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Found 136 results

  1. Fern Fossil New Mexico?

    It is from New Mexico, likely from Pennsylvanian formations. Is it a fern?
  2. Fossil Fern.

    Macroneuropteris macrophylla, a Neuropteris-like group seed fern, or Fern. Not sure if the matrix is shale. Could this be from Mazon Creek. Illinois? 4 x 3 5/8th x 2 1/2 inch. I am rather sure it is North American. Macroneuropteris macrophylla, a Neuropteris-like group seed fern or Fern. Age: ca 314 Mya
  3. Need help with ID

    I’ve just recently found this fossil in the North Attleboro fossil locality and need help identifying, it is a little bit longer than a half inch
  4. Hello! and I hope you are having a wonderful afternoon! I found these two plant fossils and was unsure to what they might actually be. They look a lot like modern seeds but I know I am not always informed and I keep having a slight suspicion they could be apart of some other plant material! If anyone could help identify and confirm these plant fossils I would be very grateful! I have found leaves from Neuropteris sp , Cyclopteris sp, and a few other plant species in these types of limestone! Info that I could gather: Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Possibly Upper Winterset Limestone Specimen #1: Two halves of one seed? (roughly 9mm) Other half: Specimen #2: Larger and wider seed? (roughly 3mm) I unfortunately do not have the other half to this one!
  5. Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

  6. Cyclopteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    The leaf section of the specimen is 3.6cm wide and length is 3.3cm long!
  7. Is this a fern?

    Found this back in April on a mountain, still amazed by the detail. Not sure what species it is, the area is mostly Carboniferous.
  8. Hello! I have found a few ferns at a road-cut and was wondering if anyone could identify these ferns below! I have found trilobites (small), Neuropteris fern leaves, many Calamites, and ocean invertebrates in the area. I was very lucky to find these plant fossils as they appear to be relatively uncommon in the road cut area! Specimen #1: I found this lovely leaf with a few imprints of fern fossil right next to it! (3.5cm) Specimen #2: A lovely... Ginkgo? I had posted this previously on a different website and noted it looked like a Gingko. I was not sure as the leaf has a more rounded edge and not a split edge like the Ginkgo I saw online Nevertheless it could be a squished Ginkgo or a related species! Specimen #3: A lovely leaf and one of my largest that I was able to find (5.3cm) Specimen #4: A beautiful fern fossil leaf (3.4cm) Some general information I was able to gather from the area! Time period: Pennsylvanian Location: Missouri Formation: Upper Winterset Limestone Thanks to Missourian For the possible Formation ID
  9. Calamite #2

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    One of my favorite Calamites due to how well preserved its internal anatomy is! I gave this to a friend's little brother who loves fossils.
  10. Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    One of my favorite finds comes in at roughly 2.8cm and has two beautiful leaves next to each other!
  11. Cyclopteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

  12. Possibly Cyclopteris, Or Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    This specimen is roughly 5.3Cm!
  13. Pennsylvanian Plant ID Help

    These fossils were found in Westville, IL (Vermillion County) a long time ago by my great grandfather (the grey/black fossil; he worked in the coal mine), and my dad (the light brown/reddish one; on a slag heap). After reading this Publication Title: Guide to Pennsylvanian fossil plants of Illinois Publication Type: Geoscience Education Series Author: James R. Jennings Year: 1990 and looking at a number of photos for comparison, I am wondering if these are Alethopteris sertii? (other guesses are Neuropteris and Acitheca). At least that is my (un)educated guess after desperately trying to make sense of the Jennings paper. Also, on the first photo within the green box I noticed that the foliage has two different looks to it. Were the individual leaves (?) different or is this a result of the way the plant was fossilized? I appreciate all corrections and additional knowledge/comments on these two fossils. This forum identified a nautiloid I have, and I am so appreciative of the feedback and support you give!
  14. Bunch of fossils, might buy

    The ones I know are the crinoid plate, knighta, PA fossil fern, dactylioceras, random ammonite, two moroccon trilobites. However, I have no idea what the middle yellow like imprint is nor the two species of black trilobite in shale. And then the two upper left fossils have me clueless. Wanted to know what they are before I consider buying. Thanks again for any help. Again, no location or collection information.
  15. Zeilleria Fern (?)

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Peek a boo! A Carboniferous Zeilleria fern from northern Pennsylvania is exposed through a chip in the shale. Normally I'd just chip it out, but I'm thinking I might just leave this as is. It appeals to the artist in me. Lewellyn Formation Pottstown Member
  16. Plant Hash Plate

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    1) Shrub/vining plant - Spenophyllum majus 2) unidentified seed fern 3) Neuropteris sp. 4) Scale tree- Lepidodendron sp. 5) Seed Fern- Alethopteris sp. 6) Seed Fern- Neuropteris? 7) Shrub/vining plant- Sphenophyllum sp. McIntyre Mt., Ralston, PA Pottstown member, Lewellyn Fm. Carboniferous
  17. Pecopteris sp.

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern leaf Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  18. Neuropteris ovata

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern leaf with colorful iron oxide coating left by the plant itself Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  19. Neuropteris ovata

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern pinnae Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  20. Alethopteris2.JPG

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Tree Fern leaf impression Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  21. Alethopteris fern with Cordaites leaf

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Tree Fern Leaflet The white highlights are most likely kaolinite left from the plant itself. Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  22. A very small group of us ventured into the wilds of northern PA last weekend, equipped with masks and a permit to poke around a state wildlife preserve with Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation exposures. It was a gorgeous day and the colors of the limestone really shone in the sunlight. As we got there, a pair of permit-less fossil poachers were just leaving. How do I know that they didn't have a permit? Because they absolutely did not follow the rules. Since it is a wildlife preserve, it is important that anyone looking for fossils not leave craterous holes in the ground and replant any plants that were uprooted in the process of digging said holes. They left holes everywhere. Our intrepid permit holder filled in most of the holes so that she could keep getting permits in the future. For this reason, I'm not going to be any more specific about the location. That said, there were so many wonderful plant fossils to find! The site is remarkable for its red, orange and yellow limestone, which makes for some terrific, high-contrast fossils. Many of them had crisp details. What's more, there was quite a variety.
  23. Hello, I was wondering where to find PA fern fossils. I've heard of both the Carbondale and St. Clair sites, but I've read these are both closed to collecting. Where else could I find some decent fern fossils? I am from NJ (so this would have to be on the East/Central parts of PA for a day trip).
  24. Chinese style hot dogs for breakfast.The "hot dog" was invented only in the last twenty years, and is a model of Chinese and Western combination:).I don't know if you've ever heard of steamed bread. The steamed bread is outside and the sausage is inside.It actually tastes ok.Then I drank some soy milk.Soybean milk is also a popular breakfast in China. Arriving at a plant fossil once found.It was a cloudy day and I was using telephoto, so it was a bit dark.The top of the hill is a temple, but I don't know if it's Buddhist or Taoist. The first discovery, perhaps, was of lepidodendron. The second one, it's a cute little guy. Found a beautiful leaf. Slowly uncover it.But because of the invasion of iron oxide, the rock was brittle. Ferns were found. Carefully dug for a long time, the result is still broken:( The next few. The final image is of an American Ivy in the wild.I like its leaves. They are very beautiful.But I don't know why the leaves closed a little bit, maybe I came too early.
  25. San Diego fossil plants

    Hey everyone pretty new here. My wife and I were at the beach collecting shells and I noticed some erosion on the cliffs and found these in the ruble. I think these are fossil plants. Looks to me like a leaf and fern? I’d love some help putting a name to these if possible. USA, California, San Diego, Sunset Cliffs on the beach
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