color. 16 - 1.webp
  22. Back to the Cretaceous badlands. Fall has come to the Alberta Badlands and cooler temperatures. This is a positive for exploring the steeper slopes and KT dino extinction boundary high above the Red Deer River. This report is a bit top heavy in scenery photos. Didn't want to get sidetracked by fossils along long trek through lower levels or would never make it up to the destination. Encountered Bullwinkle a couple of kms before our driving destination. Lots of wildlife this day including grouse, mule deer , coyotes and a million migrating waterfowl. Need to push our way through some non-badland topography. Boreal and aspen forests.
  23. According to this recent study, the popular belief that mammals diversified after the extinction that killed the non-avian dinosaurs is incorrect; mammals diversified in the shadow of the dinos long before the extinction, and actually had a drop in diversity after it. The reason for this diversification was the evolution of angiosperms (flowering plants), which provided mammals with new food sources. Research paper: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/283/1832/20160256 Simplified version: http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/early-mammals-diversification-03931.html
  24. Interesting paper that suggests ichthyosaurs went extinct because of climate change. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-09/ichthyosaurs-may-have-been-wiped-out-by-climate-change/7230400 Izak
  25. Meteorites & Gravity

    Could all of the large meteorite impacts, especially the one(s) that drove the dinosaurs to extinction, increase the earths gravity? And if so is it likely this is a big factor in the next evolutionary step for dinosaurs, feathered flight?
×